Study: People prefer electric shocks to being alone with their thoughts

  • metta

    Posts: 39112

    Jul 05, 2014 6:48 AM GMT
    Study: People prefer electric shocks to being alone with their thoughts

    http://boingboing.net/2014/07/03/study-people-prefer-electric.html


    http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6192/75
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 05, 2014 6:55 AM GMT
    but, being alone with ones thoughts can be electric shocks..

    Maybe people need to sort their baggage more deftly..

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • WrestlerBoy

    Posts: 1903

    Jul 06, 2014 12:51 AM GMT
    Abstract of the Study:

    "In 11 studies, we found that participants typically did not enjoy spending 6 to 15 minutes in a room by themselves with nothing to do but think, that they enjoyed doing mundane external activities much more, and that many preferred to administer electric shocks to themselves instead of being left alone with their thoughts. Most people seem to prefer to be doing something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative."

    Emerson once said we (the U.S.) were a fundamentally anti-intellectual society, in that we thought of "farming", say, as a verb, as doing something, but we didn't think of "thinking" as doing something. Now, look at the last line of that abstract. Some things never change.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jul 06, 2014 1:55 PM GMT
    WrestlerBoy saidAbstract of the Study:

    "In 11 studies, we found that participants typically did not enjoy spending 6 to 15 minutes in a room by themselves with nothing to do but think, that they enjoyed doing mundane external activities much more, and that many preferred to administer electric shocks to themselves instead of being left alone with their thoughts. Most people seem to prefer to be doing something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative."

    Emerson once said we (the U.S.) were a fundamentally anti-intellectual society, in that we thought of "farming", say, as a verb, as doing something, but we didn't think of "thinking" as doing something. Now, look at the last line of that abstract. Some things never change.


    Thomas' Jefferson and Paine would disagree, but we did have a lot of English and Dutch here early on, so maybe Emerson was right icon_lol.gif
  • WrestlerBoy

    Posts: 1903

    Jul 06, 2014 2:23 PM GMT
    tj85016 said
    WrestlerBoy saidAbstract of the Study:

    "In 11 studies, we found that participants typically did not enjoy spending 6 to 15 minutes in a room by themselves with nothing to do but think, that they enjoyed doing mundane external activities much more, and that many preferred to administer electric shocks to themselves instead of being left alone with their thoughts. Most people seem to prefer to be doing something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative."

    Emerson once said we (the U.S.) were a fundamentally anti-intellectual society, in that we thought of "farming", say, as a verb, as doing something, but we didn't think of "thinking" as doing something. Now, look at the last line of that abstract. Some things never change.


    Thomas' Jefferson and Paine would disagree, but we did have a lot of English and Dutch here early on, so maybe Emerson was right icon_lol.gif


    Early on? And Wilson and Roosevelt were what; Japanese and Indian? icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 06, 2014 5:44 PM GMT
    I've often said, particularly back when it was in vogue for others to laud their boredom on craigslist to entice sex, that you could lock me away in a white walled room with no windows and I'd remain thoroughly entertained.

    I adore thinking. It's probably one of the better reasons to not be dead. One of the truly wonderful dream states to enter is an area of mind whereby all dreaming ceases, all external contact with the sensory world disconnects, such that all you have are your thoughts existing in otherwise nothingness. It must sound to the uninitiated physical ear torturously lonely yet experiencing the self by itself is not scary at all. Being solo has a way of making sense to the soul.

    But living is about interacting. And the brain's plasticity might in part depend upon our attentions outside of ourselves. Certainly we create new neurological paths through our own thoughts but even when we think, even brilliance can be for that particular person mundane, rote, and so, by itself, not as conducive to plasticity as might a new day on an assembly line or arguing before the court. Changing a job, from assembly line to janitor might do more for plasticity than changing venue or taking on a new case argued with time worn though still effective enough to get the job done skills.

    So the point is well taken that people need to become more comfortable with their thinking, with thinking at all. But also what animated life does not require sleep? The mind tends to race and sometimes if you can't get away from your thoughts they will overtake.

    I, however, prefer meditation to electroshock therapy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 06, 2014 6:52 PM GMT
    Sounds like 6 to 15 minutes of valuable meditation time wasted.

    Instead of focusing on the negative outcomes of the study, maybe they should focus on educating people on the value of their own thoughts and how to control them.