Anyone do stronglift? I have questions!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 17, 2014 12:47 AM GMT
    Barbell squat:

    regarding how low I should go with my legs, am I supposed to go low enough that my butt feels it? Nowadays I go kind of low and barely works my butt, idk.

    Barbell bench press:


    so I have been watching scott herman videos, and corrected most of my form today. I was doing with my chest up, lat squeezed, and on my nipple line.

    is this workout supposed to work the inner chest? i thouhgt I fell my inner chest being worked today. I don't know.

    barbell row:

    so Stronglift wants me to do the barbell row from the ground, but I find it much hard. Would it be okay if I do this barbell row instead?

    barbell overhead press:

    is my lower back supposed straight and not move, even a bit, when I move the bar up and down my head between rep?

    THANKS FOR ALL THE ANSWERS. Stay tune though cause I might ask more after i see ur replies.
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    Jun 17, 2014 12:48 AM GMT
    this effing forum. I Was in the GENERAL fitness board when I click create thread.

    Why did you default back to All Things Gay?
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    Jun 17, 2014 12:56 AM GMT
    leafgreen saidam I supposed to go low enough that my butt feels it?


    icon_lol.gif

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    Jun 17, 2014 1:04 AM GMT
    JackBoneTX said
    leafgreen saidam I supposed to go low enough that my butt feels it?


    icon_lol.gif


    im being serious....
  • disasterpiece

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    Jun 17, 2014 2:42 AM GMT
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    Jun 17, 2014 5:07 AM GMT
    silver_bullet saidIf your glutes/butt does not feel worked by the squat, you are not going to parallel OR your knees are shifting forward too much on the way down so you are using your thighs and your butt/hams are not engaged much in the movement. This can give you knee problems/higher risk of injury and also you will not get the results because all your power to drive the weight up is centered in the hips/butt area.

    You need a few sessions with a trainer who has got a clue ( get some guy who actually does strength training and squats, deadlifts a decent weight ) to show you how to do the big compound movements properly - especially if you are going to do strength programs.

    Stretching is real important. Most guys are too inflexible around the hip/groin/lower back/thighs because they are sitting down at work or driving or sitting on the sofa all the time. The squat is a wide ranging movement, most people cannot even do a proper squat with zero weight because they are too inflexible.

    Plenty of youtube stuff for hip mobility etc.


    i have been doing this for a while using videos and stuff, and so far I think I corrected most problems (like limp wrist when working out is bad).

    do i squat exactly shoulder length? I think I did it a little bit wider than shoulder length. and I just realize I might have had my toes angled too much. I'll try them forward next time icon_razz.gif

    And I will deload some weights and try going lower than I usually do.... To work my butts instead of jsut legs.

    omg I forget to stretch in ages...i usually do static body stretches when i have time and remember. like those ones from PE. (touching toes and others i cant remember names)
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    Jun 30, 2014 11:16 PM GMT
    posting in my own thread.

    Pendelay row. how far exactly should my arm width be?

    Also, those lines on a typical barbell, do they have names?
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    Jul 01, 2014 3:02 PM GMT
    leafgreen saidposting in my own thread.

    Pendelay row. how far exactly should my arm width be?

    Also, those lines on a typical barbell, do they have names?


    Most people refer to those lines as the "knurling", but that's not actually correct. The tiny diamond shaped gripping surface is actually the knurling. I just call those line the finger marks. Where your fingers are in relation to those marks will obviously vary depending upon what exercise you're performing. It will also vary depending on your size and degree of flexibility. I personally like to go very wide with my finger placement on squats (which is nowhere near the marks.)

    A little off subject: If your shoulders feel tight during squatting, it's important to rerack the weight and find a more comfortable position for your hands along the bar. Stressing the shoulders too much during a squat can cause an injury and trust me....your shoulders are not an area you want to damage! If you can't find a pain free position, you'll need to gently stretch your shoulders before proceeding. If that's a problem, I can give you several stretching exercises to help.
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    Jul 01, 2014 3:22 PM GMT
    Barbell Rows from the Floor - I personally believe this to be the most dangerous exercises a person can do. There are few movements that put your lower back at risk for injury as much as this exercise. Don't get me wrong....I think it's a great exercise, but my personal belief is the risk is greater than the reward. If you insist on doing them, go LIGHT. You load that bar up too heavy and you can tear a disc very easily! And once that happens, it will be with you the rest of your life. Also, have a friend watch you for correct form. Your back should stay flat. The minute you round your back, you're setting yourself up for injury. I would also prefer to see you do a one arm dumbbell row as opposed to the barbell row. MUCH less stress on your lower back because you're bracing yourself against the bench with your free hand.

