Out of my league...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 4:22 AM GMT
    No...I'm not talking about a guy!

    I've just been asked by my GM to apply for the available Controller position at the hotel I've been working at. I've been working as an Accounting Clerk for only a couple years and, while I feel that I am capable of doing the job, I worry that my lack of experience and initial knowledge of the role could really thwart the interview, much less performing the job if training is limited.

    I really don't do things like this. I'm more of a practical and patient person when it comes to work. I mean, I'm only 24 and I don't even have a degree. They announce all promotions and all those bitches at the other properties would shit themselves if they knew a 24 year old with no secondary schooling made it to their role. I'm happy waiting and going to school, but I could also really use the money. So, I need to go for it.

    My question: Have any of you gone after a job that you weren't sure you could do? How do I get through an interview about a job that I'm not sure what the exact duties are? Anyone been a success in a management role they had no idea how to do?

    Any advice would be helpful...
  • awayfromtheci...

    Posts: 154

    Jan 06, 2009 4:29 AM GMT
    If your GM is telling you to apply, that means that he/she is in your corner. A great place to start. Trust me that you know more than you think you do from the work that you have already been doing. To bump that up, get on the internet and look up job descriptions for hotel controllers, controllers in general and anything realted to controllers. Take the initiative and get that job man. PLaces like salary.com and recruiting websites offer good information. The biggest obstacle in our ways is always ourselves.

    Good Luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 6:18 AM GMT
    Do it! You're young. You should not be in cruise control mode when it comes to your career. That's something you do later. icon_biggrin.gif

    Take advantage of the situation. It's new and scary and you're going to feel like you've bitten off more than you can chew. But you'll work through it. Like sfinthecity said, your GM didn't offer this position for shits and giggles. He must think you're qualified for the position. And if you have questions about your new position, I'm sure you can go to him for advice.

    Just do it. It's gonna suck for a while and you'll probably work your ass off. But once you get into the groove of your new job, you can reap the benefits and enjoy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 6:25 AM GMT
    I think you're overthinking. Your manager has confidence in your abilities so give yourself a little credit on being able to get through an interview and learn the things you need to learn. Afterall, you didn't go into your current position knowing everything there was to know.

    As for other people. Who cares what they think? A college degree is 2nd to experience. I think everyone who has had to get out into the job market recently knows that.

    Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 6:30 AM GMT
    Go for it.

    You have your GM's support, which is a huge advantage.

    Worst case scenario, you don't get the gig. But you prove to every senior manager that you're interested in moving up the ladder.

    The greater the risk, the greater the reward! Good luck!
  • charrismd

    Posts: 112

    Jan 06, 2009 6:35 AM GMT
    Is your GM your GENERAL MANAGER or your GRAND MOTHER? I'm not trying to be funny but, in my business, the GM abbreviation stands for grandmother.......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 6:39 AM GMT
    Go for it! I was asked to interview for a CEO position when I was 25. I had 9 separate interviews with 12 board of directors. It was grueling, but I got the job. We are our own worst critics when it comes to our own abilities. If your manager sees this as a viable opportunity then you should go for it. The worst case scenario is that you don't get the job, which still gives you interview experience. But before you interview, get a copy of the job description from HR, know the duties/objectives, and be prepared to tailor your answers towards those. And interview with confidence!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 6:56 AM GMT
    Yep, definitely go for it.

    I work in the hospo industry, and I can tell you that I am always promoting from within, and not necessarily always the person who has the most education or experience. Often times it comes from a gut feeling about who will work best in the role.

    If your GM is interested in you applying, there could be a few different things going on.

    Sometimes, I will encourage someone to apply for a position I know they are not ready for. This is to prepare them for rejection in the first instance so that they will later be more prepared and mature when another position comes up. It's a valuable part of growing an employee. It may seem harsh, but it eventually works in the employee's favour because they get to see the process of interviewing with the heads of the company.

    It also allows us as employers to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a candidate and then go back and prepare succession plans for individuals.

