Shin splints?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 27, 2014 8:58 PM GMT
    I've been having this annoying pain in my front shin for the past two weeks... which is exactly when I bumped up my cardio to include more intense runs up stairs and hills several more times a week (was only two, now it's five).

    Is this a "shin splint"? Looking it up it says that you have to quit high impact exercise for several months... ugh. I can't do that. Any advice before I talk to the doctor about it? :/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 27, 2014 9:00 PM GMT
    I'm no doctor... But I have a fuck ton of chronic orthopedic and tendon/ligament issues... I'm 99% sure you have shin splints.

    I just ignored my shin splints. Got it looked at and they were all like, yeah shin splints. Then again, there's way too much wrong with my body and I'm only 23. Don't listen to my advice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 27, 2014 9:44 PM GMT
    Welcome to having fun. After all, it's better to have fun and experience pain than it is to be bored and "safe."
  • BuggEyedSprit...

    Posts: 920

    May 28, 2014 1:13 PM GMT
    This, per Active.com...

    http://www.active.com/running/Articles/How-Runners-Get-Shin-Splint-Treatment-Wrong-and-4-Ways-to-Get-it-Right.htm?page=2
  • stratavos

    Posts: 1831

    May 28, 2014 9:10 PM GMT
    from what I understand about them... it means you either need to rest more often after being intense about running/walking, or go slower. I get them as well, but it's because I like to get places quickly. As long as you rest up, it's gone for the next day/time you plan on going out.

    If it's truly serious... be ready for some icebaths...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 28, 2014 10:17 PM GMT
    I stopped getting them after I strengthened my ankles. I have no idea what the connection was.
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    May 29, 2014 12:50 AM GMT
    Thanks for the advice guys!
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    May 29, 2014 3:49 AM GMT
    Pheidippides saidI stopped getting them after I strengthened my ankles. I have no idea what the connection was.


    The muscles in the front of the leg (where most people get "shin splints") run across the ankle and attach to bones on the feet. There aren't any muscles per se at the ankle, only the tendons that run from the shin to the foot. So if you strengthen your ankle, you're actually strengthening those muscles in your leg.

    Make sure you warm up and cool down, especially if you've bumped things up considerably. Stretching can help, too. Usually, you gradually increase your intensity for activities you haven't done too much of in the past, e.g. running, stair climbing, hills.

    Running form can also be a culprit. Shoe wear as well. Start slow and work your way up. When you start weight lifting, you usually don't go to a 405 lb deadlift after you've only been doing 225 (I exaggerate, but you get the point). Same thing for aerobic/cardio exercise that's high impact.

    If it's currently painful, rest it for a few days. ACTIVE rest, meaning do stuff like walk, or stretch, or compound strengthening exercises for the hips on down (especially hip abductors, glutes, quads, calves). I wouldn't recommend running or stair climbing right now until the pain has decreased.

    The leg has an anterior and posterior compartment (and lateral, too). The anterior or front compartment houses the muscles, nerves, and blood vessels in the front of the leg, and the posterior all the stuff in the back of leg (calves and other stuff). When something swells, it takes up more space in an already squished and confined volume, squeezing other structures (thus the pain). Just "working through it" may worsen things.

    NOW, if the pain is severe and/or gets worse, isn't relieved by rest, or the pain is very focused (meaning it's in one area and you can easily point to it with a finger) or just putting weight through your leg is painful, I'd see a physician.

    Granted, I DON'T KNOW what you have because I'm not there to actually determine it. My advice: Go see a physician if it doesn't go away with the above "suggestions".
  • rrrazorsharp

    Posts: 30

    May 29, 2014 4:11 AM GMT
    Regardless of what is said here (there is some good advice given), you should still go talk to your doctor or physiotherapist.

    I had shinsplints pretty bad (still do if I don't stretch properly) and for a while ignored it/tried some "home remedies". Finally it got to a point I couldn't even run for 3 minutes until the pain started.

    Saw a physiotherapist and they pointed out/solved the issues. First, multiple ankle sprains had created bad cartilage in my ankles that was effecting my range of motion, my feet were on an angle (like a duck) when i walk/run and my tendons were knotted and tight (the worse she's seen). To cap it all off, had extremely high arches, and I walk on the outside of my foot. So i was not getting any of the support i needed.

    So in the end had a few session to break up the scar tissue in my ankles (not fun), had dry needling done to break up the knots in my calves (close to acupuncture, but the process involves finding the knot with your hands, inserting the needle, the knot will tense around the needle, then release), worked out a plan to strengthen my ankles and got a good pair of orthotics custom made.

