Exercise and Weight Loss

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    Jul 29, 2014 1:44 AM GMT
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    NYT: Q. Is weight loss truly greater (for the same time expended) when exercising at moderate (say, 60 percent of maximum capacity) versus more intense levels (85 percent of maximum capacity)?

    A. Actually, the reverse is true. Minute for minute, you will expend more energy and therefore burn more calories if you exercise intensely rather than moderately. In other words, running for 30 minutes uses more calories than walking for that same half hour.

    I suspect, though, that you refer to the widespread belief that you burn more fat when you exercise moderately compared with strenuously, which is true. During intense exercise, the body needs rapidly combustible calories from carbohydrates, but when you’re moving at a relatively unhurried pace, the energy demands are lower, and the body can turn to slower-burning fat for fuel. According to a 2009 study in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, exercising at an intensity of about 65 percent to 80 percent of your maximal heart rate, or a pulse rate of about 105 to 130 beats per minute, maximizes the amount of fat that you burn during a workout but requires less overall caloric expenditure per minute than tougher exercise.

    Intense exercise may also quell later appetite, unlike gentler exercise. In an interesting study from earlier this year, men who rode stationary bicycles intensely for 30 minutes consumed far fewer calories afterward than when they rode moderately for 30 minutes and had lower blood levels of the hormone ghrelin, which is known to stimulate appetite.

    Still, the keys to losing weight with exercise are common sense and restraint.

    “It all comes down to energy balance,” or calories in and calories out, said Edward Melanson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, who has conducted many studies of exercise and weight loss. Most of us will burn only 200 or 300 calories in a moderate 30-minute exercise session, he said, adding, “You replace that with one bottle of Gatorade.”

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/ask-well-exercise-and-weight-loss/?_php=true&_type=blogs&ref=health&_r=0
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    Jul 30, 2014 4:49 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidStill, the keys to losing weight with exercise are common sense and restraint.

    “It all comes down to energy balance,” or calories in and calories out, said Edward Melanson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, who has conducted many studies of exercise and weight loss. Most of us will burn only 200 or 300 calories in a moderate 30-minute exercise session, he said, adding, “You replace that with one bottle of Gatorade.”


    I agree with common sense and restraint. People ask how I lost weight and "diet and exercise" is still the (boring and obvious) answer icon_smile.gif

    HIIT is supposed to burn calories even after you stop but I'm still curious how many. After ~25 min of doing that on a bike it says I've burned maybe 300 calories and no, that doesn't sound like a lot. It does allow me to eat a bit more though and I still watch the total caloric intake like a hawk.

    *squawk*
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    Jul 30, 2014 10:04 PM GMT
    JackBoneTX said
    woodsmen saidStill, the keys to losing weight with exercise are common sense and restraint.

    “It all comes down to energy balance,” or calories in and calories out, said Edward Melanson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, who has conducted many studies of exercise and weight loss. Most of us will burn only 200 or 300 calories in a moderate 30-minute exercise session, he said, adding, “You replace that with one bottle of Gatorade.”


    I agree with common sense and restraint. People ask how I lost weight and "diet and exercise" is still the (boring and obvious) answer icon_smile.gif

    HIIT is supposed to burn calories even after you stop but I'm still curious how many. After ~25 min of doing that on a bike it says I've burned maybe 300 calories and no, that doesn't sound like a lot. It does allow me to eat a bit more though and I still watch the total caloric intake like a hawk.

    *squawk*



    "Common sense" is the result of cultural Programming. It is common sense that Low fat diets help one lose weight but in reality it's just the opposite. We have an obese population as proof.
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    Jul 30, 2014 11:44 PM GMT
    Alpha13 said"Common sense" is the result of cultural Programming. It is common sense that Low fat diets help one lose weight but in reality it's just the opposite. We have an obese population as proof.


    I would say my own thinking re: fats has changed quite a lot this year. And it's so easy because I already loved the good ones icon_smile.gif
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jul 31, 2014 5:11 AM GMT
    woodsmen said29askwell-tmagArticle.jpg

    NYT: Q. Is weight loss truly greater (for the same time expended) when exercising at moderate (say, 60 percent of maximum capacity) versus more intense levels (85 percent of maximum capacity)?

    A. Actually, the reverse is true. Minute for minute, you will expend more energy and therefore burn more calories if you exercise intensely rather than moderately. In other words, running for 30 minutes uses more calories than walking for that same half hour.

    I suspect, though, that you refer to the widespread belief that you burn more fat when you exercise moderately compared with strenuously, which is true. During intense exercise, the body needs rapidly combustible calories from carbohydrates, but when you’re moving at a relatively unhurried pace, the energy demands are lower, and the body can turn to slower-burning fat for fuel. According to a 2009 study in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, exercising at an intensity of about 65 percent to 80 percent of your maximal heart rate, or a pulse rate of about 105 to 130 beats per minute, maximizes the amount of fat that you burn during a workout but requires less overall caloric expenditure per minute than tougher exercise.

    Intense exercise may also quell later appetite, unlike gentler exercise. In an interesting study from earlier this year, men who rode stationary bicycles intensely for 30 minutes consumed far fewer calories afterward than when they rode moderately for 30 minutes and had lower blood levels of the hormone ghrelin, which is known to stimulate appetite.

    Still, the keys to losing weight with exercise are common sense and restraint.

    “It all comes down to energy balance,” or calories in and calories out, said Edward Melanson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, who has conducted many studies of exercise and weight loss. Most of us will burn only 200 or 300 calories in a moderate 30-minute exercise session, he said, adding, “You replace that with one bottle of Gatorade.”

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/ask-well-exercise-and-weight-loss/?_php=true&_type=blogs&ref=health&_r=0
    The guy in the gray looks like he's checkin out DAT ASS...
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    Aug 03, 2014 3:43 AM GMT
    woodsmen said
    Still, the keys to losing weight with exercise are common sense and restraint.

    "Common sense" is the result of cultural Programming. It is common sense that Low fat diets help one lose weight but in reality it's just the opposite. We have an obese population as proof.


    Totally agree.

    In a weight loss journey spanning a decade, I think I vigorously triggered every single protection mechanism a body has to prevent starving to death.

    Check out the book "Flat Belly diet for Men" by the editors of Prevention magazine. Another helpful book for me is the "wheat-belly diet".

    There is a minimum daily calorie and carb intake needed to get the most out of a gym session. Today, a breakfast of half a carton of egg-beaters and 3 slices of cheddar cheese, failed to fuel a vigorous training session.

    I needed carbs with my protein. Caffeine didn't do a damn thing...
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    Aug 03, 2014 3:55 AM GMT
    There is much irony in that photograph.

    That setup with the 10-speed bike will do nothing for weight loss. How the hell do you add resistance to that setup?

    For instance, you step on a cardio machine. Notice the calories per minute display. With light resistance, that display probably reads 5 cal per minute. Great if you're already popping veins and want to run a 7 minute mile. Waste of time if you want to lose weight.

    Crank up the resistance. There's a reason it will calculate more than 10 calories a minute. Treadmills are programmed to calculate a higher calorie burn on increased speed. But, it will reward a steep incline significantly more.

    I used to focus on running 5k in 45 minutes. I gave that up for a 5K at 75% of the incline of the machine in less than an hour. A key to improving my weight loss was regular barbell exercises, like deadlifts, squats, and other lower-body strength training.

    Leg strength. Key to cranking the resistance and getting me off yet another plateau.