Is There Any Truth to Health Effects of Probiotic?

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    Jul 21, 2014 10:07 PM GMT
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    NYT: The label on my bottle of Nature’s Bounty Advanced Probiotic 10 says it contains 10 probiotic strains and 20 billion live cultures in each two-capsule dose. The supplement provides “advanced support for digestive and intestinal health” and “healthy immune function.”

    I have no way to know if any of this is true. Like all over-the-counter dietary supplements, probiotics undergo no premarket screening for safety, effectiveness or even truth in packaging. Can there really be 20 billion micro-organisms (“guaranteed at the time of manufacture”) in those dry capsules that will spring into action in my digestive tract?

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/21/probiotic-logic-vs-gut-feelings/
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    Jul 21, 2014 10:09 PM GMT
    For sure, they are healthy for the profits of the manufacturers.
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    Jul 21, 2014 11:27 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidIt does seem dubious to provide a guarantee of these billions of cultures in one capsule.

    I stick to cultured yogurt and notice an improvement in regularity and decreased flatulence. Everyone around definitely appreciates the decreased flatulence. icon_twisted.gif


    This. Keep it natural.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Jul 22, 2014 3:35 AM GMT
    I notice a vast difference between products. I don't attribute it to varying quality, just the right blend for an individual. my ex strongly preferred another one.

    I wish I liked cultured products because as the other guys said, natural is better. Dr Mercola promotes fermented vegetables as the ultimate probiotic.

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/29/sandor-katz-on-fermented-foods.aspx
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    Jul 22, 2014 4:32 AM GMT
    Yes there is good bacteria and Yes you can get it in a pill form. Is it some magic bullet to cure all life's problems, nope. Its often given to Pts that are on strong ABX( antibiotics) in the hospital treat infections. ABX can kill all bacteria, some bacteria is good and essential for proper digestion/ immunity so you got to replace it somehow. Sometimes in situations where bad bacteria( EX C-diff) have taken over to such a degree that we cant treat it with ABX, then as crazy as it sounds pts do often get " poop transplants"....... to reintroduce good beneficial GI bacteria into their bodies. icon_eek.gificon_smile.gif
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    Jul 22, 2014 5:24 AM GMT
    No. You can get more variety of "probiotic" bacteria just from eating leafy greens.The ones sold in fad pills and yogurt are unlikely to be the important ones.

    <---- Ph.D. Microbial Ecology


    (Yeah, poop transplants are a real thing. Came up in some previous threads where I was met with derision and personal insults. As usual. But still not the same as the fad monocultures.)
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    Jul 22, 2014 1:32 PM GMT
    There are several thousand species of microbes that live on your skin and inside your body (over 2000 species in the belly button alone). While some people may benefit from a supplement, there is no way a supplement can populate the microbial ecosystem that is supposed to live in your gut. Some guidelines say to eat foods that have lots of microbes growing in them, like yogurt, sour kraut, miso, etc. (http://www.mindbodygreen.com/1-9331-1/top-10-probiotic-foods-to-add-to-your-diet.html)

    Other research I've come across from Europe states that people with the lowest incidence of auto-immune disease (such as allergies) in Western countries are those who live around farm animals. The more types of farm animals the better. The belief is that breathing air that smells like farm animal manure diversifies the microbe population inside our bodies. During 10,000 years of animal husbandry we may have developed a symbiotic relationship with farm animals in this way. But as most people moved away from farming and regular farm animal contact, our immune systems have become dysfunctional for lack of microbial exposure.
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    Jul 22, 2014 2:14 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidFor sure, they are healthy for the profits of the manufacturers.


    PROBIOTICS FOR HIV PATIENTS

    What do people with HIV use this supplement for?

    To prevent and treat diarrhea due to gastrointestinal infections

    HIV-positive people are vulnerable to a number of gastrointestinal infections that can cause diarrhea. An HIV-positive person who experiences persistent diarrhea should visit their doctor. If an infection can be identified, a more effective treatment can be started. Sometimes, however, the type of infection can’t be identified. Nevertheless, some HIV-positive people have used probiotics with success to treat unexplained diarrhea. Others have combined probiotics with other treatments to successfully treat known infections.

    http://www.catie.ca/fact-sheets/vitamins-and-supplements/probiotics
  • ursa_minor

    Posts: 566

    Jul 22, 2014 4:43 PM GMT
    Interesting thought.

    I have access to a microscope in my lab, maybe I can have a look and compare yoghurt.
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    Jul 22, 2014 7:19 PM GMT
    I'm sure probiotics are good if you aren't eating enough beneficial foods but I personally just take it in food and drinks. Homemade yogurt, sauerkraut, kim chee, kombucha, water kefir, veggies and fruit smoothies, dark chocolate. Supposedly a dark chocolate piece makes your intestinal bacteria really happy.

    All about probiotics.
    http://www.growyouthful.com/remedy/probiotics-good-bacteria.php?utm_source=ezine&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter056
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    Jul 22, 2014 7:39 PM GMT
    I saw an article saying that our gut was smarter than our brain ( the bacteria brain cells outnumbered our central brain). Im starting to think that microbes are the dominate species on the planet.

    We need to take probiotics because our "city" water has chemicals in it to specifically kill bacteria, and so do drugs, high acid diets etc.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Jul 22, 2014 8:12 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidI saw an article saying that our gut was smarter than our brain ( the bacteria brain cells outnumbered our central brain). Im starting to think that microbes are the dominate species on the planet.

