LeBron James' Controversy

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    May 21, 2014 2:35 AM GMT
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    NYT: LeBron James has willingly injected himself into the controversy over Donald Sterling’s ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/19/sports/basketball/nbas-on-court-leader-embraces-off-court-mantle-without-fear.html?ref=sports
  • madsexy

    Posts: 4843

    May 21, 2014 12:22 PM GMT
    And rightly he is. Every person of every color and gender who is involved in pro basketball should speak out and take any stand they legally can against this type of atrocity. Only by refusing to stand for it will it stop, and the Commissioner did his part. Now it's up to the owners and everyone else to rally to the end result. icon_exclaim.gif
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    May 21, 2014 4:28 PM GMT
    I prefer LeBron's outspokenness and willingness to open himself to criticism than to Michael Jordan's cowardly silence on big issues because "Republicans buy shoes too." LeBron is using his visibility to bring attention to causes bigger than him in the tradition of transcendent athletes like Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ashe, Venus Williams, and Jim Brown and good on him for it.

    However, on this particular point, I still feel Donald Sterling is getting a bad rap. I'm the first to criticize bigotry when it's real, but Donald Sterling was not intending to be racist I don't think.

    In fact, a close listening to the transcript of the infamous call -- which includes reading between the lines -- indicates that he was inadvertently complimenting black guys.

    What I heard in him saying 'I don't want you around black guys, don't bring blacks to my games' was an aging, increasingly infirm man who has anxiety about his own declining attractiveness and virility, particularly in comparison to black guys. These remarks were about sexual competition, not about racism.

    About the only way Sterling was that he let slip his stereotypes about black male sexuality and sexual prowess, but -- come on, the guy shouldn't be drummed out of the NBA because of that.
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    May 21, 2014 4:31 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    About the only way Sterling was that he let slip his stereotypes about black male sexuality and sexual prowess, but -- come on, the guy shouldn't be drummed out of the NBA because of that.

    Read Sterling's long history of racial bigotry, especially against Blacks. It did not suddenly happen with these remarks to his GF (or whatever she's supposed to be).

    He was long of concern to the NBA and its players, but as a veteran owner they kept looking the other way. I blame the league as well for not addressing this problem sooner, until it exploded in their faces. Which may partly explain the Commissioner's quick and harsh judgment.
  • madsexy

    Posts: 4843

    May 21, 2014 6:13 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete saidI prefer LeBron's outspokenness and willingness to open himself to criticism than to Michael Jordan's cowardly silence on big issues because "Republicans buy shoes too." LeBron is using his visibility to bring attention to causes bigger than him in the tradition of transcendent athletes like Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ashe, Venus Williams, and Jim Brown and good on him for it.

    However, on this particular point, I still feel Donald Sterling is getting a bad rap. I'm the first to criticize bigotry when it's real, but Donald Sterling was not intending to be racist I don't think.

    In fact, a close listening to the transcript of the infamous call -- which includes reading between the lines -- indicates that he was inadvertently complimenting black guys.

    What I heard in him saying 'I don't want you around black guys, don't bring blacks to my games' was an aging, increasingly infirm man who has anxiety about his own declining attractiveness and virility, particularly in comparison to black guys. These remarks were about sexual competition, not about racism.

    About the only way Sterling was that he let slip his stereotypes about black male sexuality and sexual prowess, but -- come on, the guy shouldn't be drummed out of the NBA because of that.

    While I applaud your generous spirit, there's no way he was intending his comments as compliment, no way his past actions and statements and lawsuits settled on this don't support that he's a terrible racist - and has no business owning a pro sports team with that track record. Just NO!
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    May 21, 2014 6:19 PM GMT
    In another thread, I reported a study that shows that 45% of NBA audience are African-Americans so I think Sterling's comments stung.
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    May 21, 2014 11:46 PM GMT
    I am so tired of this Donald Sterling shit.

    News flash: there are assholes everywhere. Just because someone has certain beliefs in their private life, which is seperate from their professional one, they shouldn't be punished for it. Just like someone listing being gay on Facebook and being fired, none of it makes sense. He should not have had such a big uproar about what he said in private. His beliefs. Don't accept them? Get over them. People are so sensitive sheesh.
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    May 24, 2014 2:49 AM GMT
    Personally I find this whole ordeal with Sterling to be perplexing because one hand yeah he doesn't like black people however his money makers are black as well as his mistress.

    On the other the whole reason this is in the public arena is because a private recording, v/m or audio file was released to the public. So I can't say how I feel either way.

    I feel James's words would have more standing if he were a clippers player. I get the racist bigotry thing and understand it but if doesn't apply to you directly why get involved, especially after actions have been taking.

    This whole ordeal is race-bating at its finest.