Improper weight balance?

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    Jan 07, 2009 1:52 AM GMT
    I noticed while I was doing free weights that I shift my weight forward and am using my toes for balance a lot. I've had some shoulder troubles since the summer and took off lifting altogether for most of it, just starting to get back after seeing the doctor a couple times and him doing nothing. Am I supposed to be more planted on my heel when lifting?
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    Jan 07, 2009 2:24 AM GMT
    well, shifting to the ball of your feet isn't "bad" as in "OMG your going to fuck your self up" but, depending on what your doing it can change the focus of the muscle your attempting to target.

    Generally you want to keep the weight on the heals of your feet, pushing through your heals, if you find your self struggling, curl up your toes (although I wouldn't recommend doing this with heavy weights and say squats)

    I will push from the ball of my foot when I'm just not in the right frame of mind to be doing things like squats..

    maybe take some time to use lighter weights and focus of form instead.

    if your doign this while say, curling (lots of guys do this at the gym, look like there about to fall over hehehe) split your stance..
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    Jan 07, 2009 4:33 AM GMT
    Now that was some really useful gym advice.

    I wish we had more discussion about sports and weights in this website.

    Thanks liltanker
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    Jan 07, 2009 4:45 AM GMT
    Although you never gave any detail, if you're having shoulder issues, you may wish to study up on shoulder impingement.

    I've seen countless clueless lifters over the years mess up their shoulder region by over developing the anterior deltoids via bench press, and shoulder presses in front. That's pure craziness, and causes your shoulder to roll forward because of the excessive development on the anterior side and to "impinge" the joint.

    You ALWAYS need to work the antagonist (in this case the posterior deltoids and upper back) to maintain a muscular balance front to back, or side to side.

    If you have shoulder issues forget the flat bench press (it's horrible), and forget shoulders press in the front. They will only cause you pain and suffering. Concentrate on full range, independent movement such as dumbbells incline presses, and decline dumbbels presses, along with dumbbells shoulder presses through the full range of motion, along with reverse flies with dumbbells.

    If you have pain in your attachment, stimulate blood flow and capillarization by doing higher-rep activity (8 on up).

    Always, always, always, do a full range of motion (don't lift like a moron), and stretch at the END of your workout.
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    Jan 07, 2009 4:51 AM GMT
    Finally. A true RJ topic.

    Now lets get ripped!icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 07, 2009 5:46 AM GMT
    I've always done a full range of motion on pretty much everything, but I know there's a school that believes on certain exercises, including various bench presses, it's better not to do a full range of motion.

    Personally, I've used dumbbells for my bench presses almost exclusively for more than 20 years. I've gone through periods when I also incorporated barbell or Smith machine presses, but I always go back to just dumbbells.

    As flex210 says, it probably is very important to make sure you work the posterior delts. And to stretch at the end of your workout.
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    Jan 07, 2009 5:54 AM GMT
    flex210 saidAlthough you never gave any detail, if you're having shoulder issues, you may wish to study up on shoulder impingement.

    I've seen countless clueless lifters over the years mess up their shoulder region by over developing the anterior deltoids via bench press, and shoulder presses in front. That's pure craziness, and causes your shoulder to roll forward because of the excessive development on the anterior side and to "impinge" the joint.

    You ALWAYS need to work the antagonist (in this case the posterior deltoids and upper back) to maintain a muscular balance front to back, or side to side.

    If you have shoulder issues forget the flat bench press (it's horrible), and forget shoulders press in the front. They will only cause you pain and suffering. Concentrate on full range, independent movement such as dumbbells incline presses, and decline dumbbels presses, along with dumbbells shoulder presses through the full range of motion, along with reverse flies with dumbbells.

    If you have pain in your attachment, stimulate blood flow and capillarization by doing higher-rep activity (8 on up).

    Always, always, always, do a full range of motion (don't lift like a moron), and stretch at the END of your workout.


    Thanks for the responses so far guys!

    Actually the physical therapist I saw said I am kind of hunched forward and I need to work out my back more.

