Art deco - all the dirty little secrets that you always wanted to know

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    Jun 18, 2014 4:44 AM GMT
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:07 AM GMT
    now that was a bait and switch
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:10 AM GMT
    This is a bait and switch.

    worm.jpg
    switch-on.jpg
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:15 AM GMT
    Did this dumb post really get 982 views in only a few minutes?
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:16 AM GMT
    kevex saidDid this dumb post really get 982 in only a few minutes?


    I was just gonna say that! OP has great marketing skills. icon_lol.gif
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jun 18, 2014 5:36 AM GMT
    polfsky saidOP has great marketing skills. icon_lol.gif
    That, or peeps are so desperate for drama they'll jump at anything even remotely hinting at scandal.
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:57 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThis is a bait and switch.

    worm.jpg
    switch-on.jpg


    How about 'bate and switch? icon_redface.gificon_redface.gif
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    Jun 18, 2014 6:16 AM GMT
    lol I expected sharkadelic :c


    wheres the battle axe for a razor :C
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    Jun 18, 2014 1:06 PM GMT
    polfsky said
    kevex saidDid this dumb post really get 982 in only a few minutes?


    I was just gonna say that! OP has great marketing skills. icon_lol.gif


    I wish that I could be so lucky with my business related posts on my CRE blog.
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    Jun 18, 2014 9:16 PM GMT
    Art Deco owes us some confessions now
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    Jun 18, 2014 9:36 PM GMT
    Ohno saidArt Deco owes us some confessions now

    Well, perhaps some comments. An interesting complilation.

    I was glad to see Erté represented:

    “Art Deco, of course, is the confluence of Cubism and Art Nouveau.”—Erté

    Though I always felt, and I know I'll be in the minority here, that Erté leaned more to the earlier Art Nouveau. Some of my gay friends have owned original Erté. As well as Tamara de Lempicka, also featured in that link.

    But the thing omitted here, unless I missed it, is that Art Deco, at least in its American incarnation, incorporates the concept of streamlining. Industrial art in the Machine Age, the Transportation Age. Cars, trains, and automobiles meant to efficiently slice through the wind.

    A motif that carried over into mundane objects that were never going to face the wind, like kitchen toasters and vacuum cleaners, interior design, furniture, and the design of personal objects like writing pens, jewelry, accessories and clothing.

    Art Deco may have been the most comprehensive design movement that ever existed. It was everywhere, from architecture to the fonts used in printing, EVERYTHING could be interpreted in Art Deco. You can't say that about any other style.

    BTW, here's a Tamara de Lempicka I always found erotic, but not included in that piece - "Adam et Eve":

    201012050752417018_M.jpg

    This is a doctor? So it is titled:

    3.jpg
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    Jun 18, 2014 9:43 PM GMT
    The ARIZONA Biltmore a famous historic resort here in the heart of Phoenix, Arizona is a Frank Loyd Wright Masterpiece and was originally built for Mr. Wrigley of the Wrigley Chewing gum company who also built the Wrigley Stadium in Chicago.

    He originally built the Biltmore for his guests to stay when visiting the sunny state. He lived up the hill at the still standing Wrigley Mansion. http://instagram.com/wrigleymansion

    The resort held lavish parties in the late 20's and early 30's and still has some amazing Art Deco accents and furnishings. It has been rumored that many BIG orgies were held there and even today, it's a perfect spot for a high class fuck!!

    Cheers.


    http://waldorfastoria3.hilton.com/en/hotels/arizona/arizona-biltmore-a-waldorf-astoria-resort-PHXBMWA/index.html?wt.srch=1

    http://www.wrigleymansion.com/
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    Jun 18, 2014 10:48 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Ohno saidArt Deco owes us some confessions now

    Well, perhaps some comments. An interesting complilation.

    I was glad to see Erté represented:

    “Art Deco, of course, is the confluence of Cubism and Art Nouveau.”—Erté

    Though I always felt, and I know I'll be in the minority here, that Erté leaned more to the earlier Art Nouveau. Some of my gay friends have owned original Erté. As well as Tamara de Lempicka, also featured in that link.

