Stereotypes about Canada or Canadians or anything really???

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 3:56 AM GMT
    Hello everyone.

    I thought it would be a fun idea to hear from anyone, anywhere any stereotypes about Canada/Canadians that you might have or have heard. Let me know whether it is dumb, silly, funny or just plain rude lol…anything really. I live a couple hours away from Detroit, Michigan and visit the States all the time and think Canada and the United States are pretty similar. Really the only things I have heard so far just from being over in the United States is about how Canadians supposedly say “eh” a lot? Also that we have accents, and about our ridiculous currency (coins) Loonie $1.00, Tooney $2.00 and colored bills. Please post…

    $5.00 – Blue
    $10.00 – Purple
    $20.00 – Green
    $50.00 – Red
    $100.00 – Brown
    $1,000.00 – Reddish purple
  • Salubrious

    Posts: 420

    Sep 27, 2007 4:27 AM GMT
    You enjoy moose.
  • Laurence

    Posts: 942

    Sep 27, 2007 9:27 AM GMT
    If you meet a Canadian and ask him which part of America he comes from you will have to work extra hard to get him to have sex with you.

    Canadians are very touchy about being mistaken for American.

    Loz
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 5:13 PM GMT
    Of course, Canadians are supposed to be hockey-crazed freaks!! icon_lol.gif

    * Then, there's also the issue of the American/Canadian distinctiveness. Canadians (or so I've heard) have an inferiority complex as it relates to the United States.

    * Canadians' only contribution to food/culture is Canadian bacon.

    * There are "mounties" instead of police.

    * Canada's very cold- the people need to stay inside 6-9 months out of the year.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 5:24 PM GMT
    LaurenceIf you meet a Canadian and ask him which part of America he comes from you will have to work extra hard to get him to have sex with you.


    Um... actually, check out a map. Canada makes up a big part of North America. Some people (though mostly from southern countries, in my experience) get really touchy about people using "American" to mean only US citizens. Still, the only alternative that has been seriously proposed, "Usonian" seems kind of ugly. When someone called me that in Switzerland, it took me a while to figure out what he was saying.

    Oh, but this is supposed to be about Canada... Eh, if you've seen one flannel shirt, you've seen 'em all. Ya know what I'm talkin aboot?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 5:32 PM GMT
    Wut aboot that eh?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 5:32 PM GMT
    I love degrassi!!!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 5:42 PM GMT
    Kenny vs. Spenny ROCKS!
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Sep 27, 2007 5:56 PM GMT
    I often mention to Americans that the biggest mall in North America is down the street from my house, and the usual response is "You live near Mall of America?" No, the Mall of America isn't in Canada.

    I've worked for several American publishers. They're often surprised when they find out that I live closer to Anchorage than to New York City -- six hundred miles closer.

    The biggest misconception is that there is a Canadian accent. I sound nothing like people from the east. Albertans sound like Midwesterners. You have to go east as far as Thunder Bay, Ontario before you hear a different accent, and then it sounds sort of Minnesotan. And no one here sounds like Frances McDormand in Fargo.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Sep 27, 2007 5:59 PM GMT
    Having grown up in a border city, the general stereotypes of Canadians I was used to:

    Exceedingly polite.

    Pronouncing the letter combination ou as oo (Aboot instead of about)

    Used to snow nearly year round

    Pinkos

    From my actual experience with large numbers of Canadians, not all of those are false.
  • trvlmscl

    Posts: 136

    Sep 27, 2007 6:17 PM GMT
    twisterguy20
    * Canadians' only contribution to food/culture is Canadian bacon.


    Ah, memories of Canada. Sort of a Super Troopers pilgrimage. Kind of gross but still worth the experience. Which food group am I talking about? (Yes, it does appear to be a food group of its own up North)

    ... POUTINE! (french fries topped with cheese curds & gravy, wonderful for gut maintenance)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 6:40 PM GMT
    I saw Shania Twain making that fry/gravy dish on Martha's show - and it has been eating at me what it was called - thanks for solving that mystery redmcs
  • red_series

