NASA Detects Mystery Booming Sound In Deep Space, Origin Unknown

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    Jan 10, 2009 1:37 PM GMT
    Call Dr Arroway, because NASA has detected a deep space sound that defies belief or any explanation. They don't have a single clue about its origin, according to Alan Kogut from the Goddard Space Center:

    contact-space.jpg

    The universe really threw us a curve. Instead of the faint signal we hoped to find, here was this booming noise six times louder than anyone had predicted.

    According to NASA, "the source of this cosmic radio background remains a mystery". It's not primordial stars, it's not any known radio source, and in fact, the problem here is that there is "not enough radio galaxies to account for the signal". In other words, nothing in the known cosmos is capable of producing this deafening sound. University of Maryland at College Park's Dale Fixsen—part of NASA's ARCADE team— says, that to get this kind of signal, "you'd have to pack [radio galaxies] into the universe like sardines. There wouldn't be any space left between one galaxy and the next". So in more scientific terms: They don't have a flying frak about what the hell this may be.

    The sound has been detected by ARCADE, a balloon-borne probe which is chilled to 2.7 degrees above absolute zero. The instrument itself is inside a tank of 500 gallons of liquid helium to reach that temperature, which is the same temperature as the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    custom_1231588732343_299482main_instrume

    Needless to say, plugging into this completely unexpected and mysterious alien iPod playlist has made scientists at the Goddard Space Flight Center more excited than Jason Chen at the Las Vegas' Adult Entertainment Expo
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    Jan 10, 2009 1:42 PM GMT
    Sarah Palin knows all about it, because she can see space from her house.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 10, 2009 2:24 PM GMT
    God needs to lay off of the burritos.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 10, 2009 2:42 PM GMT
    "They're here, they're here... are we ready"????


    LOL
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 10, 2009 2:50 PM GMT
    galactus.gif
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    Jan 10, 2009 3:14 PM GMT
    What can I say? beammeup.gif







































    Muha...

    Muhaha....


    MUHAHAHAHAHAHAH!


    laugh.gif

    My fleet is coming!











    Seriously, though, I'm excited as to what this could lead to. Now imagine if the tables were turned. How would other sentient beings react to our own racket? icon_razz.gif In terms of signals, we aren't exactly a very quiet planet. Scary thing is, with SETI's failure and all that, we have yet to find a source of signal that could even be remotely sentient (this recent discovery doesn't exactly constitute as sentient, just mysterious). It makes you wonder now, doesn't it?

    Why we can't hear (or see or detect or whatever) any form of intelligence-created 'noise' from the surrounding worlds around us is kinda scary if you think of it...

    Either we're all alone and the chances of intelligent life evolving is slimmer than we thought... or there's something out there that ensures that the neighborhood remains quiet. The child, lost and screaming in the forest, attracts not only possible help, but... wolves.eek.gif

    Scary innit?
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    Jan 10, 2009 3:54 PM GMT
    Oh, it's just the near alignment of the earth and sun with the center of the galaxy in 2012. The black hole at the center of the galaxy's tummy is rumbling. Eat, drink and be merry, for on Dec 21, 2012, you shall surely die. icon_twisted.gif

    http://alignment2012.com/whatisGA.htm

    Oh, and Contact is one of my all-time faves, except this is one of the few films where Matthew McConnaughey was grossly mis-cast.

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    Jan 10, 2009 4:19 PM GMT
    I can't find this on any news site. Where'd you find it Ursa?
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    Jan 10, 2009 4:30 PM GMT
    Worthless Advice From Uncle Wilbur (Thank you, Jack and Jill)
    OK after several cups of coffee, a vitamin and waffles (with milk chaser) I've given this a considerable amount of thought this morning and here is my theory: It's a beating heartbeat 'cuz our natural "universe" is actually a much larger organism's body that we, the planets, galaxies, etc. inhabit! icon_surprised.gif

    Every so often, our galaxy happens to circulate near various organs & other inhabitants of this "universal" shared body so we get surprised by actions, fellow occupants, lights and sounds that seem new to us. icon_lol.gif

    As this shared "universe" or organism's body continues to grow (our expanding "universe") we and future, remnant generations will likely encounter more seemingly novel anomalies.icon_razz.gif

    END OF LINE.
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    Jan 10, 2009 4:35 PM GMT
    I can only hope it was the door hitting President Bush on his way out.
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    Jan 10, 2009 7:23 PM GMT
    I think its one of them Rock Stars.

    I've been told that they make lots of loud noises.
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    Jan 10, 2009 11:25 PM GMT
    home alone Pictures, Images and Photos

    Ay Santa Selena Mercedes Rosario Salazar!! That's El Diabloooooo!!
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    Jan 10, 2009 11:38 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidgalactus.gif
    Awesome. I'm sure his Herald will be here soon.
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    Jan 11, 2009 12:03 AM GMT
    Thirdbeach saidI think its one of them Rock Stars.