    But the thing omitted here, unless I missed it, is that Art Deco, at least in its American incarnation, incorporates the concept of streamlining. Industrial art in the Machine Age, the Transportation Age. Cars, trains, and automobiles meant to efficiently slice through the wind.

    A motif that carried over into mundane objects that were never going to face the wind, like kitchen toasters and vacuum cleaners, interior design, furniture, and the design of personal objects like writing pens, jewelry, accessories and clothing.

    Art Deco may have been the most comprehensive design movement that ever existed. It was everywhere, from architecture to the fonts used in printing, EVERYTHING could be interpreted in Art Deco. You can't say that about any other style.

    BTW, here's a Tamara de Lempicka I always found erotic, but not included in that piece - "Adam et Eve":

    201012050752417018_M.jpg

    This is a doctor? So it is titled:

    3.jpg


    Which brings to mind

    https://www.google.com/search?q=chrysler+airflow&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=FReiU96KJsm0yASH0YHIBg&sqi=2&ved=0CCwQsAQ&biw=1675&bih=944
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    Jun 18, 2014 10:52 PM GMT
    and of course a few that are not as well known that did even a better job of it. One that comes to mind is:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=delahaye&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=IxiiU8OZGpSmyAS2l4KQAg&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1675&bih=944
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    Jun 18, 2014 11:09 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree saidand of course a few that are not as well known that did even a better job of it. One that comes to mind is:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=delahaye&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=IxiiU8OZGpSmyAS2l4KQAg&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1675&bih=944

    Few Americans could afford to import a Delahaye in the middle of the Great Depression, along with Bugattis and other examples of custom Art Deco coachwork. And the homegrown Chrysler Airflows were too radical for US drivers, almost wrecked the company. Nobody needed a low coefficient of drag when most cars weren't taken over 50 mph on local roads, high-speed Intestates were decades away, and gasoline cost pennies a gallon.
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    Jun 19, 2014 12:50 AM GMT
    Here's my favorite Art Deco palace of all time: Radio City Music Hall, in Rockefeller Center, New York City. I saw my first movie here in 1954. Art Deco was still plentiful all around Manhattan, before the glass-walled skyscraper boxes of corporate America began to dominate.

    The Great Stage pictured here. Over 80 years old now, and still one of the most technically advanced ever built, and among the largest on Earth. You can't believe the tricks this stage can still do. The Tony Awards were recently held here. The pinnacle of Art Deco.

    th?id=HN.608028869492934185&pid=15.1

    radio-city.jpg

    radio-city-music-hall-seating.jpg

    main-lobby-radio-city-music-hall-dave-mi

    2393688578_5a6cc4d486_z.jpg
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    Jun 19, 2014 1:12 AM GMT
    I couldn't find any pictures online of the lower level lounge areas of Radio City. Odd as it may sound, they are also impressive. Huge suites, especially for the women. With sumptuous black marble, gorgeous original murals, rich custom-made Art Deco carpets and furniture, restroom attendants everywhere.

    One of the original executive office suites, restored to its 1930s appearance (other than a flat screen for media presentations):

    Radio_City_Music_Hall_3713738085_a2ca18c
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    Jun 19, 2014 2:28 AM GMT
    Decadence_of_Art saidMaybe he could tell us about his time as Governor.icon_wink.gificon_lol.gif

    Maybe you could tell us again about your time as the only Bonafide Homosexual in this part of the known Galaxy.
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    Jun 19, 2014 4:54 AM GMT
    Ohno saidArt Deco owes us some confessions now


    Maybe he could tell us about all the decadence of being Governor:icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 19, 2014 3:00 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    freedomisntfree saidand of course a few that are not as well known that did even a better job of it. One that comes to mind is:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=delahaye&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=IxiiU8OZGpSmyAS2l4KQAg&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1675&bih=944

    Few Americans could afford to import a Delahaye in the middle of the Great Depression, along with Bugattis and other examples of custom Art Deco coachwork. And the homegrown Chrysler Airflows were too radical for US drivers, almost wrecked the company. Who needed a low coefficient of drag when most cars weren't taken over 50 mph on local roads, high-speed Intestates were decades away, and gasoline cost pennies a gallon?


