Registered to bicycle 165 miles after all, begun training, raised $1000 in 2 days

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    Jul 31, 2014 3:29 PM GMT
    I've been holding off registering this year, my doctor didn't want me bicycling 165 miles down to Key West in November again. So - I switched doctors! LOL! Really!

    But even then I've been reluctant. Finally my husband twisted my arm. And since I just joined both of us into a new gym, I have the means to get in shape (I hope).

    For the last 2 days since registering I've been hitting the stationary bike hard. With it being humid 90s in Florida right now I'm not ready for outdoor road work yet, plus the streets here get more dangerous for bicyclists every day. Just 2 weeks ago there was a memorial bike ride for another guy killed by a hit & run car.

    As soon as my friends heard I'm riding again they began writing checks, I received & deposited $1000 in 2 days, with more pledged. It's not to me, of course, but to our HIV/AIDS charity in my name, and the team with which I chose to ride.

    If anyone here would also like to contribute to The SMART Ride please contact me directly and I'll provide the online contact info. I can't post it openly here because some guys will misuse my personal info.
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    Jul 31, 2014 4:05 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI've been holding off registering this year, my doctor didn't want me bicycling 165 miles down to Key West in November again. So - I switched doctors! LOL! Really!

    But even then I've been reluctant. Finally my husband twisted my arm. And since I just joined both of us with a new gym, I have the means to get in shape (I hope).

    For the last 2 days since registering I've been hitting the stationary bike hard. With it a humid 90s in Florida right now I'm not ready for outdoor road work yet, plus the streets here get more dangerous for bicyclists every day. Just 2 weeks ago there was a memorial bike ride for another guy killed by a hit & run car.

    As soon as my friends heard I'm riding again they began writing checks, I received & deposited $1000 in 2 days, with more pledged. It's not to me, of course, but to our HIV/AIDS charity in my name, and the team with which I chose to ride.

    If anyone here would also like to contribute to The SMART Ride please contact me directly and I'll provide the online contact info. I can't post it openly here because some guys will misuse my personal info.


    I think most of the guys who you think would misuse your personal information, already know it.

    What about cycling and having had prostate cancer? Can you really still do it?

    As I think I've told you, I was an avid cyclist in SoCal and rode 6,000 +/- miles per year or so. It was one of my favorite activities there. No point in trying to take your car to the beach because by the time you found a parking place you'd be back home again. I don't ride here as there's no room on our two lane road for two cars and a bike and you know who loses that battle.

    But good luck with your fund raising, and if you end up riding, enjoy the ride.
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    Jul 31, 2014 4:09 PM GMT
    S-T-U-D!
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    Jul 31, 2014 5:13 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    I think most of the guys who you think KNOW would misuse your personal information, already know it.

    What about cycling and having had prostate cancer? Can you really still do it?

    Not CAN I - I already have, 3 times! I pedaled to Key West and returned home 4 days before my prostate surgery in 2011. In fact, I had scheduled the preceeding 6 weeks of radiation therapy to end just before the ride, so I'd be free to do it, and then had the surgery immediately after I returned home. Cutting it close with a narrow window, because the doctors didn't want the interval between the last radiation therapy session and the surgery to exceed 2 weeks.

    I was riding my bicycle 3 days after I had the prostate surgery, and played golf the day after that. Even though the day before I rode I had a setback, with increased post-surgical bleeding & fainting. I just packed my briefs with more gauze.

    The surgery was done through the rectum, no external incision or stitches. For a couple of days afterwards I merely felt like I'd been ridden hard by a thick 10-incher, plus the pain of having a catheter with a strap-on bag until day 2.

    Then I did the ride again the next year, and last year. The prostate really has no impact on riding my bike, the saddle area is not physically tender or sore. The prostate's protected from direct pressure by the pubic arch of the pelvis. The challenge has been my reduced strength & stamina. That, and some questions about my heart are what concerned my former doctor, not my prostate.
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    Jul 31, 2014 10:49 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    freedomisntfree said
    I think most of the guys who you think KNOW would misuse your personal information, already know it.

