Love my job and don't want to quit, but may have no choice...what to do?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2014 12:48 AM GMT
    I'm 23 (turning 24 in August) and I work as a Sales Rep for a sign company that my friend took over. He and I were co-workers in a pharmacy, and he was working at this sign company for 7 years at the same time (he had 2 jobs). The previous owner sold the business to him last year, and he hired me so I left my job at the pharmacy as well.

    I really love what I do, and love working with my friend. It doesn't even feel like a job to me. I don't dread going into work at all.

    However, I'm not making much money. I never finished college, so I figured that I'll have to go back soon and get a degree so that I can get a better-paying career.

    My friend doesn't want me to quit, and he has hopes of growing the business into something really big and hopes that I will stay on board with him. He really isn't making much yet either, but we are already doing double what the previous owner did (he was on old lazy shit who never invested into the business).

    I thought that perhaps I would go back to school this Fall for something like Nursing...it pays well, great job security, benefits, etc. I just know that nothing will compare to the level of enjoyment and low-stress that I have at my current job. We definitely do work, but we just have so much fun. There's only 4 of us right now, but I'm sure we will grow.

    What would you do if you were in my situation? Would you stay on board and try to see if the business grows for a few years? Or would you go back to school while working at this job, and quit after graduation?
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    May 20, 2014 1:01 AM GMT
    im sorry and I dont mean to sound like a know-it-all prick, I swear.

    BUT.

    Nursing is NOT what ppl make it out to be. Like everyone says there's this HUGE demand for nurses with ObamaCare and retiring baby-boomers, so you'll ALWAYS have a relatively good job. That is completely false and schools use that as a marketing gimmick to get kids/students to enroll in their nursing schools. There's no nursing shortage, there's no huge demand for nurses in hospitals. These schools are cranking out nurses a dime a dozen and barely any of them can land a proper nursing job, rather they become "CNAs" (Certified Nursing Assistants) and basically change bed sheets and clean up shit and vomit.... get paid like $9/hour

    Jobs in nursing aren't plentiful, please take that into consideration should u return to school. It's an expensive degree to get and if u cant get a nursing job outside of school, idk how u gonna pay off those loans. Seriously, next thing u know you'll have to end up with somebody who looks like Bruce Jenner. and i know u dont want that.

  • Phobophobia

    Posts: 20

    May 20, 2014 1:06 AM GMT
    To be brutally honest with you, I advocate going to college and pursuing a rewarding career that you will love. Do not pursue any career if you don't have a passion for it, it will just make you miserable in the end.

    Why not attend college part-time? I'm sure you can flex your current work schedule to your classes. You may have to go to class early in the morning or take night classes. But if your serious about going to college find something your intrigued in or find a career that matches your interests, I cannot stress that enough. Then if the business never succeeds or goes under you'll have a safety net.

    But personally, I would keep my current job for the sake of finances and soon as I complete my degree AND land a career with security THEN I'll leave.

    That's my 0.02
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2014 1:14 AM GMT
    Import saidim sorry and I dont mean to sound like a know-it-all prick, I swear.

    BUT.

    Nursing is NOT what ppl make it out to be. Like everyone says there's this HUGE demand for nurses with ObamaCare and retiring baby-boomers, so you'll ALWAYS have a relatively good job. That is completely false and schools use that as a marketing gimmick to get kids/students to enroll in their nursing schools. There's no nursing shortage, there's no huge demand for nurses in hospitals. These schools are cranking out nurses a dime a dozen and barely any of them can land a proper nursing job, rather they become "CNAs" (Certified Nursing Assistants) and basically change bed sheets and clean up shit and vomit.... get paid like $9/hour

    Jobs in nursing aren't plentiful, please take that into consideration should u return to school. It's an expensive degree to get and if u cant get a nursing job outside of school, idk how u gonna pay off those loans. Seriously, next thing u know you'll have to end up with somebody who looks like Bruce Jenner. and i know u dont want that.


    Not sure if this is something in your area
    BUT
    You are completely wrong

  • May 20, 2014 1:14 AM GMT
    Import saidim sorry and I dont mean to sound like a know-it-all prick, I swear.

    BUT.

    Nursing is NOT what ppl make it out to be. Like everyone says there's this HUGE demand for nurses with ObamaCare and retiring baby-boomers, so you'll ALWAYS have a relatively good job. That is completely false and schools use that as a marketing gimmick to get kids/students to enroll in their nursing schools. There's no nursing shortage, there's no huge demand for nurses in hospitals. These schools are cranking out nurses a dime a dozen and barely any of them can land a proper nursing job, rather they become "CNAs" (Certified Nursing Assistants) and basically change bed sheets and clean up shit and vomit.... get paid like $9/hour

    Jobs in nursing aren't plentiful, please take that into consideration should u return to school. It's an expensive degree to get and if u cant get a nursing job outside of school, idk how u gonna pay off those loans. Seriously, next thing u know you'll have to end up with somebody who looks like Bruce Jenner. and i know u dont want that.