    Posts: 136

    Sep 27, 2007 6:57 PM GMT
    I was totally destroyed when I realized you can't get poutine at any of the fast food chains in the states. Also, you people don't have Big Xtra's at McDonalds...what the hell. As for the snow, I live in the burbs of Vancouver, it's the same temperature all year around--more or less. And good call on Kenny vs Spenny McGay. Oh, and also, when I go through my change I come up with something in the $5.00 range, hurrah for the toonie
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 7:14 PM GMT
    I never even heard of poutine in my life until about a year or so ago. But then I live in a state (Arizona)that borders our other neighbor so I am more familiar w/ their quirks than Canadians.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2007 7:17 PM GMT
    Americans have a tendency to think of Canadians (if they think of them at all) as pretty much the same (except for the Francophones). I find Canadians have more in common with the Americans that live in the states that border them, then other Canadians! For example, people from New Brunswick have more in common with people from Maine then they do with people from Ontario. Ontarians have more in common with New Yorkers then with Albertans, etc..

    By the way the stereotype of "eh" has a strong basis, I use it all the time when I am talking and rarely notice it. As for the money, "Americans" (or United Statsians since by definition Canada is part of America) don't realize that their money is the odd one. Virtually ever where you go in the world (e.g. Europe, UK) money is multi-coloured and coins are heavily used.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 8:23 AM GMT
    Aren't they all lumberjacks or mounties who wear those silly hats?

    Canadians are also supposed to be really boring and a bit dim.

    But maybe an American told me that.

    And they like wearing beige trousers. And they're not very good at dancing. Or adding up.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 8:39 AM GMT
    Yeah, what is it with Americans and their dollar bills? How weird is that?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 2:42 PM GMT
    LaurenceIf you meet a Canadian and ask him which part of America he comes from you will have to work extra hard to get him to have sex with you.

    I've found it's easier to get laid in Europe if I say I'm Canadian.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Sep 29, 2007 5:05 PM GMT
    Here is a another significant difference between Canada and the USA, Canada officially uses the international metric system of measurement like the rest of the world. When you cross the Lewiston-Queenston Bridge from New York into Ontario, all the distances and speed limits are posted in kilometers instead of miles. Another significant difference between the two percieved similar North American nations, Canada did not violently rebel and break away from its mother country, Great Britain. The USA on the other hand did violently rebel and declared itself independent of British rule. In this case, the USA has more in common with Mexico since that country also violently rebelled and declared itself independent of Spanish rule. Here is still another difference, Canadian cities did not suffer long decades of decline, disinvestment, and violent crime like most older American cities did between 1950 and the present decade. Canadian cities like cities throughout the rest of the developed world have sprawling suburbs but unlike the USA, Canadian, Australian, Japanese, and European suburbs grew because of their close proximity to a large city. In the USA, suburbs grew at the complete expense of cities resulting in population and economic decline of the cities while the suburbs grew rapidly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 5:36 PM GMT
    art_smassAnd no one here sounds like Frances McDormand in Fargo.


    Yeah, but we want you to. At least put on a good show for the tourists.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 5:59 PM GMT
    I love my Country period!icon_biggrin.gif
  • Italianboi28

    Posts: 2

    Sep 29, 2007 6:14 PM GMT
    i live right across the bridge from Detroit MI and love it b/c i get the best of both worlds..
    Food. shopping, sports, and the list goes on..
    Something that people in Chatham all the way to Waterloo cannot do.. Ther is no pro teams in Waterloo all the way to Windsor, and all i do is cross over and im there..
    Also (well before the dollar went to par) could we work over in the US and get paid over double..
    But about the differences, I dont looking at the differences as a negative, more then i embrace them...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 29, 2007 11:10 PM GMT
    Canadians have the highest consumption per capita of donuts of any county in the world. The ultimate irony is that Tim Horton's is owned by Wendy's, an American company.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 30, 2007 6:01 AM GMT
    Being from Michigan and living in Detroit, I see no difference really.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 4:16 PM GMT
    I'm from Seattle and love visiting Vancouver B.C.

    It is very common for Seattleites to head to Vancouver for the weekend and vice versa.

    Not sure if it counts as a stereotype, but many Seattleites say Vancouver men in general are much better looking than men from Seattle. Although I also hear many of my Canadian friends say the opposite.

    Doesn't matter. I love taking the train to Vancouver. It is such a beautiful city. Oh yeah, you gotta love those "twonies". icon_wink.gif