    What about cycling and having had prostate cancer? Can you really still do it?

    Not CAN I - I already have, 3 times! I pedaled to Key West and returned home 4 days before my prostate surgery in 2011. In fact, I had scheduled the preceeding 6 weeks of radiation therapy to end just before the ride, so I'd be free to do it, and then had the surgery immediately after I returned home. Cutting it close with a narrow window, because the doctors didn't want the interval between the last radiation therapy session and the surgery to exceed 2 weeks.

    I was riding my bicycle 3 days after I had the prostate surgery, and played golf the day after that. Even though the day before I rode I had a setback, with increased post-surgical bleeding & fainting. I just packed my briefs with more gauze.

    The surgery was done through the rectum, no external incision or stitches. For a couple of days afterwards I merely felt like I'd been ridden hard by a thick 10-incher, and the pain of wearing a catheter & bag until day 2.

    Then I did the ride again the next year, and last year. The prostate really has no impact on riding my bike, the saddle area is not physically tender or sore. The prostate's protected from direct pressure by the pubic arch of the pelvis. The challenge has been my reduced strength & stamina. That, and some questions about my heart are what concerned my former doctor, not my prostate.



    Sorry for all the questions, but about half of guys our age end up with it. I still think skin cancer will get me first though.
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    Jul 31, 2014 10:51 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidS-T-U-D!


    +1
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    Aug 01, 2014 12:14 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    Sorry for all the questions, but about half of guys our age end up with it. I still think skin cancer will get me first though.

    Maybe a little closer to age 70 before around half of all US men will get prostate cancer, and that percentage increases with age. But still a big number, and makes me wonder why women's breast cancer gets all the attention and money, while men's cancer does not.

    But admittedly it's one of the easiest cancers to treat successfully, IF CAUGHT EARLY. The problem is when it goes untreated for too long and spreads, like happened to my late Father. You don't really die of prostate cancer itself, the gland is non-essential for life; you die of all the other fatal cancers in your body when it metastasizes.

    And in my Father's case the doctor's decided not to tell him he was terminal, and asked me to cooperate, which I did. So that when my turn came I was suspicious of my own doctor's favorable prognosis, especially given my Father's medical history and the deceit his doctors had perpetrated on him. And as a result I did go through a period of doubt and panic.

    But still looking good at 3 years, and so therefore registered for another Ride to Key West. And if I can't do it I'll switch to crew as the Ride starts, but will still raise money, and participate on the Ride for my 7th year. I've done crew before, and make a great cheerleader. icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 01, 2014 1:20 AM GMT
    BTW, look at what I drove today. Was looking on the net last night and found it. It said Columbus.

    It was cheap, but needed about $100-150k worth of restoration. Too hard to find anyone around here that knows how to do anything so I'll wait until I find a more 'done' car.

    photo 909766da-7361-41d7-9875-b6b0e561651a.jpg
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    Aug 01, 2014 2:34 PM GMT
    Damn, god bless! I'm proud of myself when I ride 20. PM me the info?
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    Aug 01, 2014 3:29 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree saidBTW, look at what I drove today. Was looking on the net last night and found it. It said Columbus.

    It was cheap, but needed about $100-150k worth of restoration. Too hard to find anyone around here that knows how to do anything so I'll wait until I find a more 'done' car.

    photo 909766da-7361-41d7-9875-b6b0e561651a.jpg

    What did you think of that squarish steering wheel, and that push-button transmission? Was "N" still the start button in 1962?
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    Aug 01, 2014 4:15 PM GMT
    ShiftyJK08 saidDamn, god bless! I'm proud of myself when I ride 20. PM me the info?

    I like to tell prospects that we're doing a series of 15 to 20-mile rides, thanks to our full pit stops. So it's 15/20 x 6 = 100 the first day (5 pit stops plus the 6th leg to our overnight stay), and 15/20 x 4 = 65 the second day (3 pit stops plus the final leg to Key West).

