Traitor swap

  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 15, 2014 2:45 PM GMT
    How many men here think it was wise to trade a traitor for 5 of our enemies?
    Are you still drinking the Obama kool-aid after that?
    I would really like to hear from our military men as well as others.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 15, 2014 3:20 PM GMT
    Dems don't want to chime in?

    Because he fucked up folks. This puts every servicemen at greater risk and it is an insult to non traitors from WWII and Vietnam who spents many more years in capture.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jun 15, 2014 3:27 PM GMT
    arguing with a clueless fool is never interesting OP
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    Jun 15, 2014 4:14 PM GMT
    tj85016 saidarguing with a clueless fool is never interesting OP

    + a billion
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jun 15, 2014 4:26 PM GMT
    So you really honestly believe a president of the United States (regardless of his political affiliation) makes decisions concerning US interests a) in a vacuum and b) with no more intelligence (that is, critical information from intelligence sources within the military and beyond) than one can find watching FOX news? Whatever FOX or any other news source has told you, neither you nor I nor anyone else in the public has any idea what discussions took place at various levels of government to arrive at this agreement. Anyone who thinks presidents make uninformed unilateral decisions regarding such matters is truly ignorant. You may not agree with the decision, everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but that is all it is: An opinion based on limited information.
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    Jun 15, 2014 4:29 PM GMT
    As an Autralian sharing my life between the 2 countries , i will say that it is always easy to criticize what others do ..
    Said that , i have seen in the last 4 years,a progress in how America has been coming out of the slump , most of my crewmates have get back to a easy life . I am glad the U.S troops are back from Irak (4000 of them died over there) and look at what Irak is going thru lately .
    Hope the gouvernment calls back fast enough the troops suffering in Afghanistan !
    I am not a Democrat or a republican anything else , Most of the politicians are more or less a crook in disguise ..lol...
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jun 15, 2014 4:32 PM GMT
    neffa saidMost of the politicians are more or less a crook in disguise ..lol...

    You can't play in the mud and not get dirty. Power is the ability to get things done whether other people like it or not.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 16, 2014 10:30 AM GMT
    Deserter, not traitor. There is a sharp difference.
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    Jun 16, 2014 2:18 PM GMT
    the government says Snowden is a traitor
    so
    how should we treat a deserter:

    Edward Snowden nominated for Nobel peace prize
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/29/edward-snowden-nominated-nobel-peace-prize
    Edward-Snowden-008.jpg

    old men fight wars, the young men survive them
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    Jun 16, 2014 2:39 PM GMT
    MikeW saidSo you really honestly believe a president of the United States (regardless of his political affiliation) makes decisions concerning US interests a) in a vacuum and b) with no more intelligence (that is, critical information from intelligence sources within the military and beyond) than one can find watching FOX news? Whatever FOX or any other news source has told you, neither you nor I nor anyone else in the public has any idea what discussions took place at various levels of government to arrive at this agreement. Anyone who thinks presidents make uninformed unilateral decisions regarding such matters is truly ignorant. You may not agree with the decision, everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but that is all it is: An opinion based on limited information.


    This.
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    Jun 16, 2014 3:52 PM GMT
    MikemikeMike saidHow many men here think it was wise to trade a traitor for 5 of our enemies?
    Are you still drinking the Obama kool-aid after that?
    I would really like to hear from our military men as well as others.


    OP, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE.

    A lesser citizen might refrain from criticizing a soldier who served in Afghanistan BUT NOT YOU.

    You bravely type and post.

    WE SALUTE YOU.
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    Jun 17, 2014 2:23 AM GMT
    MikemikeMike: How many men here think it was wise to trade a traitor for 5 of our enemies?
    Are you still drinking the Obama kool-aid after that?
    I would really like to hear from our military men as well as others.


    ImageProxy.mvc?bicild=&canary=dpKZgOTI66
    Welcome-to-GITMO.jpg

    As an honorably discharged veteran, I'd say this is more of the traitorous Left's war on the U.S., especially the U.S. military.

