Aerobic exercise on rest days??

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 22, 2014 2:23 PM GMT
    I am trying to add big mass to my legs, mostly by focusing on very heavy compound exercises twice a week (usually squats and leg presses on one day and deadlifts and front squats another day). But, I have also started to add more cardio into my week though.

    ... will doing an intense 1 hr step class the day after I do a heavy leg work out interfere with my rest/recovery and muscle building??

    Thanks for any feedback!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 22, 2014 2:55 PM GMT
    You can do cardio in between heavy leg workout, but only 'light' cardio.
    Step adds join stress to the join and muscular stress.

    Also, after heavy squat, your coordination is damped and you can more easily make a false move and tear an ankle etc...

    One hour slow cardio, like elliptic machine, won't add knee and lower back stress, and will increase blood flow, allowing better muscular recovery, specially if you do stretching in the middle of your cardio .
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 22, 2014 7:15 PM GMT
    I'd be careful, I think you might be overdoing it, even though you are doing it on different days. Your legs need some rest as well.

    Now I do leg presses and squats and I DO some cardio on other days (non leg days), but I never go beyond 40 minutes or so... and thats alot.

    If you overdo, you will absolutely defeat what you are trying to accomplish, so I say back off a bit.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    May 22, 2014 8:00 PM GMT
    You could have knee problems if you do too much running in addition to other exercise which strains the knees. However, the problem would probably develop gradually so you'd have time to cut back on the running. Running three miles three times per week at a moderate pace is adequate aerobic exercise unless you really want to increase your running speed or distance. A pace of eight minutes per mile is adequate and should not be difficult.

    You cannot be in the best possible aerobic and lifting condition at the same time so some compromise is necessary.

    You could do bicycle riding or swimming for aerobic exercise since neither would be likely to cause joint problems. For good fitness, aerobic exercise is important even if it reduces slightly the strength gains you get from lifting.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 22, 2014 9:00 PM GMT
    You should be o.k. You may see yourself not quite as strong.

    You'll want to investigate HIIT vs standard cardio. You may find that HIIT is what you need to be doing.

    I make my leg workouts HIIT, and kill two birds with one workout.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    May 23, 2014 6:25 PM GMT
    sunjbill saidyeah, i agree with the HIIT suggestion, get high quality cardio done in 20 minutes or less.


    That does have its good points. It can fairly quickly lower the resting pulse rate, probably into the low 40s, and the resting pulse rate is a good indicator of cardiac fitness. There are multiple ways to do it, including intervals while running, bicycle riding, or swimming, during which one pushes oneself well into O2 debt. However, I think that there is also something to be said for endurance and that can be achieved only by prolonged exercise at an intensity somewhat below the maximum possible sustainable level.

    Doing high intensity aerobic exercise can be dangerous unless one works up to it gradually. Even then, it can be dangerous if there are underlying cardiac problems, such as partially clogged arteries. Even so, if it is done properly, it should be safe and it will reduce the likelihood of cardiac problems.
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    May 26, 2014 6:38 PM GMT
    FRE0 said
    sunjbill saidyeah, i agree with the HIIT suggestion, get high quality cardio done in 20 minutes or less.


    That does have its good points. It can fairly quickly lower the resting pulse rate, probably into the low 40s, and the resting pulse rate is a good indicator of cardiac fitness. There are multiple ways to do it, including intervals while running, bicycle riding, or swimming, during which one pushes oneself well into O2 debt. However, I think that there is also something to be said for endurance and that can be achieved only by prolonged exercise at an intensity somewhat below the maximum possible sustainable level.

    Doing high intensity aerobic exercise can be dangerous unless one works up to it gradually. Even then, it can be dangerous if there are underlying cardiac problems, such as partially clogged arteries. Even so, if it is done properly, it should be safe and it will reduce the likelihood of cardiac problems.


    Endurance is much more quickly achieved via HIIT and doesn't have the pathology of study death syndrome as does steady state cardio. This has been studied extensively. HIIT is vastly superior to steady state, low intensity, cardio, and improves cardiac endurance, as well as cardiac pump function in as few at 8 4 minute sessions.

    You need to study this further to become informed of current day science.

    Even in cardiac rehab, post surgical, two weeks out, they will take you to 85%, while on an EKG, because the results are so much better with HIIT.

    If you have heart disease, this is a great way to find it. You may be an irregular ST segment, but, it's better for that to happen than to drop dead. Find heart disease before it finds you.

    Your PASSIVE recovery should be 30 BPM in 90 seconds or better, if you don't have heart disease, FYI. (Mine is 35 BPM in 90, or even shorter.)

    Note that you should walk, not stop, if you're having pain, or shortness of breath. Your legs help your heart by as much as 2/3 of your cardiac function (leg pump, it's called). Do NOT lay down unless you absolutely feel you are going to hit the floor. Walk, instead, to keep the blood moving, taking deep, long, breathes.

    If you have severe pain in your shoulders, chest, traps, neck, and it doesn't calm down. CHEW a whole aspirin, and get to an EKG, where someone can look at your EKG. It could be nothing, or, you could be dying.
  • topathlete

    Posts: 882

    May 27, 2014 12:39 AM GMT
    Agree with the comments on HIIT. I interact with some leading fitness people who train professional athletes and are up on the current research. For explosive power even for non-cardio activities it is best to avoid long periods of moderate cardio. From what I understand this applies to non-athletes as well not just for explosive power but for general well-being.