    The other part is that you always want to be seen to be up for a challenge. In hospitality, there is a small window to be asked to step up. If you refuse to apply for the role, you may well never be asked again. You could be seen as someone who has no interest in progressing in your work.

    Go for it and let us know how you go.
    Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 12:56 PM GMT
    In the interview, ask them questions that make it seem like you have already been offered the position and you are just clarifying your responsibilities in your own mind. That will impress them. Ask them SPECIFIC QUESTIONS that verify that you are ready for the position. If you're not sure what to ask, do research by emailing others who worked with that person's role before. You can do that ambiguously.

    I've always found that even the hardest jobs I've taken on, are difficult at first to get things rolling, but if you intend to do well and you put forth the effort you'll always move forward and do well. No one is going to try and put you in a position unless they think you can do it, how embarrassing would that be to recommend someone for a job who couldn't do it?

    unless they're just trying to have sex with you? In that case, just sleep your way to the top like I did, j/k

    Clay in Dallas
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 12:57 PM GMT
    Ditto what everyone else said. You've got support, and even if you don't get this position, it's good practice to see what kinds of things management is looking for, so then you can work on these things later.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 1:20 PM GMT
    I will be a note of caution. I would go for the interview simply because the General Manager has asked me to apply, and to turn him/her down might show a lack of ambition. However, your concerns are valid. Would you be supervising staff that used to be your peers? If so that will be one of your first challenges. The first management job I had was managing my former peers, and it was difficult.

    If you do get the job and it involves managing staff then I would recommend taking some courses as soon as possible.

    I would not be as concerned about the education part. Education credentials look good on paper, but the real learning is on the job. As an accounting clerk you have probably learned many of the nuts and bolts of the job which is always useful when you are put in a controller's position.

    Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 1:33 PM GMT
    OMG! If your GM believes in you, go for it! I know lots of people who have reached management positions because of a helping hand higher up ;-)

    Ask your GM why you think you're suitable for the role. He/she obviously saw something in you that made you a good fit. It is also possible that it would benefit the GM as well, since you are strategically positioned there where he/she wants you to be and ultimately the benefit would be worth more to your GM. The big picture is sometimes hidden from us and we do not necessarily see all the cards on the table.

    Gaining respect in a mangement position is a bit tricky as it relies on your personality rather than something you can learn from textbooks and MBAs. However, if you always lead by example (do not be a hypocrite), show concern for your subordinates, give praise when it is due, you'd be almost there. The fundamentals of management? You can always visit the bookstore (yawn). There are other bags of tricks, like whiteboarding and mindmapping to impress, but that depends on your field. I have no idea what a Controller is! LoL

    Carpe Diem!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 06, 2009 1:36 PM GMT
    Well I would think of it was a professional (and personal) challenge.
    Do your homework in advance, but have a little confidence. LIke the others above said, if the GM didn't see potential in you, he wouldn't have made the suggestion.

    In your interview be upbeat about your work ethic, experience and desire to do the job effectively. Be very candid about your experience and relate your
    desire to do the job... always be positive, but I'd make sure you discuss
    any concerns they may have regarding expectations.

    What I think you need to decide is whether you want the job. If you want it,
    embody it! Radiate that you want the challenge when you interview. If you don't want it, decline the offer and move forward. Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 2:25 PM GMT


    Quoting raynedog saying Carpe Diem!!!

    ...this should be interesting! Approach the interview from a grounded (realistic) but optimistic perspective and you'll sail!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 3:25 PM GMT
    I say GO FOR IT!!! What have you got to loose?????? Not a DAMN thing!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 3:30 PM GMT
    looknrnd said....while I feel that I am capable of doing the job, I worry that my lack of experience and initial knowledge of the role could really thwart the interview, much less performing the job if training is limited.


    Act as if you know what you are doing. If you are smart, you can learn very quickly. I've heard many stories from actors where they lied in interviews, saying they could play an instrument or dance, and then learned how to do it later.