    He also mentioned that I do 2 sets of 30 for every back workout. It's pretty tough to do and I've gone back to 3 sets of 10. Any one have any suggestions for that?
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    Jan 07, 2009 6:08 AM GMT
    Sean_85 saidFinally. A true RJ topic.

    Now lets get ripped!icon_biggrin.gif



    I think this thread would be better if it was:

    "Guess if the guy above you pushes from the heel or toe when he does free weights"

    Or...

    "Old guy creepers leaning forward on their toes doing free weights"

    Or...

    "Younger guys on toes with older guys on heels, is this normal?"

    ...

    OK I'll stop now icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 07, 2009 6:16 AM GMT
    rockytopgophers said
    flex210 saidAlthough you never gave any detail, if you're having shoulder issues, you may wish to study up on shoulder impingement.

    I've seen countless clueless lifters over the years mess up their shoulder region by over developing the anterior deltoids via bench press, and shoulder presses in front. That's pure craziness, and causes your shoulder to roll forward because of the excessive development on the anterior side and to "impinge" the joint.

    You ALWAYS need to work the antagonist (in this case the posterior deltoids and upper back) to maintain a muscular balance front to back, or side to side.

    If you have shoulder issues forget the flat bench press (it's horrible), and forget shoulders press in the front. They will only cause you pain and suffering. Concentrate on full range, independent movement such as dumbbells incline presses, and decline dumbbels presses, along with dumbbells shoulder presses through the full range of motion, along with reverse flies with dumbbells.

    If you have pain in your attachment, stimulate blood flow and capillarization by doing higher-rep activity (8 on up).

    Always, always, always, do a full range of motion (don't lift like a moron), and stretch at the END of your workout.


    Thanks for the responses so far guys!

    Actually the physical therapist I saw said I am kind of hunched forward and I need to work out my back more.

    He also mentioned that I do 2 sets of 30 for every back workout. It's pretty tough to do and I've gone back to 3 sets of 10. Any one have any suggestions for that?


    Two sets of 30 on what exercise? Have I missed something?
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    Jan 07, 2009 6:17 AM GMT
    I feel guilty for messing with a serious thread, so to make amends, I'll talk out my ass on one of your questions:

    rockytopgophers saidHe also mentioned that I do 2 sets of 30 for every back workout. It's pretty tough to do and I've gone back to 3 sets of 10. Any one have any suggestions for that?


    I'm guessing the reason your PT wanted you to do this was to help correct your "hunch over" -- this means strength and endurance in your back, not a "big" back.

    So, I think you should pay attention to your PT. If it's hard to do 30 reps, then you need to reduce the weight.

    Did your PT suggest any body weight only exercises? Like laying face down on the floor with your arms/hands at your sides, then lifting your head and your feet off the ground and holding for as long as you can? This is a core back stabilizer strengthening move and my guess is this will be extreeeemly difficult for you. If it is, then... guess what I'm going to suggest?

    ...

    OK, I won't make you guess. Any move that is difficult is the one you need to be doing. It could take a year to do it well, but that is a year that is well spent. In your case, your posture and your center of gravity in the front/back axis likely needs to shift back, given the propensity to hold your weight towards the front of your feet.

    OK. That's my ass talking. Pretty good for an ass, huh?
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    Jan 07, 2009 6:23 AM GMT
    iguanaSF said
    Sean_85 saidFinally. A true RJ topic.

    Now lets get ripped!icon_biggrin.gif



    I think this thread would be better if it was:

    "Guess if the guy above you pushes from the heel or toe when he does free weights"

    Or...

    "Old guy creepers leaning forward on their toes doing free weights"

    Or...

    "Younger guys on toes with older guys on heels, is this normal?"

    ...

    OK I'll stop now icon_smile.gif


    Cowboy: I lost my grip doing my chinups and I fell on my heels and twisted my back.

    Emory: You shouldn't wear heels when you're doing chinups.

    [Boys in the Band by Mart Crowley]
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    Jan 07, 2009 5:37 PM GMT
    Please be so kind as to tell the group in detail, your workout.

    It sounds like I nailed your imbalance.

    Now, give us the details.