    And one more thing....if you're already doing squats and deadlifts on a regular basis, adding this barbell row from the floor is just asking for trouble. Your lower back will already be fatigued and in a weakened state for such high stress on the lower back. Again, if you insist on doing this exercise, put as much distance between squats and deadlifts as possible. And if you must do them on the same day, do the rows first, so your back is not worn out.
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    Jul 01, 2014 3:30 PM GMT
    Barbell Overhead Press - When you ask if your lower back is supposed to "move", well yes it's going to move a bit, but if you mean should you be bending at the lower back, then no. Be sure to allow your head to track forward through the movement as you get the bar past your head. A lot of people keep their head back through the entire press as if they're trying to look at the bar above their heads, which is incorrect. Another common mistake in this exercise is people often perform it with their legs spread too far out. Seems logical to think that would give you greater stability but that's not the case. You want the weight be be supported by your legs and feet, which means you want a narrower stance.
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    Jul 01, 2014 7:53 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidBarbell Rows from the Floor - I personally believe this to be the most dangerous exercises a person can do. There are few movements that put your lower back at risk for injury as much as this exercise. Don't get me wrong....I think it's a great exercise, but my personal belief is the risk is greater than the reward. If you insist on doing them, go LIGHT. You load that bar up too heavy and you can tear a disc very easily! And once that happens, it will be with you the rest of your life. Also, have a friend watch you for correct form. Your back should stay flat. The minute you round your back, you're setting yourself up for injury. I would also prefer to see you do a one arm dumbbell row as opposed to the barbell row. MUCH less stress on your lower back because you're bracing yourself against the bench with your free hand.

    And one more thing....if you're already doing squats and deadlifts on a regular basis, adding this barbell row from the floor is just asking for trouble. Your lower back will already be fatigued and in a weakened state for such high stress on the lower back. Again, if you insist on doing this exercise, put as much distance between squats and deadlifts as possible. And if you must do them on the same day, do the rows first, so your back is not worn out.


    Typically I am supposed to start with squat. @_@ I start with barbell squat on mon. wed, fri, and rest tu/th/sat/sunday. I onyl do one set of deadlifts when i do them every other day of my exercise days...

    I have dropped half of my weights to do pendelay rows and practice with forms. Though IDk what I would do when it gets heavy. Maybe I'll just use the standing barbell row for a while. That, or maybe I could do the standing barbell row permanently, idk. (suggestion and explanation please?)

    (so wait, there are people who disagree with stronglifts? haha)

    Scruffypup saidBarbell Overhead Press - When you ask if your lower back is supposed to "move", well yes it's going to move a bit, but if you mean should you be bending at the lower back, then no. Be sure to allow your head to track forward through the movement as you get the bar past your head. A lot of people keep their head back through the entire press as if they're trying to look at the bar above their heads, which is incorrect. Another common mistake in this exercise is people often perform it with their legs spread too far out. Seems logical to think that would give you greater stability but that's not the case. You want the weight be be supported by your legs and feet, which means you want a narrower stance.


    I meant like if my lower back should be moving a bit when I am pulling the bar up and down my head. And I move my head as the bar goes up, so it should be fine. ^_^ I'll keep a note of the legs. I usually keep them shoulder width

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    Jul 01, 2014 7:55 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    leafgreen saidposting in my own thread.

    Pendelay row. how far exactly should my arm width be?

    Also, those lines on a typical barbell, do they have names?


    Most people refer to those lines as the "knurling", but that's not actually correct. The tiny diamond shaped gripping surface is actually the knurling. I just call those line the finger marks. Where your fingers are in relation to those marks will obviously vary depending upon what exercise you're performing. It will also vary depending on your size and degree of flexibility. I personally like to go very wide with my finger placement on squats (which is nowhere near the marks.)

