I'm up in Coeur d'Alene

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2014 12:43 AM GMT
    Pretty cool environment. It's a little overwhelming, this being my first ironman (and actually, my first triathlon).

    Water is currently 64 degrees, which is a nice change from the 55 I was seeing a while back.

    Rain could be a factor. It was raining on and off all through Oregon, Washington, and here in town.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jun 28, 2014 3:17 PM GMT
    I have been told that northern Idaho is very beautiful, scenic country. The very best of luck in your first ironman triathlon. I am sure that you will have a real blasticon_biggrin.gif Watch out for those them big grizzly bears.
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    Jun 28, 2014 3:56 PM GMT
    I've passed through Couer d'Alene many times, made some overnight stops there. Had one of my motorcycles serviced there, while crossing the Rockies. I have mostly good memories of it.

    Coming into Couer d'Alene one time from the east I was flying down the Interstate at some hellacious speed, when I encountered a turn that I thought was a bit tight. It gave me very short sight lines, so I said to myself: "Bob, you better slow down, you have limited stopping distance on this motorcycle when it's heeled way over." And so I braked below the speed limit, I think 65 mph along that stretch.

    Not 5 seconds later I came across a whole herd of deer crossing the highway on that blind curve. I had to jam on my brakes and come to a complete stop. If I had been still going around 90 there was no way I could have stopped in time. For once my instincts served me well, and probably saved my life.

    And that's a memory of riding into Couer d'Alene that's I'll always have, whenever I hear that name. Along with staying at cheap motels, and eating at some kind of "Kettle" restaurant, a chain that I later learned is uber-homophobic.
  • mrk100

    Posts: 157

    Jun 28, 2014 4:51 PM GMT
    CFL_Oakland saidPretty cool environment. It's a little overwhelming, this being my first ironman (and actually, my first triathlon).

    Water is currently 64 degrees, which is a nice change from the 55 I was seeing a while back.

    Rain could be a factor. It was raining on and off all through Oregon, Washington, and here in town.


    Hey CFL,
    Good luck with your first Ironman and props for jumping right into long distance. Try to have fun with it without putting too much pressure on yourself and make sure your fueling is on point. From your run and cycling posts you should do well on that course.
    Hope the weather holds out for you.

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    Jun 30, 2014 3:26 AM GMT
    It was a rough day. Very windy up here this morning, with whitecaps on the lake. And the swim start points you right in to it. I got in, started swimming, and promptly everything went wrong. My goggles started leaking, I kept getting mouthfuls of water instead of air, and I was fighting for space in a crowded lake. After a few minutes, I had to grab onto a kayak and hang on for a while to catch my breath, fix my goggles, and calm down.

    On the way out, there was massive congestion at each buoy, as people got off track. People kicking, climbing on top of you, everything. It was a huge relief to reach the end of the first side and head in with the waves. Still fighting for space at every turn, but I could make progress. Occasionally I found open water, but then I always suspected that I was headed off course. I'm not a strong swimmer, and with the chop, I managed 38:40 or so. I can live with that.

    Second lap I was calmer, the congestion was only bad in spots, but there was added fun as people would grab my feet and then I would cramp! I may have shouted "GET OFF OF ME" once...I was surprised to see that I was slower, and didn't get out until maybe 1:22?

    Took a while in transition. I wasn't so worried about this...I knew from my swim that my time goals were probably out of reach.

    It was nice to get on the bike. I felt crampy, but nothing came of it. First 14 miles were very nice. I was on pace, and feeling strong. I started to think maybe this would work out well after all. But then I mentioned the wind...from mile 14 to mile 35, there was a strong headwind constantly blowing (and it is uphill). For added fun, you have to repeat this section from mile 70 to mile 91.

    I was struggling with the drafting rules. It felt virtually impossible NOT to violate them. They didn't seem to be enforcing strictly, but having a laxly enforced rule makes it hard on people who try to play honestly. This uphill section was bad because everyone slowed way down in the wind. I loved the hills - my California training has paid off, and I was generally cruising past people on the uphills.

    But, I was the only person there without a tri bike, and people generally caught my in the windy sections and on downhills. I honestly think the tri bike might have been worth 40 minutes in that wide-open course.

    Coming back, miles 35 to 56 was amazing. I was cruising at 30 MPH and very relaxed. Nutrition seemed to work out well. 56 to 70 felt good again, and then we had to take a second pass up the hills, and into the wind. I knew it was coming this time, and was more mentally prepared, but it was still slow going. Many other athletes commented that it was a very slow day. I got in around 6 hours for the bike - about 30 minutes slower than I'd hoped.

    One thing that was really taking a toll on me is that because of the wind, I was putting a lot of strain on my shoulders trying to stay low on the drops. By the end of the bike, I was destroyed. I could barely sit down or stand up. The pain was excruciating. Also, my hands were numb, and I couldn't tie my shoes in transition, so it was another slow transition.

    But I got up and out, and immediately felt better on the run...well, except for the two times I had to stop and tie my shoes. First mile was 7:50 and second was 7:10. I was ready to go. Considering how destroyed I was after the bike I thought I would just try to hold 7:00 miles (not the 6:30s that I'd hoped for), and if I felt better later on, I could pick it up. I did end up dropping a few 6:30s, but it's hard to say, since the mile markers were screwed up.

