Anyone know anything about being a Nurse Practitioner?

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    Jun 13, 2014 10:10 PM GMT
    I'm thinking I want to become a Nurse Practitioner. I'm currently deciding on whether I should go back to school or not (see this thread), but I keep hearing that Nursing is a bad idea and you obviously have to become an RN before you can become a Nurse Practitioner.
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    Jun 13, 2014 10:33 PM GMT
    I nursed a hawk back to health once after finding it with a broken wing.
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    Jun 13, 2014 10:34 PM GMT
    You never do mention the prairie dog....icon_sad.gif
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    Jun 13, 2014 10:36 PM GMT
    ant811 saidI'm thinking I want to become a Nurse Practitioner. I'm currently deciding on whether I should go back to school or not (see this thread), but I keep hearing that Nursing is a bad idea and you obviously have to become an RN before you can become a Nurse Practitioner.


    Can you elaborate on why it's a bad idea? I only heard that it's always in demand and the pay is very decent.

    Two of my friends just finished their nursing program, one with LVN and the other Associate Degree in Nursing. They both said they need to keep going for at least a bachelor's degree in nursing to be competitive and marketable.
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    Jun 13, 2014 10:43 PM GMT
    bon_pan saidYou never do mention the prairie dog....icon_sad.gif
    It got out of the cage after a few weeks while I was asleep, and my dog "loved it to death." Literally. I woke up, and it was lying dead beside her.
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    Jun 14, 2014 12:54 AM GMT
    Yes. Nurse Practitioners do.
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    Jun 14, 2014 8:21 PM GMT
    polfsky said
    ant811 saidI'm thinking I want to become a Nurse Practitioner. I'm currently deciding on whether I should go back to school or not (see this thread), but I keep hearing that Nursing is a bad idea and you obviously have to become an RN before you can become a Nurse Practitioner.


    Can you elaborate on why it's a bad idea? I only heard that it's always in demand and the pay is very decent.

    Two of my friends just finished their nursing program, one with LVN and the other Associate Degree in Nursing. They both said they need to keep going for at least a bachelor's degree in nursing to be competitive and marketable.


    Well apparently in the previous thread I made (that I linked in my opening post), several people mentioned that there really is no shortage of nurses and that it isn't in demand, and it's actually kind of difficult to land a nursing job after graduating.
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    Jun 14, 2014 8:26 PM GMT
    ant811 said
    polfsky said
    ant811 saidI'm thinking I want to become a Nurse Practitioner. I'm currently deciding on whether I should go back to school or not (see this thread), but I keep hearing that Nursing is a bad idea and you obviously have to become an RN before you can become a Nurse Practitioner.


    Can you elaborate on why it's a bad idea? I only heard that it's always in demand and the pay is very decent.

    Two of my friends just finished their nursing program, one with LVN and the other Associate Degree in Nursing. They both said they need to keep going for at least a bachelor's degree in nursing to be competitive and marketable.


    Well apparently in the previous thread I made (that I linked in my opening post), several people mentioned that there really is no shortage of nurses and that it isn't in demand, and it's actually kind of difficult to land a nursing job after graduating.


    That's the problem. There are already too much nurses and paramedics. The same goes to lawyers, criminologists, architects, school teachers , etc.
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    Jun 14, 2014 8:33 PM GMT
    I keep reading y'all post stuff like "there's no shortage in nursing."

    Well, if any of you have been to a hospital lately, you'll realize that's true. However, you'll also realize there IS a shortage of GOOD nurses.

    That said, if you want a career in nursing, do your damndest to be a GOOD nurse and you'll have no trouble finding work.
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    Jun 14, 2014 8:54 PM GMT
    My sister is one. She makes a six-figure salary. She has a lot of education, though, including a masters degree in nursing so I'm not sure if having a university degree is a requirement but I'm guessing it is.
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    Jun 15, 2014 7:51 AM GMT
    ant811,

    Being a nurse (LPN, RN without a B.S., or RN with a B.S.) is not such a great thing.

    LPNs (licensed practical nurses) and RNs with Associate's Degrees have a difficult time finding good jobs, and the ones they do find are at the low end of nursing.

    An RN with a B.S. in nursing can find better jobs, but the work is still tough. You might be on your feet all day, or you might be sitting at a desk in an HMO doing telephone triage for 8 hours, listening to people's complaints, deciding if they need to be seen that day, and (if so) looking at computerized schedules trying to fit them into an MD's, PA's, or NP's schedule that day.

    If you really want interesting work in nursing, I'd suggest becoming an N.P. There will be a growing shortage of primary care providers (MDs, PAs, and NPs) with increasing insurance coverage, and NPs will have an expanded role in the new medical marketplace, with more freedom to diagnose and prescribe independently of doctors, at least in some states.

    The traditional route to becoming an NP was to get a B.S. in nursing (RN) and then a master's degree in nursing (NP).

    Now you can skip the RN part and go from high school or other background to NP. Search for "accelerated" or "fast track" NP programs. Be prepared to pay huge amounts for tuition, as for any college degree.
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    Jun 15, 2014 12:56 PM GMT
    Ok
    so you only listened to One guy.
    I'm not sure why you're getting this dis-information; maybe it's locational, but I find that hard to believe as these other states are using a lot of travel nurses(often paid a lot more).
    I think you said you've already accumulated a mass of student loan debt and as such you may want to get to work as soon as possible--maybe by getting Medical Assistant certificate. This way you'll get in the field and really see what parts you like and don't like.
    As for Nurse Practitioner; there are a few hospitals that are paying for you to go.
    My partners last job paid for his BSN, from RN.
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    Jun 15, 2014 6:22 PM GMT
    RPearson saidant811,

    Being a nurse (LPN, RN without a B.S., or RN with a B.S.) is not such a great thing.

    LPNs (licensed practical nurses) and RNs with Associate's Degrees have a difficult time finding good jobs, and the ones they do find are at the low end of nursing.

    An RN with a B.S. in nursing can find better jobs, but the work is still tough. You might be on your feet all day, or you might be sitting at a desk in an HMO doing telephone triage for 8 hours, listening to people's complaints, deciding if they need to be seen that day, and (if so) looking at computerized schedules trying to fit them into an MD's, PA's, or NP's schedule that day.

    If you really want interesting work in nursing, I'd suggest becoming an N.P. There will be a growing shortage of primary care providers (MDs, PAs, and NPs) with increasing insurance coverage, and NPs will have an expanded role in the new medical marketplace, with more freedom to diagnose and prescribe independently of doctors, at least in some states.

    The traditional route to becoming an NP was to get a B.S. in nursing (RN) and then a master's degree in nursing (NP).

    Now you can skip the RN part and go from high school or other background to NP. Search for "accelerated" or "fast track" NP programs. Be prepared to pay huge amounts for tuition, as for any college degree.


    Yes, definitely more interested in being a NP than a RN. Thanks for the info, I'll look into it!
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    Jun 15, 2014 10:08 PM GMT
    dustin_K_tx saidOk
    so you only listened to One guy.
    I'm not sure why you're getting this dis-information; maybe it's locational, but I find that hard to believe as these other states are using a lot of travel nurses(often paid a lot more).
    I think you said you've already accumulated a mass of student loan debt and as such you may want to get to work as soon as possible--maybe by getting Medical Assistant certificate. This way you'll get in the field and really see what parts you like and don't like.
    As for Nurse Practitioner; there are a few hospitals that are paying for you to go.
    My partners last job paid for his BSN, from RN.


    I'm not gonna waste money on a Medical Assistant program to make $12-$15 an hour. I'd just stay at my current job if that were the case.