Are you into your culture at all?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:37 AM GMT
    Is anyone here active in their culture? or always learning more about it.

    It's something I've always been interested in since i was younger. That probably has to do with the fact i spent my summer with my grandparents in Japan. I feel in love with Japanese culture, history, music, movies, food etc.

    I still have a great respect and love for it as well. Whatever your culture happens to be... are you active in it? did you ever learn the history of where you came from? what made you want to learn more? do you preserve it at all?
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:47 AM GMT
    Not even a little bit. Most of my family is very fundamentalist Christian, so I stray away from any cultural things that remind me of that. Sadly enough, I don't even celebrate Christmas (though my friends and I do exchange gifts).
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jun 12, 2014 2:50 AM GMT
    I eat hamburgers, the occasional apple pie, and watch fireworks on the 4th, does that count? icon_neutral.gif
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:51 AM GMT
    Not really into culture and traditions. I like to have my own identity.
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:53 AM GMT
    kevex saidNot really into culture and traditions. I like to have my own identity.
    fig,slate,mens,ffffff.u1.jpg
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:55 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    kevex saidNot really into culture and traditions. I like to have my own identity.
    fig,slate,mens,ffffff.u1.jpg


    lol The irony
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    Jun 12, 2014 2:58 AM GMT
    kevex saidlol The irony
    Right? icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:07 AM GMT
    MikeW saidI eat hamburgers, the occasional apple pie, and watch fireworks on the 4th, does that count? icon_neutral.gif


    haha! the all American culture icon_smile.gif you just forgot baseball...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:45 AM GMT
    My culture growing up was New Jersey. So naturally I've tried to forget it, and erase it.

    I've been a cultural orphan ever since. I think in the final analysis I've simply created my own culture, and live as an observer in the cultures that other peoples have. Borrowing some elements, rejecting others, inventing what's lacking.
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:52 AM GMT
    lifeduringwartime23 saidIs anyone here active in their culture? or always learning more about it.

    It's something I've always been interested in since i was younger. That probably has to do with the fact i spent my summer with my grandparents in Japan. I feel in love with Japanese culture, history, music, movies, food etc.

    I still have a great respect and love for it as well. Whatever your culture happens to be... are you active in it? did you ever learn the history of where you came from? what made you want to learn more? do you preserve it at all?


    well, i do like looking at hot japanese guys hhaahha.

    and im not really into chinese (pop) culture, it kind of sucks. i like kpop and jpop and jdrama better. food is okay in those 3 clutures though
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:56 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    kevex saidNot really into culture and traditions. I like to have my own identity.
    fig,slate,mens,ffffff.u1.jpg


    I want to be a non-confirmist, just like everyone else. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:58 AM GMT
    Having lived in Asia for 16 years and in the US for 21 years, sometimes I feel like I lost my cultural identity. I can't be totally American. Yet when I go back to visit my country, I don't feel completely fit in either. icon_confused.gif
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    Jun 12, 2014 3:59 AM GMT
    polfsky said
    paulflexes said
    kevex saidNot really into culture and traditions. I like to have my own identity.
    fig,slate,mens,ffffff.u1.jpg


    I want to be a non-confirmist, just like everyone else. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif


    But hey, by being an individual, you can come up with your own style and own "culture". icon_lol.gif You can still be unique.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:06 AM GMT
    Yeah, definitely. I come from an italian family from both sides mother and father and yeah very proud of my roots, and it helps to live in a country with strong italian influences too. As uruguayan I drink mate, play football and Im always late = 100% uruguayan and proud.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:06 AM GMT
    polfsky saidHaving lived in Asia for 16 years and in the US for 21 years, sometimes I feel like I lost my cultural identity. I can't be totally American. Yet when I go back to visit my country, I don't feel completely fit in either. icon_confused.gif
    That sounds like my neighbor. He grew up in soviet Russia, and has lived in the US for a little over 20 years. He still has trouble with English, and his family tells him that his Russian sucks, too, so he's basically language-less. icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:09 AM GMT
    David3K saidYeah, definitely. I come from an italian family from both sides mother and father and yeah very proud of my roots, also live in a country with many italian traditions. As uruguayan I drink mate, play football and Im always late so 100% uruguayan and proud.