    The point here is that there were issues I wouldn't have known about unless I talked to a professional. Yours might just be as simple as getting proper stretching in, or something a little more complicated like mine.

    Hope you get it sorted out! icon_smile.gif
  • johndubuque

    Posts: 319

    May 29, 2014 6:22 AM GMT
    You should probably not get too alarmed. When I've had shin splints it's always been a short term condition. I remember the first time it happened...I was a high school senior and visited a college campus and spent most of the day walking on concrete. Even though I was an athlete and did a lot of running, my legs were not accustomed to concrete, and my shins hurt for a few days.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 29, 2014 7:47 AM GMT
    Have my sympathy mate...I got shin splints from rugby training (forwards shouldn't be made to run long distances in heavy ground)

    Had to ease off for weeks at a time but let me focus on gym work and upper body strength. Doc recommended Iboprofen!

    Best of luck
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2014 1:19 PM GMT
    Hey man, I'm a Physical therapist and worked with a lot of patients who get (junk term) "shin splints". If it's your posterior tibialis muscle, located just on the inside and behind the front of your shin bone, it's probably being caused by a loading response at your foot. You might have a little bit of a "flat foot" when loading weight onto the foot due to weak intrinsic foot muscles (most people's are weak dues to all the foot wear we wear these days). You can look up a couple exercises to do to try to strengthen those but you probably need the bones in your foot mobilized a bit because they've been that way your whole life. In the meantime, scale back the distance and intensity. If you can find a physical therapist who is a cfmt (certified functional manual therapist) in your area, they'll probably tell you what I just did, as long as it's the muscle I'm thinking you're complaining about - as I can't see or feel your leg right now lol. Private me if you need help finding one.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2014 4:33 PM GMT
    Sounds like what I had.

    I had shin splints as a result of becoming flat footed. I was fitted with orthotics (casted, not foam) and after a week of rest and month of slowly getting back to my running routine, I have been shin splint pain free since. Now knee pain, that stopped me in 97, is another topic. lol

    But, check with your physician for a podiatrist referral.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2014 6:11 AM GMT
    "shin splint" isn't a thing. It's a generic term that's often used to describe pain/discomfort in the bones or muscles in front part of your tibia.

    If the pain is coming from the bones, go see a doctor ASAP. You want to make sure it's not some type of stress fracture developing. Not uncommon from doing intense high impact exercises.

    If the pain is coming from the muscles/soft tissue, then it's likely a muscle imbalance. Probably your calves are more powerful than your anterior tibial muscles. As Sean indicated previously, there are certain exercises you can do to alleviate muscle imbalances.

    Either way, you should go see a doctor rather than solicit medical advice from strangers from the internet. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2014 6:14 PM GMT
    sean_ny81 saidHey man, I'm a Physical therapist and worked with a lot of patients who get (junk term) "shin splints". If it's your posterior tibialis muscle, located just on the inside and behind the front of your shin bone, it's probably being caused by a loading response at your foot. You might have a little bit of a "flat foot" when loading weight onto the foot due to weak intrinsic foot muscles (most people's are weak dues to all the foot wear we wear these days). You can look up a couple exercises to do to try to strengthen those but you probably need the bones in your foot mobilized a bit because they've been that way your whole life. In the meantime, scale back the distance and intensity. If you can find a physical therapist who is a cfmt (certified functional manual therapist) in your area, they'll probably tell you what I just did, as long as it's the muscle I'm thinking you're complaining about - as I can't see or feel your leg right now lol. Private me if you need help finding one.


    I would have to highly recommend this as well. Try to see a physical therapist. Be forewarned, however, depending on your state, you may need to get a physician's referral first before seeing a PT. Like Sean said, a CFMT would be a good one to see, or one who is OCS or SCS certified (Orthopedic and Sports).

    And like others have said, "shin splint" is a term that's usually frowned upon now by more "up-to-date" clinicians. There is something called anterior compartment syndrome, but that's something more chronic.
  • C_Dezi

    Posts: 134

    May 31, 2014 11:01 PM GMT
    1) Put down a pad while you're sucking off overweight homes in the cobble-stone alleyway. I'd have thought this might have been a little bit more obvious of a solution.

    2) Under Obamacare, given your chosen profession, you should qualify for a workman's-comp driven legal claim resulting in you receiving titanium alloy-shin-replacement therapy. I always wanted to defile a prostitute named Wolverine. I'm sure others would too.

    3) Insurance would probably pay for the pad in suggestion (1). But who wants some skanky old styrofoam when you could have some shiny new cock-sucking shins.