The Price Of Grocery

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:32 AM GMT
    OMG, icon_eek.gif

    I haven't done major grocery shopping in a couple months, so I was due to fill the pantry, OMG, where I usually go, Albertsons, is way too expensive on many of their items now, even the staples I always get, some marked down by the store, are no longer marked down!

    I cant afford $6 for a tub of low fat cottage cheese, and that is the store brand!

    They finally got grapes and plums in, and at a discount so I got a bunch of those

    A box of 1 min Cream Of Wheat is $6.50!

    If you want all beef hot dogs for the grill, not one package or brand (of 4, or icon_cool.gif is under $5.00!, not even 2/$5 anymore!

    I like med sized egg noodles, making soup, I have watched a reg priced bag go from $.99, $1.50, $1.99, $2.50, now stands at $2.80, "discount" price is 2/$4, no longer can I get the same sized bag for under $2.00


    I started going to Vons to find cheaper things, but not by much, actually, CVS small grocery items on its shelves are sometimes cheaper than both major chains! 2% Milk I get at CVS, at grocery, they want $6 a gallon for 2%, and that is store brand milk!

    I cant imagine food prices going much higher than they already are, no wonder so many people are on food stamps!, its horrible these stores are gouging prices and the consumer icon_twisted.gif


    Behind the cornucopia of higher food prices
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101589514
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    Jun 18, 2014 5:51 AM GMT
    I do have a smart & final by me, I get bulk items from

    I don't have a Walmart, Kmart, Sams or Costco but do have a Target near by, with Albertsons buyout of Safeway, not sure how they are going to compete with lower wholesale prices
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    Jun 18, 2014 6:10 AM GMT
    I'm at the other end of the scale; I do almost all of my grocery shopping at FoodMaxx because their prices are insanely low. Up here Safeway is very big (corporate office is nearby in Pleasanton I think). I can go into FoodMaxx and buy several items and pay around $20; if I were to go to the Safeway a few blocks away I'd pay at least $40 for the same stuff. The Safeway is very upscale with the majority of its customers being white and middle income, while the FoodMaxx is definitely not with many of its customers being Latin/Hispanic, and you have to bag your own groceries. The selection is better at Safeway but given the price differential I'm not complaining about FoodMaxx's selection.

    FoodMaxx I think is owned by whoever owns Lucky, so you might see how the prices are at Lucky.
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    Jun 18, 2014 6:11 AM GMT
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Save_Mart_Supermarkets
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    Jun 18, 2014 6:25 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI'm at the other end of the scale; I do almost all of my grocery shopping at FoodMaxx because their prices are insanely low. Up here Safeway is very big (corporate office is nearby in Pleasanton I think). I can go into FoodMaxx and buy several items and pay around $20; if I were to go to the Safeway a few blocks away I'd pay at least $40 for the same stuff. The Safeway is very upscale with the majority of its customers being white and middle income, while the FoodMaxx is definitely not with many of its customers being Latin/Hispanic, and you have to bag your own groceries. The selection is better at Safeway but given the price differential I'm not complaining about FoodMaxx's selection.

    FoodMaxx I think is owned by whoever owns Lucky, so you might see how the prices are at Lucky.



    We have something like that down here, Stater Bros., but they are so far away, as well as Food 4 Less owned by Kroger/Ralphs, they too are far away, any money I would save at these stores would be eaten up in the gas used to get there and back, any frozen items could be melted by the time I spent over an hour in traffic icon_cry.gif

    Stater Bros.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stater_Bros.
    Food4Less
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_4_Less
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    Jun 18, 2014 6:42 AM GMT
    $6 for this size and store brand cottage cheese, I used to buy this all the time when it was $3.99, its now a luxury food item icon_evil.gif

    albertsons-cottage-cheese-low-44310.jpg


    This name brand and size is $7 at Alberstons! WTF, I miss my cottage cheese icon_evil.gif

    0004990034702_A?$img_size_380x380$
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jun 18, 2014 6:53 AM GMT
    oh prices are going higher

    the gov't fudges and fakes the CPI to peg social security increases to a minimum

    every dollar of deficit spending and Fed QE just lowers your purchasing power
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    Jun 18, 2014 7:17 AM GMT
    tj85016 saidoh prices are going higher

    the gov't fudges and fakes the CPI to peg social security increases to a minimum

    every dollar of deficit spending and Fed QE just lowers your purchasing power



    that's horrible, last time I bought the above store brand cottage cheese for $3.99 was between Christmas and New Year 2013, so 2014 started the spike as I have bypassed buying cottage cheese at least 3 times now this year, every time I have walked by and checked, the "discounted price" or tagged priced is $6

    very strange that I am being out priced on this particular item, I always liked cottage cheese, even as a kid, like my dad, but I will not pay $6,$7,$8,$9,$10 for something that lasts a couple meals and what was once, a very cheap, home staple dairy product, I will just reuse all those containers I have saved in the storage cabinet icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jun 18, 2014 8:47 AM GMT
    maybe try purchasing seasonal :3 Can try buying that box program where the food is sent from a local farm icon_biggrin.gif

    is supposed to be cost effective if you maintain a routine of cooking which.. Maybe you do?
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    Jun 18, 2014 12:43 PM GMT
    The price of grocery is up everywhere. I have seen a dozen medium size eggs jump from $0.99 to $2.59 in the space of 1 year. If you are in luck sometimes they are on sale 2 dozen for $3.00
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    Jun 18, 2014 1:56 PM GMT
    costCo
    works well for huge quantities so you dont have to shop every week.
    Target
    in my area is expensive for food items but functional for toothpaste, inexpensive hand lotion
    Rob's
    unlikely you have this in your area but you might have a store that sells dented cans, dry goods over stock


    i am a bit of a hoarder
    if chicken is on sale ill buy $150.00 of it and freeze it.

