Any runners (or indeed anyone?!?) use a foam roller for stretching out? Or a ball for hamstrings?

  • suedeheadscot

    Posts: 1130

    Jun 19, 2014 7:38 PM GMT
    I have started to try to do a few more stretches at home to try to cut back on sports physio massages. I just wondered if anyone found them helpful? l have spent a good couple of minutes rolling around and it felt painful, watching a video I found on youtube instructing me how to do it.

    I have been told to try to get a cricket ball for the hamstrings, to try to massage the knots out of it.

    Wondered what you guys do...
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    Jun 19, 2014 9:06 PM GMT
    Love using a foam roller after a workout on my whole body. Sometimes I use it to warm up as well.

    Usually I find the spots that hurt and roll over them a couple of times. Either the pain stops, or gets worse, then I stop...
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    Jun 20, 2014 4:01 AM GMT
    some people at the gym use them. i never have but they make me wonder..

    bhp91126 saidUsually I find the spots that hurt and roll over them a couple of times. Either the pain stops, or gets worse, then I stop...


    lol
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    Jun 20, 2014 5:44 AM GMT
    I bought one at the recommendation of my physical therapist. She didn't recommend it for what was ailing me (a very slight tenderness in the right of my hip) but because I told her I ran. I didn't see any benefit from it and it seemed like a lot of (as in too much) work for apparently not doing anything, so I stopped using it. I was already stretching after my runs. I'm only doing 45 minutes of cardio 3 times a week (15 mins stationary bicycling, 30 mins running) so I'm obviously not pounding my body.
  • suedeheadscot

    Posts: 1130

    Jun 21, 2014 6:14 PM GMT
    Thanks all!
  • MrPeanut

    Posts: 11

    Jun 21, 2014 6:20 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI bought one at the recommendation of my physical therapist. She didn't recommend it for what was ailing me (a very slight tenderness in the right of my hip) but because I told her I ran. I didn't see any benefit from it and it seemed like a lot of (as in too much) work for apparently not doing anything, so I stopped using it. I was already stretching after my runs. I'm only doing 45 minutes of cardio 3 times a week (15 mins stationary bicycling, 30 mins running) so I'm obviously not pounding my body.


    Even healthy runners should do some kind of SMR stretching prior to static stretching. Your body is constantly creating a fibrous layer of connective tissue called fascia. The stress from running can prevent the body from forming fascia in the correct pattern leading to decreased range of motion and increasing the chance of injury. SMR prevents that.
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    Jun 21, 2014 6:40 PM GMT
    MrPeanut said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI bought one at the recommendation of my physical therapist. She didn't recommend it for what was ailing me (a very slight tenderness in the right of my hip) but because I told her I ran. I didn't see any benefit from it and it seemed like a lot of (as in too much) work for apparently not doing anything, so I stopped using it. I was already stretching after my runs. I'm only doing 45 minutes of cardio 3 times a week (15 mins stationary bicycling, 30 mins running) so I'm obviously not pounding my body.


    Even healthy runners should do some kind of SMR stretching prior to static stretching. Your body is constantly creating a fibrous layer of connective tissue called fascia. The stress from running can prevent the body from forming fascia in the correct pattern leading to decreased range of motion and increasing the chance of injury. SMR prevents that.

    That's the theory and it sounds logical. But I'd love to see some research that proves it.
  • MrPeanut

    Posts: 11

    Jun 21, 2014 6:48 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    MrPeanut said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI bought one at the recommendation of my physical therapist. She didn't recommend it for what was ailing me (a very slight tenderness in the right of my hip) but because I told her I ran. I didn't see any benefit from it and it seemed like a lot of (as in too much) work for apparently not doing anything, so I stopped using it. I was already stretching after my runs. I'm only doing 45 minutes of cardio 3 times a week (15 mins stationary bicycling, 30 mins running) so I'm obviously not pounding my body.


    Even healthy runners should do some kind of SMR stretching prior to static stretching. Your body is constantly creating a fibrous layer of connective tissue called fascia. The stress from running can prevent the body from forming fascia in the correct pattern leading to decreased range of motion and increasing the chance of injury. SMR prevents that.

    That's the theory and it sounds logical. But I'd love to see some research that proves it.


    Most recently "Foam Rolling and Static Stretching on Passive Hip Flexion Range of Motion" in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation in January 2014
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    Jun 21, 2014 7:24 PM GMT
    MrPeanut said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    MrPeanut said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI bought one at the recommendation of my physical therapist. She didn't recommend it for what was ailing me (a very slight tenderness in the right of my hip) but because I told her I ran. I didn't see any benefit from it and it seemed like a lot of (as in too much) work for apparently not doing anything, so I stopped using it. I was already stretching after my runs. I'm only doing 45 minutes of cardio 3 times a week (15 mins stationary bicycling, 30 mins running) so I'm obviously not pounding my body.


    Even healthy runners should do some kind of SMR stretching prior to static stretching. Your body is constantly creating a fibrous layer of connective tissue called fascia. The stress from running can prevent the body from forming fascia in the correct pattern leading to decreased range of motion and increasing the chance of injury. SMR prevents that.

    That's the theory and it sounds logical. But I'd love to see some research that proves it.


    Most recently "Foam Rolling and Static Stretching on Passive Hip Flexion Range of Motion" in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation in January 2014

    A quote from one link about the article says "They therefore concluded that foam rolling can lead to the same significant improvements in hip flexion range of motion as passive static stretching."

    http://tinyurl.com/lwwnkpp

    But to continue being quarrelsome and nit-picking, notice that they say it increases the range of motion, not that it reduces injury. That's the sticky point for me. People are assuming that increasing the range of motion decreases injury, which as I said sounds logical but I don't think has been proven with research.

    I didn't realize until a year or so ago that there's a controversy about stretching; some runners think it can lead to injuries and that you're better off not stretching. That surprised me. My theory is that it's better to stretch after you run, when your muscles are thoroughly warmed up, and to be very careful to not overstretch.
  • MrPeanut

    Posts: 11

    Jun 21, 2014 7:54 PM GMT
    There have been studies on this. A study from 2008 found that their was a greater decrease in hip mobility of soccer players with acl ruptures over the control group. They concluded that their was a strong association between decreased hip range of motion and ACL ruptures likely do to internal rotation lessening.

    As for static stretching before a run. The energy expenditure can lead to decreased performance. Also studies show a stretched muscle is left in a state where it cannot exert maximum force, and is also left in a weakened state that can lead to stability problems if you follow it with an activity like running.