Do you microwave your food?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 31, 2014 3:25 AM GMT
    I've heard a lot of people say no because it either makes food less nutritious (it's BS)or because it makes food saggy.

    Do you microwave your food? What types of food do you and do you not microwave?



    Oh, here are a few interesting links


    http://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/Microwave-cooking-and-nutrition.shtml

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7047080

    http://edition.cnn.com/2014/01/21/health/upwave-microwaving-food/
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    Aug 01, 2014 5:37 PM GMT
    Only sweet potatoes. I'm eating them for breakfast at the minute, as they're like my main carb source. I must admit I've often worried about microwaved food being stripped of valuable nutrients.
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    Aug 01, 2014 11:57 PM GMT
    I'd say 90% of my meals are cooked in the microwave. It makes cooking chicken quick and very easy and I find the results are better than oven cooking or grilling. I haven't suffered from malnutrition yet, so that is probably an urban myth.
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    Aug 07, 2014 2:28 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidI'd say 90% of my meals are cooked in the microwave. It makes cooking chicken quick and very easy and I find the results are better than oven cooking or grilling. I haven't suffered from malnutrition yet, so that is probably an urban myth.


    I like cooking stuffed chicken breasts in the microwave. It's fast and yummy. icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 07, 2014 11:41 AM GMT
    Don't even own a microwave. I like food oven roasted or grilled.
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    Aug 07, 2014 1:51 PM GMT
    Depends on the food, but for most meals we prepare at home up to half the items are done in the microwave and half using traditional cooking methods. For instance, we buy some vegetables frozen in single portion sealed plastic steamer bags. We just put them in the microwave for the 2 minutes or so recommended, and get really fresh-tasting corn, peas, Brussels sprouts, etc. Not soggy that way at all. Perfect amount for the 2 of us, no leftovers, no pots to clean, quick & easy.

    We also do baked potatoes in the microwave, and fresh corn on the cob (wrapped in plastic with butter inside). For my teapot I microwave water in a glass measuring cup I use just for that purpose. I have an accessory for cooking eggs, from soft to hard, that works really well. No need to watch the water and mind the time, you just enter it, and hard boiled eggs done this way (up to 4 at a time) are the easiest to peel I've ever done.

    Naturally we reheat some leftovers, but not all. Most Chinese food we like is usually good that way, but pizza I prefer in the countertop toaster/oven, to keep the crust crisp. The microwave is the only way to warm tea or coffee that's gone cold, right in the same cup.

    Also when my husband makes some soup in a very large stew pot, and it later goes into the refrigerator to serve us for upwards of a week, I'll ladle some into a soup bowl for perfect microwave reheating anytime I get hungry. He does a great chicken soup for when one of us catches a cold, or mostly in my case when I frequently dehydrate, and I swear it really is a magical cure.

    And so while my late parents were like the elderly couple that pellaz mentions, not even ever owning a microwave, this elderly RJ couple uses one every day for all kinds of tasks. We simply can't function without one.