What field would you rather study, science or the arts and humanities?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 18, 2014 12:00 AM GMT
    Two fields that often compliment each other. Whether it's a cameras technology being used to capture a documentary or coffee (caffeine) and music to get yourself in the zone prior to exercising.

    Of course we value and need both. Out of curiosity what do RJ members value more if only given one option?
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    May 18, 2014 12:04 AM GMT
    Well I am a sicentist and study science…soooo
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    May 18, 2014 12:05 AM GMT
    RadRTT saidWell I am a sicentist and study science…soooo


    What does sicentist mean?
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    May 18, 2014 12:05 AM GMT
    RadRTT saidWell I am a sicentist and study science…soooo


    me too
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    May 18, 2014 12:07 AM GMT
    follow your heart
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    May 18, 2014 12:08 AM GMT
    I graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.
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    May 18, 2014 12:10 AM GMT
    I don't think you can make a choice, really.
    Science teaches us to observe carefully, to measure accurately, to base our conclusions on incontrovertible evidence, and to construct frameworks of understanding based on the evidence gathered by observation or experiment.

    The humanities teach us about ourselves---our history, our nation, our families, how others think and feel and see the world through written records, literature, arts, and philosophy.

    How can you dispense with either?
  • buddycat

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    May 18, 2014 12:17 AM GMT
    My degrees are in computer science but of course this is not a hard science, some would argue not a science at all since it does not deal with the natural world like hard sciences do. If I was to study something now, I may consider studying arts and humanities and find some inter-disciplinary field that interests me like cognitive science. I did like social science courses and writing courses while working on my undergrad degree. I would recommend studying what you are interested in the most.
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    May 18, 2014 12:18 AM GMT
    You should do that for which you find yourself qualified, and interested.

    I know the clever guys look for the money fields. Whatever offers the best return, that's what they do. Whether they like it or not, they're in it for the money.

    But a lot of us aren't satisfied with that. I wasn't. I chose a military career, sorta by accident. Never made much money that way, nobody can, and I have less today. But I was happy. It suited me. I have no regrets, and a lot of great memories. icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 18, 2014 12:22 AM GMT
    Sharkspeare saidI don't think you can make a choice, really.
    Science teaches us to observe carefully, to measure accurately, to base our conclusions on incontrovertible evidence, and to construct frameworks of understanding based on the evidence gathered by observation or experiment.

    The humanities teach us about ourselves---our history, our nation, our families, how others think and feel and see the world through written records, literature, arts, and philosophy.

    How can you dispense with either?


    When I went through the humanities program at Rollins, we definitely had to apply analytical reasoning and discipline to our studies of art, literature.etc. We needed to understand so many facets to any subject; But expect me to explain anything scientific or mathematical...I'll cry. icon_neutral.gif
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    May 18, 2014 12:37 AM GMT
    I guess I should state where I'm coming from.

    I've always been interested in psychology, but I don't view it as an exact science and it has too many grey areas.

    Then I realized that neuroscience was a little more concrete, but it's often criticized -- humans don't want their motivations or emotions to be labeled as just a bunch of chemicals in their brain. If given the ability to be put in a state of "being in the zone/runners high", "a feeling of perpetual pleasure", or "completely relaxed and rejuvenated" -- without any side effects would you? Imagine being able to have an experience of your choosing on your day off i.e. an orgasm for several hours, feeling totally embraced, or getting some R&R.

    Fighter pilots and ER doctors currently use prescriptions to perform their jobs. Ideally the advances in these fields would help people that actually have a need for it.

    When I think about all of this I don't know if neuroscience could truly reproduce the feelings you have when you hear a touching song or watch a moving play. At best neuroscience can evolve itself to diagnose or validate if treatment is needed or even beneficial.
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    May 18, 2014 12:42 AM GMT
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.
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    May 18, 2014 12:53 AM GMT
    n8698u said
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.


    When going back to school did you ever consider an "in-demand" job such as nursing?
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    May 18, 2014 1:07 AM GMT
    AnOriginal said
    n8698u said
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.


    When going back to school did you ever consider an "in-demand" job such as nursing?


    No.
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    May 18, 2014 1:10 AM GMT
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u said
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.


    Career student! icon_biggrin.gif


    No, but I would like to think I keep learning every day.
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    May 18, 2014 1:13 AM GMT
    n8698u said
    AnOriginal said
    n8698u said
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.


    When going back to school did you ever consider an "in-demand" job such as nursing?


    No.


    Oh I wasn't judging or teasing like silverbullet, just curious.
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    May 18, 2014 1:15 AM GMT
    AnOriginal said
    n8698u said
    AnOriginal said
    n8698u said
    silver_bullet said
    n8698u saidI graduated with a degree in the humanities, with a fine arts background.


    Flipping burgers these days or stocking shelves at W Mart?


    Neither. I'm working toward a degree in library/museum sciences.


    When going back to school did you ever consider an "in-demand" job such as nursing?


    No.


    Oh I wasn't judging or teasing like silverbullet, just asking.


    I didn't think you were.