    Che! Pasa me un amargo, boludo!
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:11 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThat sounds like my neighbor. He grew up in soviet Russia, and has lived in the US for a little over 20 years. He still has trouble with English, and his family tells him that his Russian sucks, too, so he's basically language-less. icon_lol.gif


    Yah, I know how that is. My English has an accent, and I can't keep up with the new lingo and slang of my native tongue. When I go back, some people say I speak weird too. Ughhh. icon_mad.gif
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:11 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    David3K saidYeah, definitely. I come from an italian family from both sides mother and father and yeah very proud of my roots, also live in a country with many italian traditions. As uruguayan I drink mate, play football and Im always late so 100% uruguayan and proud.

    Che! Pasa me un amargo, boludo!

    Enseguida pibe pero aca va con termo y no pava!
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:12 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    polfsky saidHaving lived in Asia for 16 years and in the US for 21 years, sometimes I feel like I lost my cultural identity. I can't be totally American. Yet when I go back to visit my country, I don't feel completely fit in either. icon_confused.gif
    That sounds like my neighbor. He grew up in soviet Russia, and has lived in the US for a little over 20 years. He still has trouble with English, and his family tells him that his Russian sucks, too, so he's basically language-less. icon_lol.gif


    My father is from Shanghai and found himself in the United States in the early 1950's (at about age 24ish) when Mao decided to take over grandfather's factories. At 87, my father has lived most of his life in the United States and still speaks with an accent.

    I love the way he speaks. It is a blessing every time I get to hear his voice.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:12 AM GMT
    polfsky said
    paulflexes saidThat sounds like my neighbor. He grew up in soviet Russia, and has lived in the US for a little over 20 years. He still has trouble with English, and his family tells him that his Russian sucks, too, so he's basically language-less. icon_lol.gif


    Yah, I know how that is. My English has an accent, and I can't keep up with the new lingo and slang of my native tongue. When I go back, some people say I speak weird too. Ughhh. icon_mad.gif


    What part of Asia do you come from?
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:14 AM GMT
    i thought this was about gay culture. i always joke that i'm a 'bad gay' because i don't like musicals and..stuff..

    i do pay special attention to gay history and the equality movement though. that feels important.

    other culture is mostly irish, and i'd like to visit ireland but it feels like irish stuff is corrupted here (lucky fucking charms..) so i don't feel too connected to it icon_confused.gif
  • Trontastic

    Posts: 135

    Jun 12, 2014 4:17 AM GMT
    I live in Australia, so... what culture? I mean, I drink, but that's about it.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    GAMRican said

    My father is from Shanghai and found himself in the United States in the early 1950's (at about age 24ish) when Mao decided to take over grandfather's factories. At 87, my father has lived most of his life in the United States and still speaks with an accent.

    I love the way he speaks. It is a blessing every time I get to hear his voice.


    That's a wonderful thing that you cherish the way your dad speaks. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    David3K said
    GAMRican said
    David3K saidYeah, definitely. I come from an italian family from both sides mother and father and yeah very proud of my roots, also live in a country with many italian traditions. As uruguayan I drink mate, play football and Im always late so 100% uruguayan and proud.

    Che! Pasa me un amargo, boludo!

    Enseguida pibe pero aca va con termo y no pava icon_cool.gif


    Como la otra definicion de la palabra "boludo", cuando compre mis dos mates en mi viaje pasada...
    todo fue hecho de "palo santo", pero no compre bombillas! Ay! Pero lo hice temporada todo en estilo "criollo" para cinco dias.

    Hay esperanza para mi????
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2014 4:22 AM GMT
    Good to see all your responses so far icon_smile.gif hope to respond to most of y'all in a little bit. I love hearing about the opinion on culture! and if you feel invested, or try to just be who are without it.