    I've been told that they make lots of loud noises.


    so dumb...couldn't help but chuckle.
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    Jan 11, 2009 12:20 AM GMT
    Oh, Christ on a cross on a popsicle stick! It's just a little gas! Get off my back! (unless we're having sex)
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    Jan 11, 2009 12:29 AM GMT
    McGay saidOh, Christ on a cross on a popsicle stick! It's just a little gas! Get off my back! (unless we're having sex)


    I wondered if it was McGay passing gas. That's a way better theory.
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    Jan 11, 2009 12:31 AM GMT
    It's cosmic gas. You should all be having existential thoughts shortly.
  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Jan 11, 2009 1:01 AM GMT
    bill007 saidWorthless Advice From Uncle Wilbur (Thank you, Jack and Jill)
    OK after several cups of coffee, a vitamin and waffles (with milk chaser) I've given this a considerable amount of thought this morning and here is my theory: It's a beating heartbeat 'cuz our natural "universe" is actually a much larger organism's body that we, the planets, galaxies, etc. inhabit! icon_surprised.gif

    Every so often, our galaxy happens to circulate near various organs & other inhabitants of this "universal" shared body so we get surprised by actions, fellow occupants, lights and sounds that seem new to us. icon_lol.gif

    As this shared "universe" or organism's body continues to grow (our expanding "universe") we and future, remnant generations will likely encounter more seemingly novel anomalies.icon_razz.gif

    END OF LINE.


    AKA the Horton Hears a Who Theory. Ha!
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    Jan 11, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    did it sound anything like this?
  • dannyboy1101

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    Jan 11, 2009 1:11 AM GMT
    Seriously, though, I'm excited as to what this could lead to. Now imagine if the tables were turned. How would other sentient beings react to our own racket? icon_razz.gif In terms of signals, we aren't exactly a very quiet planet. Scary thing is, with SETI's failure and all that, we have yet to find a source of signal that could even be remotely sentient (this recent discovery doesn't exactly constitute as sentient, just mysterious). It makes you wonder now, doesn't it?

    Why we can't hear (or see or detect or whatever) any form of intelligence-created 'noise' from the surrounding worlds around us is kinda scary if you think of it...

    Either we're all alone and the chances of intelligent life evolving is slimmer than we thought... or there's something out there that ensures that the neighborhood remains quiet. The child, lost and screaming in the forest, attracts not only possible help, but... wolves.eek.gif

    Scary innit?[/quote]


    I don't think we're alone, but think about it. Chances are any lifeform out there intelligent enough to cross the massive distance to us probably wouldn't want to hang out with such a dumb species. We may think we're smart, but it's just like with our bodies, someone always has slightly bigger biceps. Would you want to take 15 1st graders to a bar? Can't say that I'd have fun. Hence why maybe they just visit like we go to the zoo. Are the animals alive? Yes. Do we want to communicate with them and establish equality in the world, show them how to drive a car? Pfft.

    OR...

    Perhaps they're already here. Maybe some viruses are aliens. We always assume that extra-terrestrial life is going to look like us (5'11" two eyes, nose, mouth, two arms, two legs). Perhaps the Lilliputians live among us. Just a thought.
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    Jan 11, 2009 1:33 AM GMT
    I'd rather we didn't make alien contact. It's an assumption they would be friendly, and not want to have us as their lunch. A hi-tech evil civilization is as easy to postulate as a benign one. Nothing says they must be good, and not destroy us.

    I understand the probabilities that say intelligent life exists elsewhere in the vast universe. But I'm not so sure we should be in any hurry to meet them.
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    Jan 11, 2009 6:40 AM GMT
    ruck_us saidContact is one of my all-time faves, except this is one of the few films where Matthew McConnaughey was grossly mis-cast.


    The Film?! The Book is where it's at. icon_razz.gif

    dannyboy1101 said

    I don't think we're alone, but think about it. Chances are any lifeform out there intelligent enough to cross the massive distance to us probably wouldn't want to hang out with such a dumb species. We may think we're smart, but it's just like with our bodies, someone always has slightly bigger biceps. Would you want to take 15 1st graders to a bar? Can't say that I'd have fun. Hence why maybe they just visit like we go to the zoo. Are the animals alive? Yes. Do we want to communicate with them and establish equality in the world, show them how to drive a car? Pfft.

    OR...

    Perhaps they're already here. Maybe some viruses are aliens. We always assume that extra-terrestrial life is going to look like us (5'11" two eyes, nose, mouth, two arms, two legs). Perhaps the Lilliputians live among us.


    Yeah and that. icon_razz.gif Alien civilizations could be separated not only by space, but time as well. As in there might actually be no civilization currently with the same level of technology as we are. We are after all, pretty young. And the development of technology is fairly rapid, a blink of an eye really in comparison to the age of the universe.

    So yeah, we're probably really just infants and awesomely uninteresting to a race advanced enough.

    And yeah, there's always the chance that it is impossible for us to communicate with other alien lifeforms, given the totally separate paths of evolution that they could've taken. They could be rocks, really, for all we know. Sentient, slow-thinking, slow-moving rocks. Or tiny little buggers riding on spaceships the size of a pollen.

    It's unlikely that viruses are alien though, imo. Their method of storing 'information' is too similar to ours, as such they're more likely to be something that branched off very early in the evolution of life on earth. Then again, if the Panspermic theory has merit, they could very well be aliens and our bacterial ancestors could be from the Oort cloud. icon_razz.gif
  • drakutis

    Posts: 586

    Jan 11, 2009 6:44 AM GMT
    That was my TARDIS dematerializing!!! Sorry for the alarm! Nothing to see over here!
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Jan 11, 2009 6:51 AM GMT
    Plus, of course, there's the final term in the Drake equation, Sedative: L, the length of time that a civilization releases detectable signals. The more charitable explanation is that the civilization moves on to other forms of communications which aren't broadcast in ways detectable by us. The normal interpretation, though, is that the civilization comes to an end. The more technologically sophisticated we become, the easier it gets for a lone madman to destroy the planet.
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    Jan 11, 2009 6:51 AM GMT
    the aliens are at a rave