HELP! Who Knows About Credit Cards? Husband Just Received One That Neither of Us Requested!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2014 11:04 PM GMT
    He just got a Capital One Platinum Card in the mail today with a credit line. He asked me if I requested it for him, and I don't know anything about it. Neither does he.

    I went through all the considerable paperwork accompanying it and can't find anything about monthly service fees, or interest rates. It says go online to activate it, or phone toll-free.

    We neither need nor want a credit card, or any kind of credit. We use a bank debit card for all our plastic and online purchases, on a strictly cash basis for everything we buy. Naturally I'm gonna phone them Monday and ask what this is about, and cancel it.

    But can this be some kinda scam by a third party? The letter to my husband says "...the card YOU requested" [my emphasis} but he requested nothing, so this shouldn't be an unsolicited offer of a card. I've heard they sometimes send them out to entice people to use them, but this specifically says "requested" and it's ready to use.

    Any thoughts? A mystery to us. icon_question.gif
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    May 31, 2014 11:06 PM GMT
    I used to get those all the time.

    If you don't want it, send it to me. Just don't call them and change any of the account information.
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    May 31, 2014 11:07 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI used to get those all the time.

    If you don't want it, send it to me. Just don't call them and change any of the account information.

    Did they say you requested those cards you got? That's what bothers us the most. Who requested this card in his name?
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    May 31, 2014 11:09 PM GMT
    Have you called Capital One to ask them about it? If a request was made, they should have a record of it.
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    May 31, 2014 11:10 PM GMT
    Did you have a Capital One card before? If yes, maybe you forgot to cancel the account, the card expired, and this is your new one.
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    May 31, 2014 11:11 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI used to get those all the time.

    If you don't want it, send it to me. Just don't call them and change any of the account information.

    Did they say you requested those cards you got? That's what bothers us the most. Who requested this card in his name?

    Well of course they'd say that, that's for the dim bulbs who don't remember and will then start using it. They want you to use it and pay all that interest.
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    May 31, 2014 11:12 PM GMT
    No need to wait until Monday; these places are 24x7 these days. I just had a conversation with Chase this morning about a fraudulent charge on my card.
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    May 31, 2014 11:17 PM GMT
    Years ago when they sent these out all the time someone got one after I'd moved out of a rental and they started using it. I found out years later when I was applying to rent a place through a realtor and he had a terminal hooked up to TRW, Equifax, or whoever it was back then and he got a printout of my credit history. There was a credit card in my "wife's" name; someone apparently claiming they were my wife. Getting it removed from my credit history was essentially impossible.
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    May 31, 2014 11:17 PM GMT
    Oh no!! icon_eek.gif


    They've already stolen your identity and created a new thread with the same title in your name!!
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    May 31, 2014 11:27 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidHe just got a Capital One Platinum Card in the mail today with a credit line. He asked me if I requested it for him, and I don't know anything about it. Neither does he.

    I went through all the considerable paperwork accompanying it and can't find anything about monthly service fees, or interest rates. It says go online to activate it, or phone toll-free.

    We neither need nor want a credit card, or any kind of credit. We use a bank debit card for all our plastic and online purchases, on a strictly cash basis for everything we buy. Naturally I'm gonna phone them Monday and ask what this is about, and cancel it.

    But can this be some kinda scam by a third party? The letter to my husband says "...the card YOU requested" [my emphasis} but he requested nothing, so this shouldn't be an unsolicited offer of a card. I've heard they sometimes send them out to entice people to use them, but this specifically says "requested" and it's ready to use.

    Any thoughts? A mystery to us. icon_question.gif

    icon_lol.gif
    Art, you're adorable. Why not just phone them now? Instead of waiting til Monday? customer service lines for credit cards are 24/7
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    May 31, 2014 11:27 PM GMT
    Nothing surprising Art, Capital One is one of the most corrupt financial services companies out there and can easily get all the data they need to send you a teaser card - just another day of doing business for them
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 31, 2014 11:30 PM GMT
    The card isn't "ready to use" until YOU activate it by calling the number on the card.
    If I were you, I would call Capital One (DO NOT CALL THE CARD ACTIVATION NUMBER), and tell them your situation. If you don't want the card, ask them what you should do with the it.
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    May 31, 2014 11:44 PM GMT
    With security now, worse than I suspected...
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    May 31, 2014 11:56 PM GMT
    I would suspect it's just a "teaser" card like others have said.
    Discover has been sending us multiple one's for weeks now.
    I finally called Thursday, enduring the on hold time to get us off their mailing list, afraid that indeed someone else may intercept the mail and activate one of them.
    It was fun telling them to go to hell, as they canceled us a few years back for non-use. We only got the card because it was the only one Sam's Club would honor.
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:00 AM GMT
    OK, here's the deal - definitely fraud. The goal apparently to get a card issued, that my husband would then activate. With the account information this person had created he hoped to be able to access my husband's new account online and get his card number, and begin making online purchases, for which no plastic card would be needed. Only 1 card was actually issued, sent here. Then my husband or Capital One would be stuck with the bills.

    Among the clues is that our address omitted our condo number. We would never have done that because the mail may not reach us without that number, a substitute mail carrier not knowing which mail box is ours. We only got this because our regular carrier was working today.