    Although there were many more makes that did similar, the Delehaye most epitomized art deco design IMO. Nothing that I know of did it quite as well.
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    Jun 19, 2014 3:38 PM GMT
    An original sketch of the "Topper" car from the 1937 Hollywood comedy film with Cary Grant.

    topper.jpg

    Here's how the car actually looked in the movie:

    Topper2_zps07f89355.jpg

    i019840.jpg

    Much modern speculation as to what the car actually is. Answer: it's a 1936 Buick Roadmaster, with custom coachwork just for the movie, one of a kind.
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    Jun 19, 2014 3:59 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidHere's my favorite Art Deco palace of all time: Radio City Music Hall, in Rockefeller Center, New York City. I saw my first movie here in 1954. Art Deco was still plentiful all around Manhattan, before the glass-walled skyscraper boxes of corporate America began to dominate.



    I've never been in there, but it's gorgeous.

    "Art Deco was still plentiful all around Manhattan, before the glass-walled skyscraper boxes of corporate America began to dominate."

    And one of the things great about detroit is much of it still stands, although barely. I hope that somehow, someway the resources are found to restore most of it. Sadly, some of it is too far gone.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Jun 20, 2014 12:16 AM GMT
    you could just look in any direction in any room at my house...


    1016937_10152325196560115_39313378431242

    1743625_10152186404125115_1874048708_n.j
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    Jun 20, 2014 1:23 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    And one of the things great about Detroit is much of it still stands, although barely. I hope that somehow, someway the resources are found to restore most of it. Sadly, some of it is too far gone.

    The first time I came down to what is now South Beach in 1973, on Miami Beach (back then SoBe was known as Old Miami Beach, not a very inviting or marketable name), I saw these great old Art Deco hotels. But most in terrible shape, some abandoned, some being demolished as I watched. It broke my heart.

    A few years later my sister, a resident here since 1971, told me a movement had started to save the Art Deco buildings, especially the hotels. Not surprisingly, many of the organizers were gays & artists. She gave me some names.

    First they got part of Old Miami Beach designated the Art Deco District, which it remains. Later the area became known as South Beach, as the revitalization efforts began to show results, and the term Old Miami Beach was largely discarded in keeping with the fresh look.

    I donated what money I could to the efforts. Not a great deal, an Army Officer doesn't earn much, and I could only visit South Florida on leave during my military career. But I came here as often as I could, usually by motorcycle my first 20 years.

    So that there are 2 Art Deco meccas that I know & love: New York City, where I grew up; and Miami Beach, near where I've settled in retirement.
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    Jun 20, 2014 6:03 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    freedomisntfree said
    And one of the things great about Detroit is much of it still stands, although barely. I hope that somehow, someway the resources are found to restore most of it. Sadly, some of it is too far gone.

    The first time I came down to what is now South Beach in 1973, on Miami Beach (back then SoBe was known as Old Miami Beach, not a very inviting or marketable name), I saw these great old Art Deco hotels. But most in terrible shape, some abandoned, some being demolished as I watched. It broke my heart.

    A few years later my sister, a resident here since 1971, told me a movement had started to save the Art Deco buildings, especially the hotels. Not surprisingly, many of the organizers were gays & artists. She gave me some names.

    First they got part of Old Miami Beach designated the Art Deco District, which it remains. Later the area became known as South Beach, as the revitalization efforts began to show results, and the term Old Miami Beach was largely discarded in keeping with the fresh look.

    I donated what money I could to the efforts. Not a great deal, an Army Officer doesn't earn much, and I could only visit South Florida on leave during my military career. But I came here as often as I could, usually by motorcycle my first 20 years.

    So that there are 2 Art Deco meccas that I know & love: New York City, where I grew up; and Miami Beach, near where I've settled in retirement.


    Let's hope we can add a third .... Detroit

    (I know I'm sort of a champion of the underdog, but boy did I pick a dog of an underdog with Detroit).