    It's much better to go for a job that will stretch you than to stay in one that doesn't allow you to grow.

    I've gone for and gotten several jobs that I wasn't sure I could do. I just learned to tell myself that I could learn.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 3:32 PM GMT
    No guts, no glory.

    Why deny yourself an opportunity that could make you better finicially?
    Forget what and how other people feel in this situation. They aren't paying your bills. In this case it really IS all about you so go out there and get your dues, buddy, because if not I seriously doubt your co-workers are gonna sit around and wait for you to out shine them.

    In the world of jobs it's "Go big or go Home" and in this time of ecomonic destructure can you afford not to progress int he job market? You'll hate yourself for not going for gold when you had the chance.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 4:01 PM GMT
    You need to gain some spunk, kiddo.

    We all face challenges.

    Any "Real Jock" can tell you we face the unknown every time we compete. It's just the same thing in real life.

    Ever read the childhood story of the little engine that could? If you haven't, read it again today.

    Stop with the I,I,I,me,me,me self-sabotaging, negativity, and take the better job position and move forward. Don't make a plan, and excuses, for failure, even before you go down that path. The worst possible thing is that you'll fail. It's that simple.

    The very first time I competed at the national level, I was so scared my knees shook (for about two minutes). You walk into, through, and beyond your fears. I got the trophy, my first time out ( http://www.bodybuilders.com/chuckg.htm)

    If you're prepared, know your job, and the environment, stop making disclaimers for failure or a plan for failure. Plan for success; execute that plan for success; enjoy your success.

    Before I step on ESPN in less than my underwear, I KNOW I'm prepared. I KNOW I'm ready. I KNOW I have a good chance at success.

    Several of my millionaire friends are high school dropouts. True story.

    Take the world by the balls, and walk into, through, and beyond, your personal fears, and UP to the next level. You'll feel great once you do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 4:01 PM GMT
    Take the chance. You have your GM's backing and that says a lot about your character and his belief in your ability to perform the job. If by chance you are told that a secondary degree is necessary for qualification, there's no harm in asking that they support you going back to school (and possibly them paying for it) so that you may further your career.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 5:23 PM GMT
    maybe i'm just jealous b/c it's never happened to me, but i'm putting that aside to offer you advice. you should apply and hopefully you'll at least get an interview -- that's great experience. it exposes you to upper managers who you'll benefit from knowing later in your career, wether you get this job or not. so go in there, be confident, get the most out of the experience, and good luck.
    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 5:41 PM GMT
    Nothing ventured , nothing gained.....go for it.
    Your GM has faith in you thats why he asked. He feels your a good candidate so put your best foot forward and go for it.
    Like others have said, while you may not have the "paperwork" /degree be hind your name the op is here, you can get the paperwork later. Learn as you go along and imagine the experience you'll have under the belt. When you go back and do that degree you'll have practical experience to write that paper....BIG step up ahead of the rest of your class peers. Go for it!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 7:26 PM GMT
    looknrnd, based on the presentation of yourself I see on these boards, you are a bright and thoughtful guy. So it's gratifying to see that you've been noticed at work.

    Your concerns about your credentials may not be baseless - you might even be told later that you're slightly under-qualified, maybe by a company standard or requirement. But the experience will be valuable. Moreover, it has made you think of yourself as a "contender". Take that and wear it with pride. If the job doesn't develop for you, you've had a valuable experience, and been trained for the day it will.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2009 8:20 PM GMT
    Well in my experience i was hired to run a supervisory role right out of school and I wasn't sure i could do it. But everything is going swimmingly!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 07, 2009 10:52 PM GMT
    Thanks, guys!!!

    I really needed to hear all that. He asked me to put together a sort of Letter of Interest outlining what I bring to the table, and the changes I feel that need to be made to ensure the department is successful - as that wasn't happening. That's to sway Corporate skepticism. So, I did my best. We'll see how it goes.