    Im glad you posted this because people need to know. Another thing that i might add is that due to how insurances are paying doctor's, or more like, how they DO NOT want to pay doctors, nurses are now doing a lot of what doctors used to do AS WELL as their regular chores. Its a long day with a hell of a lot of work.
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    May 20, 2014 1:18 AM GMT
    Yeah, OP I would go for Medical Assistant certificate program
    then you'll know if you are cut out for nursing. Not only that, but most program can be done at night and in less than 9 months.
    Most hospitals have you work 3 twelve hour shifts. (3 days on 4 off}
    if you do these weekend nights you can earn nearly 5 dollars more an hour--you'll have all week to grow your sign business.
  • Phobophobia

    Posts: 20

    May 20, 2014 1:19 AM GMT
    silver_bullet saidThree Reasons Why College Bubble Will Burst


    Most colleges cost too much.

    Students are getting into horrendous debt — now totalling $1 trillion and counting — and not finding decent paying jobs. It’s hurting our long-term future.

    Yet the myth persists that paying a ransom for a college degree is worth it, particularly at a top-tier institution.

    Fortunately, this thinking is being challenged. When students and families realize they don’t have to overpay for college expenses, the bubble will burst.

    According to Paul Glastris, whose Washington Monthly magazine does an honest annual assessment of college rankings, “we’re on an unsustainable path that’s increasingly burdensome for the middle class — and risky.”(Disclosure: I recently freelanced a piece for the magazine)

    For far too long, publications have done their college rankings based on perceived prestige.

    It’s been more of a recognition of brand-name appeal than real-world measures of how many students graduate, their total debt load and what kinds of jobs they get after they get their degree.

    There are some better ways to evaluate colleges — Washington Monthly is certainly on the right track — but we have to get away from the idea that the more a college costs, the better it must be. Many of the elite colleges have become closed bastions that cater to the upper class.

    The magazine turned this idea around and asked, which colleges allow for greater social mobility, that is, accept more students from the middle- and lower classes? Which ones stress public service and research over shiny new student centers and athletic facilities? In short, which colleges provide the most bang for your buck?

    Washington Monthly’s college survey is the foundation for a paradigm change that will hasten bursting of the college bubble. Here’s why:

    * In recent years, the price of college has been overinflated relative to the cost of living and the life value it provides. The assumption that high-priced college is a universal ticket to prosperity needs to be re-examined. According to the Washington Monthly:

    “Something changed after the Great Recession of 2008. As with many other parts of American life, this time was different. States made unprecedented cuts to higher education budgets. By 2012, inflation-adjusted state appropriations per student were 21 percent lower than they had been in 1990. Tuition in some of the nation’s biggest public university systems jumped 50 percent or more in the span of four years.”

    * For many families, college is a terrible deal. It’s not a guarantee of a higher-paying job nor is it going to ensure that a graduate will be able to afford a home, a new car and all of the trappings of middle-class life.

    * You can still find colleges that represent a decent value, but you have to look hard. Here’s a revelation: three of the top colleges ranked by Washington Monthly probably wouldn’t make any other publication’s top-10 list. Amherst College in Massachusetts and City University of New York’s Queens and Baruch Colleges topped their rankings. Amherst, for example, had a 96-percent graduation rate and a “net” price (after financial aid) of $843 annually.

    What Needs to Be Done

    While no ranking system is perfect, the important lens to view this problem through is how much non-loan aid does a school provide?

    Some schools with rich endowments are quite generous in providing grants, while others send you right to the loan officer. It’s the “net” cost relative to the eventual benefits in terms of gainful employment that counts — something the U.S. Department of Education is currently evaluating.

    There also needs to be some coordination between community colleges and four-year schools. Why sit in a classroom getting taught a basic course by a graduate assistant paying full tuition at a university when you can get the same thing at a community college for half the cost?

    This is not to say that junior colleges are ideal places for learning: only 11% of students go on to earn a four-year degree. But we can make higher education more localized. Online courses are a start. Lower-cost satellite campuses are another.

    College pricing will probably undergo what happened to dot-com stocks in 2000. Those institutions with over-hyped reputations and exorbitant prices will be challenged by the market to justify their tuition, which may not hold up at present rates. Colleges that are nimble and embrace high-value, online/offsite lifelong learning will survive.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwasik/2013/09/04/three-reasons-why-college-bubble-will-burst/



    Oh god, where do I begin...
    People are still going to college despite that wall of text you pasted and yes indeed, some careers out there aren't worth the amount of debt your getting into, but that doesn't mean its not other ways to get into a rewarding career. Not to mention most employees WANT people who are college educated, not those who are not. Right now at my local Best Buy simple low entry positions prefer an associate degree.

