Are the Economic troubles bringing about "MADE IN USA" loyalty for you?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 11:19 AM GMT
    I personally am trying to buy "MADE IN AMERICA" products particularly since this severe economic downturn. But my loyalty ends where the Auto industry vehicles are concerned because they cost too much in the first place, and they drain the pocket book to keep them on the road, mainly because of there gas consumption. Last year I bought an 07 Kia Rio that gets 39 miles to the gallon. If the US big 3 auto makers start making more efficient cars I'll consider buying one next. How about you guys? Do you buy foreign made cars for the savings, or would you buy American regardless of efficiency because of loyalty? (do any of you guys from other country's buy American made cars?)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 2:58 PM GMT
    we should all be buying American

    The whole "global economy" concept is Wall Street's way of euphemizing "sending jobs out of the country".

    This is misleading to the general American public while it boosts corporate (and investor) profits. Not necessary an evil thing, that is Wall Street's role.

    Think about it.

    However, there doesn't seem to be a big push on this from American companies. Why? Possibly because their profit margins are much higher when they have the crap made in China.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:00 PM GMT
    I somewhat have that ingrained in my being from the start. My family would murder me if I bought a foreign car. SERIOUSLY. I come from a quintessential Philadelphia blue collar family. We love our cheesteaks and our American pride. So I guess for me the current economic state just helps to reinforce that. I know when I buy things from American companies it has to be contributing to our future success as a nation. Call my old fashioned, but thats how I was raised.

    I also do understand that everything today is global. I know that parts of American cars are sourced from other countries. Alternatively I know that foreign car manufacturers are employing American citizens. When it comes down to it I would rather support an American company. They pay taxes to our country.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:05 PM GMT
    Not American, so no.

    This is a global website, remember icon_cool.gif

    That said, I find that on average locally made products cost more - or in the US auto case, lack the quality of imports.

    There are some fundamental purchases that will never come from the USA these days...things like TV's, iPod's - most electronics I guess. Would be hard to buy USA in some instances.

    And I won't be buying American beer anytime soon, either ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:26 PM GMT
    I've been trying to buy American for ~20 years, or so, but it ain't easy. So many essential product groups aren't even available from American manufacturers. What's more, many American companies have outsourced manufacturing, so even when buying "American" products, there is a pretty good chance that the product was actually made somewhere else. In my case, I check the labels and try to shy away from products made in unfriendly countries, or countries with sketchy human rights records. There just aren't many choices, these days.

    That said, I don't have a problem with us importing foreign products. The issue, though, lies with our increasing dependency on foreign suppliers. What happens when those countries either cut us off, or when they become embroiled in some sort of conflict that impedes their manufacturing capabilities? Finally, as pertains specifically to the auto and related industries, we absolutely need to maintain a healthy manufacturing sector, especially if we ever encounter another WWII "war effort" scenario, where companies like GM are re-focused on building planes, tanks and Humvees.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:27 PM GMT
    seanp7 saidNot American, so no.

    This is a global website, remember icon_cool.gif

    That said, I find that on average locally made products cost more - or in the US auto case, lack the quality of imports.

    There are some fundamental purchases that will never come from the USA these days...things like TV's, iPod's - most electronics I guess. Would be hard to buy USA in some instances.

    And I won't be buying American beer anytime soon, either ;)


    Touche'. icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    For many years I've chosen to buy American when I have that option, cars included. I've never had serious problems with an American car, although I did have some minor & correctible glitches with a 1982 Buick Park Avenue, and a 1984 Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser station wagon, both purchased new.

    The Ford I bought my partner for Christmas last year (I know, but that's what he wanted, he coulda had much nicer) now has 9000 miles on it, and not a single thing has gone wrong with it, nothing has needed adjustment, no squeaks, rattles or problems of any kind. Zip, zero, nada. And it gets great gas mileage.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:39 PM GMT
    I try to shop LOCAL as much as I can. I will pay more to purchase an item if it's from a Colorado-based company, I patronize the local businesses in my neighborhood, and I am militant about buying locally-grown produce.

    I'll allow myself to break that rule if the out-of-state firm if they have a significant presence here. (For instance, even though United Airlines is headquartered in IL, they have a major hub here and their economic presence in CO is very strong).

    Major goods are a little different, though. Take my HDTV as an example. The best manufacturers are from overseas! So, I buy the best quality, but I'll do it from a CO-based retailer.

    The American auto industry lost me years ago.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:40 PM GMT
    As an American, I don't remember being taught, as I grew up, that common sense, logic and education should be thrown out the window in favor of patriotism. It is the current outgoing administration that practically forced the reversal of that trend.
    I'll buy the best product in a class that I can afford. Were money no object, then I might be inclined to place a greater emphasis on "Made in the USA" than on quality. Unfortunately, that isn't the case, so I need to buy based on quality and reliability, because I can't afford to constantly replace items that are either too expensive or poorly designed/made simply because they are "Made in the USA"
    Just as a note regarding disclosure, I work for a US Fortune 500 manufacturing corporation that employs over 30,000 people.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:40 PM GMT
    What's more American, a Dodge made in Mexico or a Toyota made in America? With cars, the line gets blurred because of where they're built and where the components come from. I do my best to not buy goods from China (pretty hard to do, these days), but I have no loyalty to American auto makers. I love my '96 Dodge Ram 4x4, and I don't plan on ever selling it. But, in the next few months, I will likely buy a Toyota Yaris.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 3:47 PM GMT
    Me again.... just to point out....

    I'm really excited to see more info about the upcoming Chevy Volt. Its supposed to be groundbreaking!
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 06, 2009 3:59 PM GMT
    The Volt looks promising.