    A little off subject: If your shoulders feel tight during squatting, it's important to rerack the weight and find a more comfortable position for your hands along the bar. Stressing the shoulders too much during a squat can cause an injury and trust me....your shoulders are not an area you want to damage! If you can't find a pain free position, you'll need to gently stretch your shoulders before proceeding. If that's a problem, I can give you several stretching exercises to help.


    I usually stretch after workout, but I sometimes forget to do it too. :/
    So shoulders should be more relaxed for squat then? Like I should tense it jsut enough to hold the bar on my back?
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    Jul 01, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    leafgreen said
    Scruffypup saidBarbell Rows from the Floor - I personally believe this to be the most dangerous exercises a person can do. There are few movements that put your lower back at risk for injury as much as this exercise. Don't get me wrong....I think it's a great exercise, but my personal belief is the risk is greater than the reward. If you insist on doing them, go LIGHT. You load that bar up too heavy and you can tear a disc very easily! And once that happens, it will be with you the rest of your life. Also, have a friend watch you for correct form. Your back should stay flat. The minute you round your back, you're setting yourself up for injury. I would also prefer to see you do a one arm dumbbell row as opposed to the barbell row. MUCH less stress on your lower back because you're bracing yourself against the bench with your free hand.

    And one more thing....if you're already doing squats and deadlifts on a regular basis, adding this barbell row from the floor is just asking for trouble. Your lower back will already be fatigued and in a weakened state for such high stress on the lower back. Again, if you insist on doing this exercise, put as much distance between squats and deadlifts as possible. And if you must do them on the same day, do the rows first, so your back is not worn out.


    Typically I am supposed to start with squat. @_@ I start with barbell squat on mon. wed, fri, and rest tu/th/sat/sunday. I onyl do one set of deadlifts when i do them every other day of my exercise days...

    I have dropped half of my weights to do pendelay rows and practice with forms. Though IDk what I would do when it gets heavy. Maybe I'll just use the standing barbell row for a while. That, or maybe I could do the standing barbell row permanently, idk. (suggestion and explanation please?)

    (so wait, there are people who disagree with stronglifts? haha)



    I never said I was against "strong lifts." But remember....you're 5'6/115lbs. You're a tiny guy. And you've not said if you have any old or current injuries or healthy problems. All that needs to be taken into consideration. I'm saying you should be very careful with that particular movement because it puts your back in a very awkward position. A position that I personally avoid. There are better (safer) ways of strengthening your back in my opinion. Again, that's just my opinion.
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    Jul 01, 2014 8:49 PM GMT
    leafgreen said
    Scruffypup said
    leafgreen saidposting in my own thread.

    Pendelay row. how far exactly should my arm width be?

    Also, those lines on a typical barbell, do they have names?


    Most people refer to those lines as the "knurling", but that's not actually correct. The tiny diamond shaped gripping surface is actually the knurling. I just call those line the finger marks. Where your fingers are in relation to those marks will obviously vary depending upon what exercise you're performing. It will also vary depending on your size and degree of flexibility. I personally like to go very wide with my finger placement on squats (which is nowhere near the marks.)

    A little off subject: If your shoulders feel tight during squatting, it's important to rerack the weight and find a more comfortable position for your hands along the bar. Stressing the shoulders too much during a squat can cause an injury and trust me....your shoulders are not an area you want to damage! If you can't find a pain free position, you'll need to gently stretch your shoulders before proceeding. If that's a problem, I can give you several stretching exercises to help.


    I usually stretch after workout, but I sometimes forget to do it too. :/
    So shoulders should be more relaxed for squat then? Like I should tense it jsut enough to hold the bar on my back?


    You should not be struggling to hold the bar on your back. Your hands should be on the bar basically just to keep it balanced safely there. It's a leg and back exercise....not a shoulder workout. And yes, if your shoulders are tight and give you discomfort when squatting, by all means stretch them out before squatting. That way you'll be able to concentrate on your form instead of thinking about your aching shoulders.
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    Jul 01, 2014 8:58 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    leafgreen said
    Scruffypup said
    leafgreen saidposting in my own thread.