    I felt so fucking good on the run. It's my strongest event by far, and once I started it, I knew everything would be OK. You'd think that after a rough bike and rough swim, I'd have a lot of trouble on the run, but no. I did miss my goal, but not by that much.

    Now here's the kicker. I was not passed once on the run. Not once, in 26.2 miles.

    People commented how strong I looked and at one point, I exclaimed "I'VE BEEN WAITING ALL FUCKING DAY FOR THIS!"icon_lol.gif

    Finished the run in about 3:03. Haven't seen my official time, but I think it was 10:41.

    Now I'm exhausted - it was a really rough day. Much more than I'd expected, but you do the best you can on the day, and I don't feel like this was a bad debut for me.
  • mrk100

    Posts: 157

    Jun 30, 2014 12:46 PM GMT
    Great job and impressive run! Definitely invest in a Tri Bike if your going to stick with it.
    We had a similar start in Tahoe last year but with 29 degree temps and snow the day before.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jul 01, 2014 11:49 AM GMT
    CFL_Oakland saidIt was a rough day. Very windy up here this morning, with whitecaps on the lake. And the swim start points you right in to it. I got in, started swimming, and promptly everything went wrong. My goggles started leaking, I kept getting mouthfuls of water instead of air, and I was fighting for space in a crowded lake. After a few minutes, I had to grab onto a kayak and hang on for a while to catch my breath, fix my goggles, and calm down.

    On the way out, there was massive congestion at each buoy, as people got off track. People kicking, climbing on top of you, everything. It was a huge relief to reach the end of the first side and head in with the waves. Still fighting for space at every turn, but I could make progress. Occasionally I found open water, but then I always suspected that I was headed off course. I'm not a strong swimmer, and with the chop, I managed 38:40 or so. I can live with that.

    Second lap I was calmer, the congestion was only bad in spots, but there was added fun as people would grab my feet and then I would cramp! I may have shouted "GET OFF OF ME" once...I was surprised to see that I was slower, and didn't get out until maybe 1:22?

    Took a while in transition. I wasn't so worried about this...I knew from my swim that my time goals were probably out of reach.

    It was nice to get on the bike. I felt crampy, but nothing came of it. First 14 miles were very nice. I was on pace, and feeling strong. I started to think maybe this would work out well after all. But then I mentioned the wind...from mile 14 to mile 35, there was a strong headwind constantly blowing (and it is uphill). For added fun, you have to repeat this section from mile 70 to mile 91.

    I was struggling with the drafting rules. It felt virtually impossible NOT to violate them. They didn't seem to be enforcing strictly, but having a laxly enforced rule makes it hard on people who try to play honestly. This uphill section was bad because everyone slowed way down in the wind. I loved the hills - my California training has paid off, and I was generally cruising past people on the uphills.

    But, I was the only person there without a tri bike, and people generally caught my in the windy sections and on downhills. I honestly think the tri bike might have been worth 40 minutes in that wide-open course.

    Coming back, miles 35 to 56 was amazing. I was cruising at 30 MPH and very relaxed. Nutrition seemed to work out well. 56 to 70 felt good again, and then we had to take a second pass up the hills, and into the wind. I knew it was coming this time, and was more mentally prepared, but it was still slow going. Many other athletes commented that it was a very slow day. I got in around 6 hours for the bike - about 30 minutes slower than I'd hoped.

    One thing that was really taking a toll on me is that because of the wind, I was putting a lot of strain on my shoulders trying to stay low on the drops. By the end of the bike, I was destroyed. I could barely sit down or stand up. The pain was excruciating. Also, my hands were numb, and I couldn't tie my shoes in transition, so it was another slow transition.

    But I got up and out, and immediately felt better on the run...well, except for the two times I had to stop and tie my shoes. First mile was 7:50 and second was 7:10. I was ready to go. Considering how destroyed I was after the bike I thought I would just try to hold 7:00 miles (not the 6:30s that I'd hoped for), and if I felt better later on, I could pick it up. I did end up dropping a few 6:30s, but it's hard to say, since the mile markers were screwed up.

    I felt so fucking good on the run. It's my strongest event by far, and once I started it, I knew everything would be OK. You'd think that after a rough bike and rough swim, I'd have a lot of trouble on the run, but no. I did miss my goal, but not by that much.

    Now here's the kicker. I was not passed once on the run. Not once, in 26.2 miles.

    People commented how strong I looked and at one point, I exclaimed "I'VE BEEN WAITING ALL FUCKING DAY FOR THIS!"icon_lol.gif

    Finished the run in about 3:03. Haven't seen my official time, but I think it was 10:41.

    Now I'm exhausted - it was a really rough day. Much more than I'd expected, but you do the best you can on the day, and I don't feel like this was a bad debut for me.
    Swimming in a lake with white caps in windy conditions. Sounds quite risky to me. Did you feel any nasty undercurrents while in the water other than people grabbing your feeticon_question.gif Bodies of water that are white capped during windy conditions tend to have greatly activated undercurrents.