    The Left loves to demoralize the military, hollow it out, girlify it, cut its budgets, cancel programs, and use it for every nitwit social engineering experiment they can imagine.

    Maobama looks like the best friend radical Islam has.

    I'd say he fits the definition of a traitor: one who aids and abets America's enemies.

    The Left loved the defeat in Vietnam so much that they are drooling at the prospect of two more Vietnams in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    The responses to your topic show why moderate and conservative guys should waste less time at RJ.

    More and more, RJ stands for Rainbow Jihadists.

    The Rainbow Jihadists support the impeachable jerk in the White House.

    They aren't concerned about the jerk releasing five bin Ladens.

    The jerk and the Rainbow Jihadists aren't concerned with terrorists taking over Iraq and Afghanistan.

    No. They're busy hating Christians and conservatives, especially the Tea Party.

    Rainbow Jihadists would rather attack you.
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    Jun 17, 2014 2:21 PM GMT
    NorthwestBoy1980 said ... is idiotic unless you look at it through the reality that everything Obama does is political calculation based on how it will benefit him.
    you off the boat or something? At least your naive how the political system is working:
    fob-shanghai.jpg
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    Jun 21, 2014 2:10 AM GMT
    jockfever saidMikemikeMike: How many men here think it was wise to trade a traitor for 5 of our enemies?
    Are you still drinking the Obama kool-aid after that?
    I would really like to hear from our military men as well as others.


    .


    You did, right above your post. In fact USMC!
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    Jun 21, 2014 6:22 AM GMT
    pellaz saidthe government says Snowden is a traitor
    so
    how should we treat a deserter:

    Edward Snowden nominated for Nobel peace prize
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/29/edward-snowden-nominated-nobel-peace-prize
    Edward-Snowden-008.jpg

    old men fight wars, the young men survive them


    I like him, I really like him for exposing the truth. Not surprised Mr Obama wants his head, for what he exposed.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jun 21, 2014 6:45 AM GMT
    Yes it was wise because there were no charges brought against them. They were merely being detained. And they have now been brainwashed, though they do not know it. They are America's secret weapon. They will unknowingly be doing exactly what we want them to do. And the implanted nanobots are completely undetectable and will allow us to monitor their every move as well as those around them. This plan has been in the works for years. Sometimes what you see is not what is really happening.
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    Jun 21, 2014 9:16 AM GMT
    I think it was a wise move. The continued imprisonment of a US soldier by the Taliban after the withdrawal of US forces from Afghanistan would have been an embarrassment to the US, which could have rumbled on for years to come. Just because his return was not in circumstances befitting a ticker-tape parade does not mean it was not necessary.

    As for the five released Taliban, should they step out of line, they may well find themselves on the receiving end of a Predator strike.

    This move does not set any precedents. America has been exchanging POWs since the Revolutionary War and Reagan was negotiating with terrorists 30 years ago (even though he was really bad at it).
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    Jun 23, 2014 9:40 AM GMT
    Samintown said
    MikemikeMike saidHow many men here think it was wise to trade a traitor for 5 of our enemies?
    Are you still drinking the Obama kool-aid after that?
    I would really like to hear from our military men as well as others.


    OP, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE.

    A lesser citizen might refrain from criticizing a soldier who served in Afghanistan BUT NOT YOU.

    You bravely type and post.

    WE SALUTE YOU.


    Since I served my country in Africa during the Clinton administration, I have Nieces and Nephews currently serving and my oldest son will be entering into service, I'll assume I'm not one of those "lesser" citizens you speak of.

    Your cleverness doesn't change the fact that sergeant Bergdahl is a deserter. He willing walked off his post and tried contacting "English speaking" members of the Taliban.
    Prior to that he had walked away from his post two other times. The truth is, even today the punishment for desertion in time of war is the firing squad.