    The public web site is:

    http://thesmartride.org
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    Aug 02, 2014 11:20 AM GMT
    If I lived down there Id ride with you. I average about 50 miles a week anyways just riding around my area. I have a 24 speed full suspension mountain bike to which Is mostly ridden on pavement, so its in very good condition. I can do over 30 miles in a few hours if needed. We have a trail here in my area that is about 65 miles long called the Silver comet Trail which is a abandoned railroad that the state turned into a bike trail.
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    Aug 02, 2014 12:30 PM GMT
    davidingeorgia saidIf I lived down there Id ride with you. I average about 50 miles a week anyways just riding around my area. I have a 24 speed full suspension mountain bike to which Is mostly ridden on pavement, so its in very good condition. I can do over 30 miles in a few hours if needed. We have a trail here in my area that is about 65 miles long called the Silver comet Trail which is a abandoned railroad that the state turned into a bike trail.

    We have a bicycle delivery service. You go to a local bike shop there and have your bike disassembled and shipped to one of our participating shops in this area a few days ahead. They will transport it down to our starting point, just south of Miami. There they'll reassemble your bike, ready to ride when you arrive yourself by whatever means you choose.

    When you finish the ride in Key West you give your bike to one of our bike shop mobile repair vans that accompany the Ride, and they ship it back to your home dealer. This is common practice on rides like this throughout the country. And we have riders from all around the US and other countries. From nearby Georgia, though, a car with bike rack (or large SUV with the bike inside) might be the better way, with a friend along to get your car to KW from the starting point.

    Then you can stay a few extra days and enjoy a mini-vacation after the Ride, see KW, stay at a gay guest house, hit the Everglades park on the way back, stay a little in South Beach or gay Fort Lauderdale/Wilton Manors, the combinations are endless.

    As for your bicycle, a road bike is best. A mountain bike with suspension is heavier, and the large knobby tires cause a lot more rolling resistance. If you can do the kind of mileage you're riding on a mountain bike then 165 miles on a road bike will be a breeze, but a challenge on a mountain. See if you can borrow one.
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    Aug 02, 2014 2:08 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    freedomisntfree saidBTW, look at what I drove today. Was looking on the net last night and found it. It said Columbus.

    It was cheap, but needed about $100-150k worth of restoration. Too hard to find anyone around here that knows how to do anything so I'll wait until I find a more 'done' car.

    photo 909766da-7361-41d7-9875-b6b0e561651a.jpg

    What did you think of that squarish steering wheel, and that push-button transmission? Was "N" still the start button in 1962?


    I love these cars but this was a 50 footer. Yes you started in neutral and if it's still on fast idle and you put in gear or on a hill still in neutral you gotta be a little careful releasing the parking brake or you'll be rolling away. I prefer having a park praw in the tranny.

    This one was all over the road so you had to get adjusted to that rectangular steering wheel. This one felt like an ocean going vessel... a cruise ship. It can be fixed, but I want one that's already fixed.
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    Aug 02, 2014 2:22 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    I love these cars but this was a 50 footer. Yes you started in neutral and if it's still on fast idle you gotta be a little careful releasing the parking brake or you'll be rolling away. I prefer having a park praw in the tranny.

    This one was all over the road so you had to get adjusted to that rectangular steering wheel. This one felt like an ocean going vessel... a cruise ship. It can be fixed, but I want one that's already fixed.

    The parking brake was a separate drum and brake shoe set on the transmission tailshaft. It did succeed in locking both rear wheels with one brake, without the complication of dealing with the double leading rear shoes in Chrysler's signature brakes, with 2 separate slave cylinders.

    Problem was if the rear transmission seal began to leak. Then fluid could get on the parking brake drum, rendering it ineffective. These cars were notorious for not holding with the parking brake. The last version of the pushbutton TorqueFlite did have a parking pawl, activated with a lever next to the pushbutton cluster.

    Yeah, a huge car. How my Mother managed it I'll never know. I first drove it coming back home from a family trip to Cape Cod in 1966, all 4 of us in that behemoth. My Father thought the Connecticut Turnpike would be a safe place to hone my skills. It became a disaster, as I've posted here before.