    I'm a pre-med college student and I attend classes at a local community college and one day will transfer to my state university saving thousands upon thousands of dollars. There are ways to earn money via scholarships, grants, financial aid, merit aid etc. My friend is currently working toward a bachelors degree at a state university and he basically goes there for little because of the aid and grants he received.
  • nightheat

    Posts: 21

    May 20, 2014 1:20 AM GMT
    I don't know much about business, but if what you say is true, and you're making DOUBLE already.

    I think i'd stick around to see what's behind the next corner if i were you. You could be making triple soon enough, then that could even double..

    idk, you didn't give specifics on what you do. Like they say, if you love your job, it's not really a job at all.

  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    May 20, 2014 1:24 AM GMT
    There is too much emphasis on going to college and getting that all mighty degree. A college education is no absolute guarantee for success and prosperity in life regardless what all the so-called statistics say, that is mostly propaganda. There are a lot of people without college degrees that are very successful and happy in life. It depends on how you apply yourself to different situations. There are also a lot of college degreed people who are either employed at low paying work or underemployed. There are a lot of people out there with top notch grades and college degrees that unfortunately are stuck working in low wage, menial jobs like pushing brooms or flipping hamburgers. There are only so many professional level jobs available. However, there is a growing shortage of skilled tradesmen in the US. Probably you should consider a skilled trade instead.
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    May 20, 2014 1:25 AM GMT
    That's true. A college educated idiot is still an idiot.
  • Import

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    May 20, 2014 1:25 AM GMT
    dustin_K_tx said
    Import saidim sorry and I dont mean to sound like a know-it-all prick, I swear.

    BUT.

    Nursing is NOT what ppl make it out to be. Like everyone says there's this HUGE demand for nurses with ObamaCare and retiring baby-boomers, so you'll ALWAYS have a relatively good job. That is completely false and schools use that as a marketing gimmick to get kids/students to enroll in their nursing schools. There's no nursing shortage, there's no huge demand for nurses in hospitals. These schools are cranking out nurses a dime a dozen and barely any of them can land a proper nursing job, rather they become "CNAs" (Certified Nursing Assistants) and basically change bed sheets and clean up shit and vomit.... get paid like $9/hour

    Jobs in nursing aren't plentiful, please take that into consideration should u return to school. It's an expensive degree to get and if u cant get a nursing job outside of school, idk how u gonna pay off those loans. Seriously, next thing u know you'll have to end up with somebody who looks like Bruce Jenner. and i know u dont want that.


    Not sure if this is something in your area
    BUT
    You are completely wrong


    actually, dumbass, NO.
    You're wrong.

  • Phobophobia

    Posts: 20

    May 20, 2014 1:28 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidThere is too much emphasis on going to college and getting that all mighty degree. A college education is no absolute guarantee for success and prosperity in life regardless what all the so-called statistics say, that is mostly propaganda. There are a lot of people without college degrees that are very successful and happy in life. It depends on how you apply yourself to different situations. There are also a lot of college degreed people who are either employed at low paying work or underemployed. There are a lot of people out there with top notch grades and college degrees that unfortunately are stuck working in low wage, menial jobs like pushing brooms or flipping hamburgers. There are only so many professional level jobs available. However, there is a growing shortage of skilled tradesmen in the US. Probably you should consider a skilled trade instead.


    I never said it was for everyone icon_lol.gif. I advocate people getting into a career they have a passion for whatever it may be. You misunderstand.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    May 20, 2014 1:32 AM GMT
    give it 2 years, work like hell and grow the business - it beats the shit out of working for a hospital or a big corp.

    can you get equity?

    look into becoming a 1099 contractor and get paid commission and service contracts instead of working directly for him - you may have some tax advantages
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    May 20, 2014 1:36 AM GMT
    OP, it may be something to think about. It would suck to give up on this business and see it 2 years from now blowing up....

    Since u seem to already enjoy sales, perhaps consider a career in sales.

    Car salesman, insurance salesman, software sales, a million things to sell. And if you're good at selling, you'll make bank too.
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    May 20, 2014 1:43 AM GMT
    Import said
    actually, dumbass, NO.
    You're wrong.


    yeah you must be right.
    However it Doesn't explain the dozens and dozens of emails to my link-in account.
    --Huston is begging, BEGGING, right now.

    You're correct about some of these schools though and I do fear they're pumping a lot of certificate nurses into the system.
    But thanks to 'Affordable' health care a lot of BS and MA nurses are getting their Practitioner licenses. Leaving an even bigger gap.
    As for CNA's, a lot of hospitals are getting rid of them going with "Total Care".
  • Phobophobia

    Posts: 20

    May 20, 2014 2:02 AM GMT
    silver_bullet said
    Phobophobia said

    I never said it was for everyone icon_lol.gif. I advocate people getting into a career they have a passion for whatever it may be. You misunderstand.