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    Jan 06, 2009 4:02 PM GMT
    I'm also excited about the Volt, but I'd rather let someone else beta test it.
  • MuslDrew

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    Jan 06, 2009 4:03 PM GMT
    I've been trying to buy American for years. There isn't a huge selection of goods manufactured in the USA at most prominent retailers. I patronize locally owned businesses when I can. they do a great job of supplying goods made locally, regionally or made elsewhere in the US.
  • DiverScience

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    Jan 06, 2009 4:06 PM GMT
    If Made in America products were actually made here, by companies that actually paid taxes here, and weren't piece of overpriced crap...

    then I would.

    But since they're not, and I'm a broke grad student... no.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Jan 06, 2009 4:09 PM GMT
    I shop at Walmart. icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 4:23 PM GMT
    COJock1974 saidI try to shop LOCAL as much as I can...

    Funny, some of my friends & I had this same discussion on Sunday. I mentioned that we always check with local merchants when we're shopping for certain items. We may still eventually buy from a national retailer based on the product & price, but we don't overlook the locals.

    We also tend to favor stores dedicated to a single kind of product, for instance, a local appliance store rather than a Home Depot or a Lowe's, or a local tire store rather than the auto department at Sears. And because locals will often negotiate the price while chains cannot, we always get a good price. Plus the local owner is someone we can count on in case we encounter a problem with the item, and quite often is someone we know personally.

    For instance, in the last 12 months, my partner & I have bought:

    *A dishwasher from a locally-owned appliance store (at a great price!)
    *2 computers from a computer store
    *A sewing machine from a locally-owned sewing machine store (gift for my partner, lessons included)
    *Outdoor BBQ grill from a locally-owned hardware store
    *Mattress set from a locally-owned mattress store
    *Business suit from a locally-owned men's clothing store
    *Art glass from a local artist

    We also patronize locally-owned restaurants & bars (either gay-owned or friendly), almost never going into national chains. For one thing we know most of the owners, plus we like our money staying in the immediate community. In fact, though living in populous Fort Lauderdale, we seldom spend our money among strangers. We live a surprisingly small-town life, despite the area this is.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 4:49 PM GMT
    We're a Toyota family and always will be. Never had a problem *knock on wood* with them. I drive a Yaris and its a great car. I say anyone looking for a car without all the bells and whistles to get one.

    I'm gonna make my next car an IS.. I'll never buy anything outside the Toyota/Lexus family.

    Toyota also has plants in Canada and the United States. And let me tell you, they're most likely giving more American's jobs these days since the big three took a hit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 4:49 PM GMT
    I don't buy anything solely based on where it's made. I buy it based on the design of the product, how it functions, the quality of it and how long said product will last. I work very hard for my money and I'm not going to throw it away on some crap product just because it's made in the USA.

    Actually, if US manufacturers would make better products that lasted longer and were designed appropriately, they might not be in the predicament they are in now. I think they became lackadaisical because they assumed because they were US, they'd be fine.

    Since I'm a designer, it's VERY rare that I can find unique products made in the US. Most of my stuff has to come from Germany, the UK or Italy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 6:07 PM GMT
    As others have pointed out... it's not easy to find products made in the USA. In a recent story about the country's largest port (it was about unsold foreign cars taking up all the storage space) they mentioned that the chief export is... used cardboard.

    When the longshoremen went on strike a few years ago, the Oregonian newspaper had a large "in depth" series about how we don't need ports or railroads anymore, because people who actually make stuff are so uncool. Much better to live on trust funds and be professional eco-tourists. Those lattes, chardonnays, and BMW's will just keep showing up, somehow...

    Anyway, when I bought a new car, I did shop around for an American-made model, but they all seemed kind of poorly made and rattly. I'm still driving the Toyota that I bought, nineteen years later.
  • EricLA

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    Jan 06, 2009 6:11 PM GMT
    I think it was of the news websites or maybe one of the political blogs, but they poised the question a few weeks ago about what "Made in the USA" even means now. Many (most?) of the parts found in US cars are manufactured in other countries, like Mexico. So, it's not like a lot of the manufacturing jobs are here in the US. The cars are assembled here, but so are a lot of Hondas, Toyotas, etc.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 7:36 PM GMT
    Manufacturing jobs represent a distant minority of US jobs. My bank employs thousands of people in the area so I repay my student loans and car loan through them in addition to checking and savings. I go to the local mom and pop grocery store. I buy local produce and dairy in season. The local economy is much more important to me than a Made in the USA label which is dubious to begin with.
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Jan 06, 2009 8:02 PM GMT
    DiverScience saidIf Made in America products were actually made here, by companies that actually paid taxes here, and weren't piece of overpriced crap...

    then I would.

    But since they're not, and I'm a broke grad student... no.



    Exactly. I make my decisions on independent stores vs big box.


    I try and keep my dollars in my town as opposed sent to corporate somewhere.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2009 8:20 PM GMT
    It goes in this order for me: "Made in Austin", and if not then "Made in Texas", and if not then "Made in America".

    (also support New England made products, when I'm up there)
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    Jan 06, 2009 8:29 PM GMT
    Hell to the no...

    Because nothing is exactly 100% anything. If the 3 wise men learned to make better, more reliable & reasonably attractive cars, as well as, products, then I would buy products that are "Made In The USA". I get to drive my best friend's 2006 Acura TL & that is something that I would get in a heartbeat. Personally, I haven't seen anything to compete with the Acura TL, ever. My loyalty is towards products that hold up their money's worth...like the Appleā„¢ iPod. As far as buying my next car, I will still be devoted to the imported guys & that's the bottom line.