    You can be as clever as you like, but it doesn't change the fact that we gave up five high level detainees, who will in all likelihood return to the battlefield against US soldiers, for a deserter. And for all the fools who think that we will be able to keep track of these guys and neutralize them with drones, how's that working out for former detainee Abu Bakr El Baghdadi ?

    Maybe you should actually salute the "brave" soldiers who, both past and present, put themselves in harms way so you can have the right to "bravely type and post" most cleverly.





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    Jun 23, 2014 5:19 PM GMT
    shybuffguy saidAnd for all the fools who think that we will be able to keep track of these guys and neutralize them with drones, how's that working out for former detainee Abu Bakr El Baghdadi ?


    I imagine he is somewhat anxious, given the number of senior al Qaeda and Taliban leaders who have been killed in US airstrikes:

    Killed in 2014:

    Haji Gul, Mufti Sofian, and Commander Abu Bakar.
    Haji Gul was a senior Haqqani Network commander. Mufti Sofian and Commander Abu Bakar were senior commanders in the Afghan Taliban.
    Date reported killed: June 11-12, 2013.


    Killed in 2013:

    Abdul Rehman, Mufti Hamidullah Haqqani, and Maulvi Ahmed Jan
    The three men served as senior Haqqani Network commanders. Maulvi Ahmed Jan is said to be an aide to Sirajuddin Haqqani. Date reported killed: Nov. 21, 2013.

    Hakeemullah Mehdsud
    The emir of the Movement of the Taiban in Pakistan.
    Date killed: Nov. 1, 2013.

    Mullah Sangeen Zadran
    The deputy to Haqqani Network operational commander Sirajuddin Haqqani. He also served as the Taliban's shadow governor in Paktika province, Afghanistan.
    Date killed: Sept. 5, 2013.

    Abu Rashid, Muhammed Ilyas Kuwaiti, and Muhammed Sajid Yamani
    Three mid-level al Qaeda military trainers.
    Date killed: July 28, 2013.

    Abu Saif al Jaziri and Maulana Akhtar Zadran
    Abu Saif al Jaziri was a senior al Qaeda military trainer. Maulana Akhtar Zadran was a Haqqani Network commander.
    Date killed: July 28, 2013.

    Waliur Rehman
    The deputy emir of the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan and the group's leader in South Waziristan.
    Date killed: May. 28, 2013.

    Abu Ubaydah Abdullah al Adam
    Abu Ubaydah Abdullah al Adam is al Qaeda's intelligence chief and a propagandist for Vanguards of the Khorasan.
    Date thought killed: Either April 14 or April 17, 2013.

    Sheikh Yasin Al Kuwaiti
    A key al Qaeda paramilitary commander in the Shadow Army who operated in Pakistan's tribal areas.
    Date killed: Jan. 8, 2013.

    Wali Mohammed
    A commander who is said to have directed suicide operations for the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan.
    Date killed: Jan. 6, 2013.

    Faisal Khan
    Khan was a mid-level commander in Hakeemullah Mehsud's Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan.
    Date killed: Jan. 3, 2013.

    Mullah Nazir, Atta Ullah, Rafey Khan, Rata Khan
    Mullah Nazir led the Taliban faction in the Wazir areas of South Waziristan. He identified himself as an al Qaeda leader and waged jihad in Afghanistan. Atta Ullah and Rafey Khan were Nazir's deputies; Rata Khan was a senior military commander.
    Date killed: Jan. 3, 2013.


    Killed in 2012:

    Mohammad Ahmed al Mansoor
    Mohammad Ahmed al Mansoor was a mid-level al Qaeda commander.
    Date killed: Dec. 9, 2012.

    Khalid bin Abdul Rahman al Husainan
    Husainan, who is also known as a Abu Zeid al Kuwaiti, served as a senior cleric and ideologue.
    Date thought killed: Dec. 7, 2012.

    Abdul Rehman al Zaman Yemeni
    Abdul Rehman al Zaman Yemeni was a mid-level al Qaeda commander.
    Date thought killed: Dec. 1, 2012.