    You made specific statements supposedly debunking the article. But they were wrong.

    Now you attempt yet another non sequitur brush off. Remarkable.icon_lol.gif


    Hm? As I stated before and I will state again, people should pursue things they're passionate about. Anything else?
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    May 20, 2014 2:10 AM GMT
    You're only 23, so you can still give it a couple more years. If after that amount of time, it is time to find something that is going to get you to old age and buy those cool things you would like to have.
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    May 20, 2014 2:12 AM GMT
    do both?
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    May 20, 2014 2:37 PM GMT
    Everyone has to become aware and savvy about the times. Keep in mind that the transitions in society have been difficult and the disparity is growing between the classes.

    It is unfortunately becoming just as important with your social standing (class related). Who you are and who you know with whether you are selected for a job.

    They are misleading people. Do your research. I know that in nursing for example they are hiring part time only in some facilities if you can find work. People I know have had to relocate to find a job because none are available in their area.

    A helluva lot of work for people to go to school, earn a degree and have to relocate and not be gainfully employed in a full time job.

    Stay with your job if you are able to and try going to school at the same time. In a competitive job market you need to do whatever you can to marketable.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2014 2:48 PM GMT
    If you chase happiness, you'll be happy. If you chase money, you'll be wealthy.

    Your choice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2014 2:52 PM GMT
    its the great recession.
    Once things are proven to be every day better and totally fixed quit your job, get that education, relocate and a new career

    -you have a job you like, flourish
    -no new employer will want you w/o experience in a recession
    -chances are you will no like your new employ either, they call it work for a reason.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 20, 2014 2:52 PM GMT
    I think it wise to finish your degree ... for your future if nothing else. That should be a priority. I'd talk to your friend and make your concerns and thoughts about this very clear. You truly enjoy working with him, but you have to start making more money.

    I'm an analyst, so I want all facts on the table first, including serious discussions. It will be your choice once you examine all relevant facts on the path which would be most prudent. I know it can be tough, but take stock in the fact you are giving this serious consideration.
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    May 20, 2014 3:43 PM GMT
    Phobophobia saidOh god, where do I begin...
    People are still going to college despite that wall of text you pasted and yes indeed, some careers out there aren't worth the amount of debt your getting into, but that doesn't mean its not other ways to get into a rewarding career. Not to mention most employees WANT people who are college educated, not those who are not. Right now at my local Best Buy simple low entry positions prefer an associate degree.

    I'm a pre-med college student and I attend classes at a local community college and one day will transfer to my state university saving thousands upon thousands of dollars. There are ways to earn money via scholarships, grants, financial aid, merit aid etc. My friend is currently working toward a bachelors degree at a state university and he basically goes there for little because of the aid and grants he received.

    Oh god, where do I…I begin….First, let's leave 'pre-med' for when you get out of community college and even get your BS. To say you're 'pre-med' at this stage is a little pre-mature.

    Second of all, that 'friend' of yours, "My friend is currently working toward a bachelors degree at a state university and he basically goes there for little because of the aid and grants he received", he's getting those things because of his limited income levels, not because it's available to just anyone. Our entire system of education favors those who spend and don't save, are often irresponsible and on occasion, unfortunate. If the OP has saved, invested in a business or has any assets at all, he's screwed for any of the 'freebies' that your friend has.

    Yes, businesses want degrees because our society has lost focus, in their greediness, of the value of trades, manual labor and those that are scholastically challenged. I've seen many college graduates that have degrees but couldn't hit their ass with their hands on it!

    To the OP: If you love what you're doing…don't stop. If you feel compelled to get a degree, do it through night school or part time so you can maintain what you're doing and love to do. Work with your friend to better yourself for the good of the business. A degree won't necessarily bring happiness but what you enjoy doing will.

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    May 20, 2014 4:20 PM GMT
    The thing is, if I do go back to school I want to get a degree that is worth something and will actually benefit me if this job doesn't work out in the long run, which is why I was considering Nursing...guess that wasn't a good idea after all according to what some people in this thread are saying.

    Should I just pursue a business degree?
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    May 20, 2014 9:15 PM GMT
    ant811 saidThe thing is, if I do go back to school I want to get a degree that is worth something and will actually benefit me if this job doesn't work out in the long run, which is why I was considering Nursing...guess that wasn't a good idea after all according to what some people in this thread are saying.
    Should I just pursue a business degree?

    I would think a business administration or something like that. Then if the business succeeds, you can use it to your benefit there. Also, if you leave, you'll have experience in management, possible ownership and business administration. Seems that's what you really enjoy now.