10 Lesser-Known Things White Vinegar Can Do For Cooking & Kitchen Cleaning

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    Jul 06, 2014 1:33 PM GMT
    I know this is like "Hints From Heloise" but I thought interesting nevertheless. After all, isn't the kitchen the second favorite room in a gay man's home? icon_wink.gif

    http://www.thedailymeal.com/click-here-see-vinegar-10-surprising-things-it-can-do-slideshow?slide=1

    (Like most slide shows of this kind, hit the pause button and advance manually for easier reading)
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    Jul 06, 2014 4:06 PM GMT
    Most of us have heard of nuking lemon water to clean the inside of microwaves, but to avoid "Easy Off" chemicals (if you're "green" or a "health nut") and running the energy-bleeding self-cleaning feature on one's oven too often (not recommended), my high end oven manufacturer recommended baking water with vinegar at 400 degrees for an hour to steam off baked on crud. It works! The crud wipes right off afterwards.

    A few years before "Mad Men" aired and retro late '50s/early '60s became fashionable, I read a couple of "how to" books from that era because I suspected they'd be a scream (and they were).

    One was "Corporate Etiquette" with its references to country clubs, 3 martini lunches and highballs; the other was "Hints from Heloise," and lemme tell ya, nothing was more exhausting than reading that book. Any housewife (pearls-wearing and otherwise) from that pre-Fantastik, pre-Windex era that would even attempt half of those hints would be dead within months. Vinegar, bleach and ammonia weren't cost-effective enough; the proper housewife, whose job it seemed was to save every hard-earned penny her husband made, was to find and/or make her own, even cheaper cleaning solutions. I wouldn't have been surprised if Heloise recommended scouring with twigs. Even if women then sent their husband's shirts out for ironing, they'd have been done in just by ironing their sheets and pressing and starching (with what...water they'd just boiled saved corncobs in expressly for that purpose?) their petticoats! Move over, women's lib icons - the one woman who probably did more to usher in the women's movement was Heloise.
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    Jul 06, 2014 4:38 PM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    One was "Corporate Etiquette" with its references to country clubs, 3 martini lunches and highballs; the other was "Hints from Heloise," and lemme tell ya, nothing was more exhausting than reading that book. Any housewife (pearls-wearing and otherwise) from that pre-Fantastik, pre-Windex era that would even attempt half of those hints would be dead within months. Vinegar, bleach and ammonia weren't cost-effective enough; the proper housewife, whose job it seemed was to save every hard-earned penny her husband made, was to find and/or make her own, even cheaper cleaning solutions. I wouldn't have been surprised if Heloise recommended scouring with twigs. Even if women then sent their husband's shirts out for ironing, they'd have been done in just by ironing their sheets and pressing and starching (with what...water they'd just boiled saved corncobs in expressly for that purpose?) their petticoats! Move over, women's lib icons - the one woman who probably did more to usher in the women's movement was Heloise.

    I'm confused about your point. Are you saying that Heloise fostered the idea of the "kitchen wife"? Against which libbers rebeled?

    Whether you did or not, I can see that point. Whereas I just read clever everyday hints from Heloise to solve daily problems we face in our modern world, that we can all use. Maybe because I'm a man.

    If Heloise reinforced a servant model for the stereotypical US wife than I would object to that. I never saw it that way. I thought anybody could use those hints. Single men & women as well as married couples.

    So I dunno. I just focus on practicalities, and leave the cultural implications to others. Except to say that I don't endorse models where women have an inferior domestic position. My professional career Mother was very far from inferior, as was my wife who became an Army Colonel (and later much more), nor do I think any woman should be considered inferior.

    I may have my fun with behavioral stereotypes, of straight women, gays, straight men, lesbians, etc, but social inferiority is never on my mind.
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    Jul 07, 2014 11:10 PM GMT
    eagermuscle said my high end oven manufacturer recommended baking water with vinegar at 400 degrees for an hour to steam off baked on crud. It works! The crud wipes right off afterwards.


    What's the percentage of water to vinegar for the oven?

    thx
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    Jul 07, 2014 11:24 PM GMT
    ShiftyJK08 said
    eagermuscle said my high end oven manufacturer recommended baking water with vinegar at 400 degrees for an hour to steam off baked on crud. It works! The crud wipes right off afterwards.


    What's the percentage of water to vinegar for the oven?

    thx

    In the slide show link I provided, they suggested 50/50 white vinegar and water for a microwave. Perhaps that would work as well with a conventional oven.
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    Jul 08, 2014 12:09 AM GMT
    Hints from Heloise! OMG! That's a blast from the past.

    There there was this...

    http://www.amazon.com/Phyllis-Dillers-housekeeping-hints-Diller/dp/B00005WMD2

    bc550a6f811dbc035184d511fb93d4c8.jpg
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    Jul 08, 2014 1:01 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    ShiftyJK08 said
    eagermuscle said my high end oven manufacturer recommended baking water with vinegar at 400 degrees for an hour to steam off baked on crud. It works! The crud wipes right off afterwards.


    What's the percentage of water to vinegar for the oven?

    thx

    In the slide show link I provided, they suggested 50/50 white vinegar and water for a microwave. Perhaps that would work as well with a conventional oven.


    Maybe. Mine both seem to be made of the same enameled steel inside.