    So Capital One has canceled the account. They are initiating an internal investigation and will call us back within 72 with the results. I hope to learn how, when and where this was done, though I doubt I'll learn by whom. Most alarming was that they did have my husband's correct social security number.
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:16 AM GMT
    tj85016 saidNothing surprising Art, Capital One is one of the most corrupt financial services companies out there and can easily get all the data they need to send you a teaser card - just another day of doing business for them

    As I wrote above, Capital One just told me it wasn't a teaser card, but a fraud attempt. Thanks everyone for advising me, and encouraging me to phone immediately. I was gonna wait until Monday, assuming I'd get little results on a weekend, plus I wanted to get some insight from you guys before phoning (I really do rely upon your opinions & experience). But we got the card cancelled and an investigation started, so a productive call. Another lesson we can share here, though I hope it doesn't happen to any of you.
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:19 AM GMT
    Import saidArt, you're adorable. Why not just phone them now? Instead of waiting til Monday? customer service lines for credit cards are 24/7

    Art_Deco's mental image of who he's calling:

    Accountant-Green-Visor1.jpg
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:27 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Import saidArt, you're adorable. Why not just phone them now? Instead of waiting til Monday? customer service lines for credit cards are 24/7

    Art_Deco's mental image of who he's calling:

    Accountant-Green-Visor1.jpg

    LMAO! Thanks, that made me laugh, something to break the tension I was feeling. icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:29 AM GMT
    I'm not even sure I'd believe Capital One's story about the scam; they could be using that to make people believe that they're not as sleazy as they really are.
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    Jun 01, 2014 12:45 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI'm not even sure I'd believe Capital One's story about the scam; they could be using that to make people believe that they're not as sleazy as they really are.

    I suppose possible, but that would be exposing them to some serious fraud charges of their own. And have to explain how they got my husband's SSN. They may be able to get addresses for mailing out advertising materials & offers, but acquiring the SSN of non-customers without their permission is a big no-no. And if they're now lying to cover-up that crime I think my husband may be looking at a big financial windfall in his favor.

    No, I really think, given some other past security breaches of my husband's bank accounts, and mine, that this was genuine external fraud.
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    Jun 01, 2014 1:08 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI'm not even sure I'd believe Capital One's story about the scam; they could be using that to make people believe that they're not as sleazy as they really are.

    I suppose possible, but that would be exposing them to some serious fraud charges of their own. And have to explain how they got my husband's SSN. They may be able to get addresses for mailing out advertising materials & offers, but acquiring the SSN of non-customers without their permission is a big no-no. And if they're now lying to cover-up that crime I think my husband may be looking at a big financial windfall in his favor.

    I think you have a rather rosy view of the banking industry. Everyone has your SSN. They've got all of your information, and they've got their asses covered.
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    Jun 01, 2014 1:59 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    I think you have a rather rosy view of the banking industry. Everyone has your SSN. They've got all of your information, and they've got their asses covered.

    Shortly after I joined the US Army the old system of individual service serial numbers they issued to us was replaced by using our social security numbers instead. And we'd be reciting that number out loud all over the place and for every purpose. And stenciling it on our duffle bags along with our names, and almost everything else we possessed.

    Plus our families & friends were told to write the SSN on mail they sent to us, to support what we called "post locator services" that allowed easier forwarding of mail to soldiers who frequently relocated. And also for family to physically find us at our new units of assignment, since family often couldn't keep track of us, and as civilians they would mangle our unit IDs, getting them all wrong, and have no idea where their sons were assigned. And so there was our SSN on all our mail, for all the world to see.

    And we had to write it on our personal checks for purchases at the PX and commissary. So that some soldiers had the bank print their SSN along with their address on their checks, to save time at the register. Checks that they also used and sent everywhere else in the civilian community. Can you imagine doing that today?

    BTW, some years ago the military went back to separate serial numbers, because of SSN privacy concerns. Shows how little identity theft there was decades ago, we were all so open and unconcerned with the concept. Today I have a paper shredder sitting here and shred every bit of personal material before I throw it out.
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    Jun 01, 2014 4:08 AM GMT
    Yup. I'd guess that most guys who were in the military when we were using our SSN for everything can still instantly recite their SSN if asked for it. I lost my social security card aeons ago but it didn't matter since I have it memorized.

    But now banks and everyone else are using it so it's widely accessible. Financial institutions especially can instantly get your SSN.
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    Jun 01, 2014 4:56 AM GMT
    icon_neutral.gif Dunno. I get junk mail from "Capital One" at least twice a week. I never open the envelopes.

    BTW: I had to dig up my Mom's pre-SSN Army serial number today. Sort of proud of myself for actually finding it!
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    Jun 01, 2014 5:19 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidYup. I'd guess that most guys who were in the military when we were using our SSN for everything can still instantly recite their SSN if asked for it. I lost my social security card aeons ago but it didn't matter since I have it memorized.

    But now banks and everyone else are using it so it's widely accessible. Financial institutions especially can instantly get your SSN.

    Oh, sure, I can give my SSN as easily as spell my name. I also have my husband's memorized. But of course I also had to memorize my original Army serial number, too, before we used SSNs. Something the Drill Sergeants would unexpectedly demand we recite:

    "Soldier, what's your serial number? Don't look at your dog tags! They're for me to look at, not you! Gimme those things!"

    "RA 638936... ah, 936... 936..."
    "Drop and give me 20!"
    "Yes, Drill Sergeant! 1, Drill Sergeant, 2 Drill Sergeant, 3 Drill Sergeant, 4 Drill Sergeant..."

    You learned your serial number very quickly. Though actually I don't recall mine today, and I have no paperwork with it today.