Does Amputee With Prosthetic Have Unfair Advantage?

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    Jul 31, 2014 1:41 PM GMT
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    Markus Rehm of Germany set a world record in the long jump at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London.

    NYT: The debate over whether disabled athletes using prosthetic devices should compete alongside able-bodied athletes took an unusual turn this week when a German amputee long jumper qualified for next month’s European Athletics Championships in dramatic fashion, only to learn that his national federation would not place him on its roster because officials deemed his prosthetic leg advantageous.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/31/sports/long-jumper-markus-rehms-federation-deems-his-prosthetic-leg-unfair.html?ref=sports
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    Jul 31, 2014 4:15 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidThe debate over whether disabled athletes using prosthetic devices should compete alongside able-bodied athletes...


    Do able bodied athletes get to participate in the Paralympic Games?
  • FRE0

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    Jul 31, 2014 7:44 PM GMT
    Here's another way to look at it.

    Amputees have a number of disadvantages. If in some non-routine or unusual activity they have an advantage, perhaps that should be considered something to offset their disadvantages in other activities.

    In any case, one must respect amputees who have worked so hard to live a normal life, especially amputees who have overcome the self-consciousness that is almost inevitable and make no attempt to hide a prostheses.
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    Jul 31, 2014 9:40 PM GMT
    Well he is playing in games where such things are present and is not playing against other people with " 2 good legs" So I don't see it as any issue. icon_cool.gif
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    Jul 31, 2014 11:55 PM GMT
    No easy answer to this. An amputation is a huge disadvantage and requires a ton of rehab, but a blade can be reshaped and optimized without an physical exertion.; muscle has to be trained. Regardless of fact or fiction behind blades, it will be perceived that way by some (especially if an amputee wins) until definitively proven otherwise.

    I think it also opens up the question of what is the limit to "body modification", as it is perceived. Is a souped up wheelchair eligible? Can I have a surgery to replace my fatiguing calfs? It may sound ridiculous, but someone will ask it.

    I commend the athletes who overcome the adversity though. Curious to see what the future will determine for them.
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    Aug 02, 2014 1:25 AM GMT
    LMFAO @ "the debate."