    Sheikh Abdul Bari
    Sheikh Abdul Bari was a mid-level al Qaeda commander.
    Date thought killed: Nov. 29, 2012.

    Hassan Ghul
    Hassan Ghul served as Osama bin Laden's emissary to Abu Musab al Zarqawi before his capture in Iraq in 2004. He was held by the US, transfered to Pakistan, released in 2007, and returned al Qaeda to serve as a senior operative.
    Date killed: Oct. 1, 2012.

    Abu Kasha al Iraqi and Fateh al Turki
    Abu Kasha al Iraqi served as a top al Qaeda leader in the Mir Ali area in North Waziristan. Fateh al Turki was a senior al Qaeda military leader.
    Date thought killed: Sept. 25, 2012.

    Badruddin Haqqani
    A top deputy and brother of Sirajuddin Haqqani, the operational commander of the HAqqani Network.
    Date killed: He is believed to have been killed in one of 5 strikes in August 2012.

    Abdul Shakoor Turkistani
    The leader of the Turkistan Islamic Party and al Qaeda's operations chief in Pakistan's tribal areas.
    Date thought killed: Aug. 24, 2012.

    Abu Yahya al Libi
    Abu Yahya was a Libyan citizen, and served as al Qaeda's chief of staff and senior cleric and ideologue.
    Date killed: June 4, 2012.

    Abu Usman Adil
    Abu Usman Adil was the leader of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan and spearhead the expansion of the group's operations in Afghanistan.
    Date killed: April 29, 2012.

    Badr Mansoor
    Mansoor, a Pakistani citizen, served as al Qaeda's leader in Pakistan and a key link to the Taliban and Pakistani jihadist groups.
    Date killed: Feb. 9, 2012.

    Aslam Awan
    Awan, who is also known as Abdullah Khorasani, is a deputy to the leader of al Qaeda's external operations network and a Pakistani citizen.
    Date killed: Jan. 11, 2012.

    Qari Hussain Mehsud
    Qari Hussain was a top leader in the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan who also ran suicide training camps and planned suicide operations.
    The exact date of his death is unknown but he was rumored to have been killed in a US drone strike in January 2012.


    Killed in 2011:

    Hazrat Omar, Khan Mohammed, Miraj Wazir, and Ashfaq Wazir
    Omar was Mullah Nazir's brother who served as the group's operational commander in Afghanistan. Mohammed, a senior deputy to Nazir. Miraj Wazir and Ashfaq Wazir were senior commanders.
    Date killed: Oct. 27, 2011.

    Abu Miqdad al Masri
    A member of al Qaeda's Shura Majlis who also was involved in al Qaeda's external operations.
    Date killed: Oct. 13-14, 2011 (exact date is unclear)

    Abd al Rahman al Yemeni
    A senior operative who was involved in al Qaeda's external operations network.
    Date killed: Oct. 13-14, 2011 (exact date is unclear).

    Jan Baz Zadran
    Siraj Haqqani's deputy who served as the number three for the terror network.
    Date killed: Oct. 13, 2011.

    Haleem Ullah
    A deputy commander to North Waziristan Taliban leader Hafiz Gul Bahadar.
    Date killed: Sept. 30, 2011.

    Abu Hafs al Shahri
    A senior al Qaeda leader who served as the operations chief for Pakistan.
    Date killed: Sept. 11, 2011.

    Atiyah Abd al Rahman
    A senior al Qaeda leader who served as Osama bin Laden's chief of staff and a top operational commander.
    Date killed: Aug. 22, 2011.

    Ilyas Kashmiri
    The leader of al Qaeda's Lashkar al Zil and the operational commander of the Harkat ul Jihad-i-Islami. He also was a member of al Qaeda's external operatiosn council.
    Date killed: June 3, 2011.

    Abu Zaid al Iraqi
    A senior al Qaeda operative who served as the top financial officer in Pakistan.
    Date killed: Feb. 20, 2011.


    Killed in 2010:

    Ibn Amin
    A senior al Qaeda and Taliban military commander who led forces in Swat in Pakistan.
    Date reported killed: Dec. 17, 2010.