    junk food is expensive
    -Ground beef is expensive but fish fillets are half the price
    -milk is $4.00/gal where Silk-Plain soy milk works for less.
    -the vodka in plastic bottles to assure less breakage.
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    Jun 18, 2014 4:53 PM GMT
    Shop at the dollar store for some of the food items, collect and use coupons and buy generic or store brands to save money.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jun 18, 2014 10:14 PM GMT
    NorthwestBoy1980 saidWhy is the price of food going up so much but the government keeps reporting there is no inflation?


    they fudge the CPI numbers to cap Social Security payments

    then food companies just reduce package sizes and charge the same amount or more to maintain profits and margins

    every unit of food has a unit of energy involved, so there's that - plus packaging costs are up quite a bit, as is transportation
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    Jun 18, 2014 10:21 PM GMT
    The big food industry is just trying to help us be healthier. Since nobody seems to want to move more, they're creating conditions that cause us to eat less.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Jun 19, 2014 1:55 AM GMT
    NorthwestBoy1980 saidWhy is the price of food going up so much but the government keeps reporting there is no inflation?


    Perhaps it's the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington. Inflation Should trigger higher bond yields...and the cost of keeping this lead balloon in the air.

    or
    The transition from a real economy to a speculative casino economy that is manipulated by a few market movers.

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/04/27/how_goldman_sachs_created_the_food_crisis
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    Jun 19, 2014 2:19 AM GMT
    hate to admit it.....Walmart, with add match....I can pick up a TON of groceries for under 40.00.

    I get chicken, strawberries, salmon, Kayle, spinach and beans and lentils and a lot more.

    I raise chickens and sell eggs and that pays for mine. I do shop at the local Farmers Market too. Although, they can be costly so I might trade.

    I look for reduced and sale items. I like fresh so it's a challenge.

    We have a very competitive market here in Metro Phoenix so prices are low.

    When I go to LA I do freak out and can't believe how peaches are over 2.00 a lb. when they are grown there.......

    I feel your pain!!

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    Jun 19, 2014 2:53 AM GMT
    wild_sky360 said
    NorthwestBoy1980 saidWhy is the price of food going up so much but the government keeps reporting there is no inflation?


    Perhaps it's the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington. Inflation Should trigger higher bond yields...and the cost of keeping this lead balloon in the air.

    or
    The transition from a real economy to a speculative casino economy that is manipulated by a few market movers.

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/04/27/how_goldman_sachs_created_the_food_crisis



    ^OH NO, just what we need, a growing food bubble, isn't there anything the banks haven't touched icon_rolleyes.gif
    housing, credit/debt, student loans, food... our lives are bought, traded and paid for by the 1% icon_rolleyes.gif

    "All the while, the index funds continue to prosper, the bankers pocket the profits, and the world's poor teeter on the brink of starvation"
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    Jun 19, 2014 3:16 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThe big food industry is just trying to help us be healthier. Since nobody seems to want to move more, they're creating conditions that cause us to eat less.



    Growing up, our family would figure the amount of bags it took to leave the grocery store with vs the amount spent on those groceries, before plastic bags, we just had paper

    In a 30 year span:

    100% inflation?


    1984

    10 grocery paper bags full = $60.00


    2014

    1 grocery paper bag full = $60.00


    Food prices appear to be in line with 30 years of gas prices although more in check

    Historical Gas Prices
    http://www.davemanuel.com/2010/12/30/historical-gas-prices-in-the-united-states/

    Food Price Inflation
    http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R40545.pdf

    Rapidly Inflating Global Commodity Markets, 2006 to 2008

    Several economic factors emerged in late 2005 that began to gradually push market prices higher
    for both raw agricultural commodities and energy costs.12 These factors included the rapid
    development of the U.S. biofuels sector, as well as rising consumer incomes, not just in the
    United States but globally, which sparked demand for meat and dairy products, food and feed
    grains, as well as energy and transportation resources, and a wide assortment of raw materials
    ranging from minerals and metals to coal and petroleum. Driven largely by these demand forces,
    both general inflation and food price inflation began to accelerate in 2007 and reached a peak in
    2008 when the All-Items CPI reached 3.8%, highest since 1991, and the All-Food CPI peaked at
    5.5%, highest since 1990 (Figure 7 and Figure icon_cool.gif.
    For a given level of income, higher prices mean lower effective purchasing power, since the same
    household budget will now acquire a smaller volume of products. The negative aspects of the
    sharp rise in retail food prices in 2007 and 2008 were magnified by a global financial crisis that
    emerged in 2008 and led to declines in both real (i.e., inflation-adjusted) gross domestic product
    (GDP) and real household disposable personal income (DPI)—after 15 consecutive years of
    positive growth both aggregate income indicators fell modestly in 2008, real GDP by 0.3%, and
    real DPI per capita by 0.2%.
    10
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Jun 19, 2014 3:32 AM GMT
    Email companies for sample packs and coupons. They give good ones.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 19, 2014 5:53 AM GMT
    Use coupons. They certainly help.