What in the HELL is this?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 08, 2014 6:03 PM GMT
    If you're up to doing some online research, find out what kind of bug this is. Walked past it today and snapped a shot.

    bigbug.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 08, 2014 6:21 PM GMT
    DavidDolce's and Jmusmc85's son?
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    Jul 08, 2014 6:26 PM GMT
    It's the elusive "loose change bug" (Latin: elusium bugaboo). They're attracted to coins, pictured here with a US quarter. Some are large enough to fly off with dimes or pennies, but the one here will probably just drag this 25-cent piece off to its nest. This is why lost change in certain parts of the US disappears so quickly. You were fortunate to catch one in the act, but then your candid Nature photography is always remarkable.
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    Jul 08, 2014 7:03 PM GMT
    Found it. It's the Eastern Dobsonfly. Take a look at this specimen.

    eastern_dobsonfly_male_july_10_2008_a_03
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    Jul 08, 2014 7:04 PM GMT
    kevex saidDavidDolce's and Jmusmc85's son?
    You should be ashamed of yourself for insulting nature like that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 08, 2014 7:10 PM GMT
    More research. This was an adult male. They don't eat and only live a few days. The extensions from the mouth on the male are to hold onto the female. The female has a painful bite. The male does not bite. The larvae eat.
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    Jul 08, 2014 7:32 PM GMT
    More research: "Like mayflies and many other river-dwelling insects, dobsonflies are very sensitive to pollution. If you have dobsonflies in your local stream, be pleased! It’s a good sign."

    And, it's not a fly.

    http://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/not-a-fly-the-dobsonfly/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2014 7:20 PM GMT
    Holy crap. The Dobson fly is in the news this week as the world's largest flying aquatic insect.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/22/world/asia/giant-insect-china/index.html?hpt=hp_c3

    "According to the Insect Museum of West China, local villagers in the outskirts of Chengdu handed over 'weird insects that resemble giant dragonflies with long teeth' earlier this month.

    Several of these odd critters were examined by the museum and found to be unusually large specimens of the giant dobsonfly, which is native to China and Vietnam."

    140722030226-giant-bug-china-2-horizonta
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    Jul 23, 2014 3:24 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidFound it. It's the Eastern Dobsonfly. Take a look at this specimen.

    eastern_dobsonfly_male_july_10_2008_a_03


    OMG, I got goosebumps from that pic. icon_eek.gificon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 23, 2014 3:28 AM GMT
    Just deep fry it. I'm sure it will taste good. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Mohannned

    Posts: 280

    Jul 23, 2014 4:39 AM GMT
    xrichx saidJust deep fry it. I'm sure it will taste good. icon_biggrin.gif


    icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jul 23, 2014 5:03 AM GMT
    LOL, I'm trying to imagine the millions of years it took for nature to evolve mating rituals of this sort, and the accompanying physical features from poisonous bite to those long tusks. Nature is totally weird. You realize that 300 million years ago, some of these things were as big as a bi-plane!? They still would be if the reptiles hadn't learned to grow wings to eat the fuckers!
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    Jul 23, 2014 5:06 AM GMT
    MikeW saidLOL, I'm trying to imagine the millions of years it took for nature to evolve mating rituals of this sort, and the accompanying physical features from poisonous bite to those long tusks. Nature is totally weird. You realize that 300 million years ago, some of these things were as big as a bi-plane!? They still would be if the reptiles hadn't learned to grow wings to eat the fuckers!


    Well, I guess reptiles saved our lives.