    Mohammed Usman
    Mohammed Usman was a key member of Ilyas Kashmiri's Brigade 313, al Qaeda's military formation in Pakistan, and also helped to unite al Qaeda with multiple Pakistani terror groups. He served as a key aide to Osama bin Laden.
    Date reported killed: One of several strikes in October 2010.

    Sheikh Fateh al Masri
    Al Qaeda's leader in Afghanistan and Pakistan (or the Khorasan).
    Date reported killed: Sept. 25, 2010.

    Saifullah Haqqani
    A Haqqani Network military commander in Afghanistan and a cousin of Siraj Haqqani. Date reported killed: Sept. 14, 2010.

    Qureshi
    An Islamic Jihad Group commander who trained Germans and other foreigners in North Waziristan and then sent them back to their home countries.
    Date reported killed: Sept. 8, 2010.

    Inayatullah
    A Taliban military commander based in North Waziristan.
    Date reported killed: Sept. 3, 2010.

    Hamza al Jawfi
    An Egyptian who led the al Qaeda-allied Pakistani terror group known as Jundallah.
    Date killed: June 29, 2010.

    Abu Ahmed
    An al Qaeda military commander who conducted operations in Afghanistan.
    Date killed: June 19, 2010.

    Sheikh Ihsanullah
    An al Qaeda military commander who conducted operations in Afghanistan.
    Date killed: June 10, 2010.
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    Jun 23, 2014 5:22 PM GMT
    Ibrahim
    The commander of the Fursan-i-Mohammed Group, an al Qaeda group based in North Waziristan.
    Date killed: June 10, 2010.

    Osama bin Ali bin Abdullah bin Damjan al Dawsari
    A senior operative and key link with the Taliban in South Waziristan, Pakistan. He also facilitated operations in Afghanistan.
    Date killed: May 28, 2010.

    Mustafa Abu Yazid
    Yazid, who is also known and Sheikh Saeed al Masri, is al Qaeda's leader in Afghanistan and top financial official.
    Date killed: May 21, 2010.

    Sadam Hussein Al Hussami
    A senior operative in al Qaeda's external operations network who was involved in the suicide attack that killed seven CIA officials in Khost. Hussami is also known as Ghazwan al Yemeni.
    Date killed: March 8, 2010.

    Qari Mohammad Zafar
    A leader of the al Qaeda and Taliban-linked Fedayeen-i-Islam wanted by the US for attacking the US Consulate in karachi in 2006
    Date killed: February 24, 2010.

    Mohammed Haqqani
    A mid-level Haqqani Network military commander and brother of the group's top military commander Siraj Haqqani.
    Date killed: February 18, 2010.

    Sheikh Mansoor
    An al Qaeda Shadow Army commander who was based in North Waziristan and operated in eastern Afghanistan.
    Date killed: February 17, 2010.

    Abdul Haq al Turkistani
    A member of al Qaeda's Shura Majlis and the leader of the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Party.
    Date killed: February 14, 2010.

    Abdul Basit Usmanusman.jpg
    The US has a $1 million bounty on Abdul Basit Usman, an Abu Sayyaf master bomb maker, for conducting attacks that murdered civilians. Usman's death is unconfirmed, however.
    Date thought killed: January 14, 2010.

    Jamal Saeed Abdul Rahimrahim-thumb.JPG An Abu Nidal Organization operative who participated in killing 22 hostages during the 1986 hijacking of Pan Am flight 73.
    Date reported killed: January 9, 2010.

    Mansur al ShamiMansur-al-Shami-thumb.JPG
    An al Qaeda ideologue and aide to Mustafa Abu Yazid.
    Date killed: Exact date is not known, he was last seen on As Sahab on January 4, 2010.