    We need to take probiotics because our "city" water has chemicals in it to specifically kill bacteria, and so do drugs, high acid diets etc.


    I`d heard the human body has ten times as many foreign microorganisms within it than our own cells! We are mostly not human!

    Microbes probably are the dominant form of life on Earth, if you measure it in terms of species numbers, biomass, or absolute numbers. I`d go as far as saying they are in the universe! They`re hardiest, reproduce fastest, and evolve and adapt fastest. They were the first forms of life here, and had the place to themselves for three billion years before multi-cellular life came along. They keep the place ticking over during Earth`s periodic crises/mass extinctions, etc. And they`ll last the longest into the far future.

    The vast majority live completely separate from us, for example, in oxygenless environments. The remaining species can be pathogenic, or salugenic(positively good for our health). These may be part of the post-antibiotic future as they actively combat the pathogens.

    From what I`ve read these probiotic supplements are mostly a waste of time for someone in good general health and eating a balanced/healthy diet.

    Some who have specific gastro-intestinal conditions, or who`ve had powerful doses of antibiotics after surgery, etc. may benefit from them. But generally the microbes down there are quite capable of looking after themselves(and us!)
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    Jul 22, 2014 10:46 PM GMT
    There are more commensal bacterial cells living on humans (digestive tract is "outside" as well from a physiological pov) than there are cells in a human but our cells are much larger so by mass we are mostly human.

    The question was about probiotics. The science is dodgy and no clear benefit has been shown. My view is that bacteria produce some essentials that we can get from eating fermented foods, animals (preferably fish or ruminants), or (to some extent) from bacteria living in our guts.
    I don't think probiotic supplements is a good idea. The ecosystem in your gut is in equilibria and it might be a bad idea to try and push the composition. Also people eat absolute... I want to say shit or crap but we are already using those words... The things people eat have enormous amounts of preservatives. Preservatives kill healthy bacterial species and let others take over (like sulphur-metabolising bacteria). And they are in everything and food producers don't have to put it on the label most times. Or stuff like EDTA becomes labelled as "antioxidant" when it is a potent bactericide (not to mention a major environmental pollutant). Finely textured beef is washed with antibacterial solutions but because that's "a treatment" rather than an additive it doesn't go on the label.

    Sorry about the rant. It's a sore spot with me.
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    Jul 23, 2014 6:26 AM GMT
    The best thing you can do to reduce the bad bacteria in your digestive tract is to cut out sugar from your diet as completely as possible.
    Sugar doesn't provide healthy nutrition to our bodies - but it does provide exactly the kind of food source that the bad bacteria in our gut needs to not only grow - but to overgrow and crowd out the healthy bacteria in our intestinal tracts.

    When you eat high-sugar foods you're feeding the parasitical bacteria in your belly instead of giving your body the nutrition it needs.
    Sugar acts to strengthen the parasites in your gut - which greatly weakens your immune system and causes chronic health complaints.

    If you eat a very low sugar and low carb diet you will slowly starve and kill the bad bacteria in your gut and restore a good balance to your intestinal tract.
    Plus, your gut will not only function better inside - it will look better on the outside too.

    Probiotics are essential, however - if you've recently taken a course of antibiotics.
    Antibiotics destroy the good bacteria in the digestive tract and you need to supplement with good bacteria (and avoid sugar) in order to prevent an overgrowth of bad bacteria.
  • PE_Mike

    Posts: 75

    Jul 23, 2014 7:22 PM GMT
    bullshit supplement industry is a profitable sideline for big pharma. wake up and smell the smoke ... its your dollar bills burning
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    Jul 23, 2014 9:22 PM GMT
    My friend is 5'8" and weighs roughly 450 lbs.
    That's Right, FOUR HUNDRED AND FIFTY POUNDS!

    Once I suggested that he take a probiotic supplement after his recent course of antibiotics.

    He said that he was hesitant to take any form of supplement

    "BECAUSE I'M CAREFUL WHAT I PUT INTO MY BODY."


    He has a deep suspicion of "health supplements" and thinks they are all just marketing scams.

    Too bad he doesn't have the same fear of Jelly Donuts...and every other treat he assaults his body with daily.
  • ai82

    Posts: 183

    Jul 24, 2014 3:48 AM GMT
    Science is rarely black and white. I say try it and see if it works for you. I eat yogurt regularly, but when my stomach hurts, I make sure to eat some, and usually I fell better. Maybe its the placebo effect, maybe its those microbes, I don't know.
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    Jul 25, 2014 11:15 PM GMT
    I use some Swiss probiotics which have to be kept in a fridge and they seem to work for me pretty well. They helped me to get through the last few months when I was eating antibiotics a lot.
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    Jul 26, 2014 11:31 PM GMT
    Yes it has... like yogurt and yakult, they increase good bacteria that control the bad bacteria in the gut. Lactubacillus is a good gut pet indeed.
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    Jul 29, 2014 11:51 PM GMT
    Probiotics May Reduce Blood Pressure

    NYT: Consuming probiotics has a small but significant effect in lowering blood pressure, a large review of studies has found.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/probiotics-may-reduce-blood-pressure/?ref=health
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    Jul 31, 2014 2:32 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    woodsmen saidProbiotics May Reduce Blood Pressure

    NYT: Consuming probiotics has a small but significant effect in lowering blood pressure, a large review of studies has found.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/probiotics-may-reduce-blood-pressure/?ref=health


    Woodsmen - are you aware that there are other outlets besides the NY Times? Why are all of your topic posts simply copy and paste jobs from the NY Times?



    The NY times suck too! lol