    Pendelay row. how far exactly should my arm width be?

    Also, those lines on a typical barbell, do they have names?


    Most people refer to those lines as the "knurling", but that's not actually correct. The tiny diamond shaped gripping surface is actually the knurling. I just call those line the finger marks. Where your fingers are in relation to those marks will obviously vary depending upon what exercise you're performing. It will also vary depending on your size and degree of flexibility. I personally like to go very wide with my finger placement on squats (which is nowhere near the marks.)

    A little off subject: If your shoulders feel tight during squatting, it's important to rerack the weight and find a more comfortable position for your hands along the bar. Stressing the shoulders too much during a squat can cause an injury and trust me....your shoulders are not an area you want to damage! If you can't find a pain free position, you'll need to gently stretch your shoulders before proceeding. If that's a problem, I can give you several stretching exercises to help.


    I usually stretch after workout, but I sometimes forget to do it too. :/
    So shoulders should be more relaxed for squat then? Like I should tense it jsut enough to hold the bar on my back?


    You should not be struggling to hold the bar on your back. Your hands should be on the bar basically just to keep it balanced safely there. It's a leg and back exercise....not a shoulder workout. And yes, if your shoulders are tight and give you discomfort when squatting, by all means stretch them out before squatting. That way you'll be able to concentrate on your form instead of thinking about your aching shoulders.


    right now i just wish I can take a picture of my gym's barbell and describe how far I put my hands haha. I thought about recording myself doing the weights but I think they have a policy on that. (but people record on phone anyways, i think it might be a policy for unauthorized or unconsented videotaping)

    well, when i do squats i don't tense or flex my shoulders hard, so i think i am okay...
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    Jul 01, 2014 9:02 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    leafgreen said
    Scruffypup saidBarbell Rows from the Floor - I personally believe this to be the most dangerous exercises a person can do. There are few movements that put your lower back at risk for injury as much as this exercise. Don't get me wrong....I think it's a great exercise, but my personal belief is the risk is greater than the reward. If you insist on doing them, go LIGHT. You load that bar up too heavy and you can tear a disc very easily! And once that happens, it will be with you the rest of your life. Also, have a friend watch you for correct form. Your back should stay flat. The minute you round your back, you're setting yourself up for injury. I would also prefer to see you do a one arm dumbbell row as opposed to the barbell row. MUCH less stress on your lower back because you're bracing yourself against the bench with your free hand.

    And one more thing....if you're already doing squats and deadlifts on a regular basis, adding this barbell row from the floor is just asking for trouble. Your lower back will already be fatigued and in a weakened state for such high stress on the lower back. Again, if you insist on doing this exercise, put as much distance between squats and deadlifts as possible. And if you must do them on the same day, do the rows first, so your back is not worn out.


    Typically I am supposed to start with squat. @_@ I start with barbell squat on mon. wed, fri, and rest tu/th/sat/sunday. I onyl do one set of deadlifts when i do them every other day of my exercise days...

    I have dropped half of my weights to do pendelay rows and practice with forms. Though IDk what I would do when it gets heavy. Maybe I'll just use the standing barbell row for a while. That, or maybe I could do the standing barbell row permanently, idk. (suggestion and explanation please?)

    (so wait, there are people who disagree with stronglifts? haha)



    I never said I was against "strong lifts." But remember....you're 5'6/115lbs. You're a tiny guy. And you've not said if you have any old or current injuries or healthy problems. All that needs to be taken into consideration. I'm saying you should be very careful with that particular movement because it puts your back in a very awkward position. A position that I personally avoid. There are better (safer) ways of strengthening your back in my opinion. Again, that's just my opinion.


    omg, im tiny? HAHAHAAHA. I thought Im average ._.

    and i dont have any previous injuries to my bones or muscles or joints.

    I'll just get someone to check on my form next time I do it I guess.
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    Jul 01, 2014 9:19 PM GMT
    Sorry, that was not meant to be an insult.
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    Jul 01, 2014 9:22 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidSorry, that was not meant to be an insult.


    nah it's fine. i dont take comments on my body size as insults.

    but yeah, i'll get a form checker person hopefully.