    Killed in 2009:

    Haji Omar Khan
    A senior Taliban leader in North Waziristan.
    Date killed: December 31, 2010

    Abdullah Said al Libi
    The top commander of the Lashkar al Zil, al Qaeda's Shadow Army.
    Date thought killed: December 17, 2009 (exact date is not known)

    Zuhaib al Zahib
    A commander in the Lashkar al Zil, al Qaeda's Shadow Army.
    Date killed: December 17, 2009

    Saleh al Somali
    The leader of al Qaeda's external network.
    Date killed: December 8, 2009

    Abu Musa al Masri
    A senior al Qaeda explosive expert and trainer.
    Date killed: October 21, 2009

    Najmuddin Jalolov
    The leader of the Islamic Jihad Group, a breakaway faction of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan. He was closely allied with al Qaeda.
    Date killed: September 14, 2009

    Maulvi Ismail Khan
    A military commander in the Haqqani Network.
    Date killed: September 8, 2009

    Mustafa al Jaziri
    A senior military commander for al Qaeda who sits on al Qaeda's military shura.
    Date killed: September 7, 2009

    Tahir Yuldashev tahir_yuldashev_3.jpg
    The leader of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan.
    Date killed: August 27, 2009

    Baitullah MehsudBaitullah.jpg
    The overall leader of the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan.
    Date killed: August 5, 2009

    Kifayatullah Anikhel
    A Taliban commander under Baitullah Mehsud.
    Date killed: July 7, 2009

    Mufti Noor Wali
    A suicide bomber trainer for the Taliban and al Qaeda.
    Date killed: July 3, 2009

    Khwaz Ali Mehsud
    A senior deputy to Baitullah Mehsud.
    Date killed: June 23, 2009

    Abdullah Hamas al Filistini
    A senior al Qaeda trainer.
    Date killed: April 1, 2009

    Osama al Kini (aka Fahid Mohammed Ally Msalam)
    Al Qaeda's operations chief for Pakistan who was wanted for the 1998 bombings against the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.
    Date killed: January 1, 2009

    Sheikh Ahmed Salim Swedanswedan2.jpg
    A senior aide to Osama al Kini who was wanted for the 1998 bombings against the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.
    Date killed: January 1, 2009

    Sa'ad bin Laden
    One of Osama bin Laden's sons who served as a senior al Qaeda leader in Iran and was involved in several plots. He was considered to be a possible successor of Osama. The exact date of his death is not known.
    Killed in 2009

    Rashid Rauf
    A senior al Qaeda leader who directed plots in the United Kingdom from Pakistan. Date killed: The exact date is unknown, he was reported killed in 2008 but was later implicated in a plot in Europe in 2009.

    Killed in 2008:

    Abu Zubair al Masri
    Served as an explosives expert for al Qaeda as well as a leader.
    Date killed: November 21, 2008

    Abdullah Azzam al Saudi
    Served as liaison between al Qaeda and the Taliban operating in Pakistan's northwest. Azzam facilitated al Qaeda's external operations network. He also served as a recruiter and trainer for al Qaeda.
    Date killed: November 19, 2008

    Abu Jihad al Masri
    The leader of the Egyptian Islamic Group and the chief of al Qaeda's intelligence branch, and directed al Qaeda's intelligence shura. He directed al Qaeda's external operations in Egypt.
    Date killed: October 31, 2008

    Khalid Habib
    The commander of the Lashkar al Zil or the Shadow Army, al Qaeda's paramilitary forces in Pakistan's northwest and Afghanistan.
    Date killed: October 16, 2008

    Abu al Hasan al Rimi
    A senior al Qaeda operative.
    Date killed: October 2008 - exact date unknown

    Abu Ubaidah al Tunisi
    An al Qaeda military commander who fought against the Russians in Afghanistan.
    Date killed: September 17, 2008

    Abu Musa
    An al Qaeda operative from Saudi Arabia.
    Date killed: September 8, 2008

    Abu Qasim
    An al Qaeda operative from Egypt.
    Date killed: September 8, 2008

    Abu Hamza
    An explosives expert from Saudi Arabia who served as al Qaeda's commander in Peshawar.
    Date killed: September 8, 2008

    Abu Haris
    A senior al Qaeda military commander from Syria who led more than 250 Arab and Afghan fighters under the guise of the Jaish al Mahdi in Helmand province. He became al Qaeda's operations chief in the tribal areas in 2008.
    Date killed: September 8, 2008

    Abu Wafa al Saudi
    An al Qaeda commander and logistician.
    Date killed: September 4, 2008

    Abdul Rehman
    A local Taliban commander in the Wana region in South Waziristan.
    Date killed: August 13, 2008

    Abu Khabab al Masri
    The chief of al Qaeda's weapons of mass destruction program and a master bomb maker.
    Date killed: July 28, 2008

    Abu Mohammad Ibrahim bin Abi al Faraj al Masri
    A religious leader, close to Abu Khabab al Masri.
    Date killed: July 28, 2008

    Abdul Wahhab al Masri
    A senior aide to Abu Khabab al Masri.
    Date killed: July 28, 2008

    Abu Islam al Masri
    Aide to Abu Khabab al Masri.
    Date killed: July 28, 2008

    Abu Sulayman Jazairi
    The chief of al Qaeda's external network. Jazairi was a senior trainer, an explosives expert, and an operational commander tasked with planning attacks on the West.
    Date killed: May 14, 2008

    Dr. Arshad Waheed (aka Sheikh Moaz)
    A mid-level al Qaeda leader.
    Date killed: March 16, 2008

    Abu Laith al Libi
    Senior military commander in Afghanistan and the leader of the reformed Brigade 055 in al Qaeda's paramilitary Shadow Army.
    Date killed: January 29, 2008

    Killed in 2007:

    No senior al Qaeda or Taliban leaders or operatives were reported killed during the strikes in 2007.

    Killed in 2006:

    Liaquat Hussain
    Second-in-command of the Bajaur TNSM.
    Date killed: October 30, 2006

    Imam Asad
    Camp commander for the Black Guard, al Qaeda's elite bodyguard for Osama bin Laden and Ayman al Zawahiri. Asad was a Chechen with close links to Shamil Basayev.
    Date killed: March 1, 2006

    Killed in 2005:

    Abu Hamza Rabia
    Al Qaeda's operational commander. He was involved with two assassination plots against Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.
    Date killed: December 1, 2005
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    Jun 23, 2014 5:24 PM GMT
    Haitham al Yemeni
    A senior al Qaeda's explosives expert who also is thought to have been close to Osama bin Laden and Abu Faraj al Libi.
    Date killed: May 15, 2005

    Killed in 2004:

    Nek Mohammednek-mohammed
    A senior Taliban commander in South Waziristan who had links to Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar.
    Date killed: June 18, 2004


    And that little lot is just those killed in Pakistan.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jul 29, 2014 6:01 AM GMT
    MikeW saidSo you really honestly believe a president of the United States (regardless of his political affiliation) makes decisions concerning US interests a) in a vacuum and b) with no more intelligence (that is, critical information from intelligence sources within the military and beyond) than one can find watching FOX news? Whatever FOX or any other news source has told you, neither you nor I nor anyone else in the public has any idea what discussions took place at various levels of government to arrive at this agreement. Anyone who thinks presidents make uninformed unilateral decisions regarding such matters is truly ignorant. You may not agree with the decision, everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but that is all it is: An opinion based on limited information.


    A president with foreign policy experience and a spine would have flexed his power to stop this trade. That he could have done! Do you really think he's doing a good job in regards to foreign policy and relations? Do you think other countries respect the United States more now that he is president. He is a joke he can even effectively guard our own boarders! As a world super power the United States must be respected. He is weakening our great country within and abroad!
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    Jul 29, 2014 3:04 PM GMT
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Jul 29, 2014 5:20 PM GMT
    I always thought that a person had to be tried before he could be called a traitor.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Aug 21, 2014 6:50 AM GMT
    It's ok the obama's are on another 17 million dollar vacation on your tax dollar. Fools!