Relocating after Graduation

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 31, 2014 5:05 PM GMT
    Hi all,

    So I am finishing up school this coming may and strongly considering relocating right after graduation (permitting I have my career job). The things I would like to know is the gay scene in the following city, cost of living (although I have a good sense of what it is for most), quality of people.

    I am a Chicago boy born and raised, however that is my last choice. It goes, in no particular order: Dallas, San Francisco, Boston, Miami, London (Maybe) and Chicago.

    Any and all advice is appreciated. If there is something else I should consider, let me know.

    Thank you
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 31, 2014 5:24 PM GMT
    Cost of living of locales on your list:
    London - highest
    San Francisco - 2nd highest
    Apartments in San Francisco can be $2,000 - $3,000 for a studio and $3,000 - $4,000 for a 1-bedroom. Lots of gay men and gaylife in SF and surrounding suburbs, ethnically diverse.
  • Amira

    Posts: 327

    Aug 01, 2014 1:26 PM GMT
    I lived in Miami last year for some time..

    Not sure what your career is going to be, but if you are bilingual it will make your life easier. It's not mandatory but if you can speak Spanish then great.

    The quality of people... Well I found them to be quite rude.

    I also didn't care for the scene in Miami. It is mostly clubbing. But Miami isn't far from Fort Lauderdale which is more relaxed for going out and can walk to different bars off of Wilton Drive. Then again I didn't really go out in Miami much.

    Cost of living really depends on what part you want to live in.. it is pretty expensive of course, it is a city but it does has nice affordable areas such as South Miami/Kendall.

    Good luck!
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    Aug 01, 2014 2:59 PM GMT
    muscjckguy saidHi all,

    So I am finishing up school this coming may and strongly considering relocating right after graduation (permitting I have my career job). The things I would like to know is the gay scene in the following city, cost of living (although I have a good sense of what it is for most), quality of people.

    I am a Chicago boy born and raised, however that is my last choice. It goes, in no particular order: Dallas, San Francisco, Boston, Miami, London (Maybe) and Chicago.

    Any and all advice is appreciated. If there is something else I should consider, let me know.

    Thank you


    You can't beat Chicago for a place to live, if you have a job . You will have money then to Visit the other places .
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    Aug 01, 2014 6:49 PM GMT
    Do you have a job line up? Most grads compete with people and face fierce competition. Some even move home for a while... Go where they hire you. I like London and San Francisco. But it's very tough for a new grad with no job to move to. Stay in Chicago where you are, it seems more practical.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 02, 2014 12:49 AM GMT
    if you are looking for a vibrant gay community, you might consider a "second-tier" big city (in terms of population). a lot of times a slightly smaller city has a stronger gay "community" (versus simply a lot of gays, unless that's what you want). For example, Madison WI is known to have a very vibrant gay community despite being a smaller "big city." Same with Seattle, Portland, etc.... a little surprised Dallas is on the list, I don't know anyone from/in Dallas who enjoys it.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14342

    Aug 02, 2014 1:12 AM GMT
    muscjckguy saidHi all,

    So I am finishing up school this coming may and strongly considering relocating right after graduation (permitting I have my career job). The things I would like to know is the gay scene in the following city, cost of living (although I have a good sense of what it is for most), quality of people.

    I am a Chicago boy born and raised, however that is my last choice. It goes, in no particular order: Dallas, San Francisco, Boston, Miami, London (Maybe) and Chicago.

    Any and all advice is appreciated. If there is something else I should consider, let me know.

    Thank you
    Drop Dallas completely. Stay out of Texas, avoid the lone star shithole entirely. In addition to checking out San Francisco, Boston, Miami, and London UK may I suggest the following cities for you:
    1. San Diego
    2. Atlanta
    3. Seattle
    4. Denver
    5. Minneapolis
    6. Columbus, OH
    7. Philadelphia

    Check these cities out, I am sure that they will have a lot to offer you in terms of employment and quality of life. But avoid Texas like the plague, it is the most homophobic, xenophobic, and backward state in the US. Dallas along with Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin are not all what they are falsely cracked up to be. Trust me on this one, I lived in Texas for ten years and it sucked.
  • mgk90

    Posts: 66

    Aug 02, 2014 3:17 AM GMT
    I would say Minneapolis is an awesome place to move but the winters are SOOOOOO brutal icon_redface.gif

    However, it is really gay friendly and there is absolutely no place in the entire metro area where I have felt uncomfortable being openly gay..
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14342

    Aug 02, 2014 12:30 PM GMT
    mgk90 saidI would say Minneapolis is an awesome place to move but the winters are SOOOOOO brutal icon_redface.gif

    However, it is really gay friendly and there is absolutely no place in the entire metro area where I have felt uncomfortable being openly gay..
    Winter is only what you make of it. After awhile you get tired of summer just like you would get tired of winter. We need to promote our wonderful northern cities and quit harping on the weather aspect. Our four season climate is perfect. Minneapolis is one of the seven cities that I suggested to the OP. He should also check out Milwaukee, that is another great city with a lot to offer. Hopefully he will seriously heed my warning by staying away from Texas and not to believe all the propaganda about Dallas or anyplace else in that backward, unfriendly, flat wasteland of a state.
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Aug 02, 2014 8:05 PM GMT
    I don't think anyone can realistically answer your question without knowing your interests/hobbies, and career goals.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Aug 03, 2014 2:56 AM GMT
    WhoDey saidI don't think anyone can realistically answer your question without knowing your interests/hobbies, and career goals.


    I agree. It really depends on your career goals which nobody knows. For instance, if you are into technology, the Bay Area or Boston may be your best picks but places along the "Silicon Prairie" may also be good. Philadelphia is good for health care, NYC for finance, and Miami for tourism and something pertaining to retirees, etc.
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    Aug 03, 2014 3:16 AM GMT
    I like the phrase "in-bred." I'm in the electronics tech industry. So, my options are limited.

    Seattle is a great place to live if you can afford it. Pressure on rents from the tech industry will be daunting. 7 months of no sunlight depressing. Sitting in traffic if you live in the vibrant downtown/capital hill area but your tech job is outside that area, frustrating. But, hey. There's no state tax and a decent mass transit system being impacted by loss of funding. Food is expensive, driven in part by the push to set the minimum wage at $15 an hour. Housing is expensive. Utilities are expensive. But, I digress.

    My impression of 14 years living in San Diego is even darker. If you don't sweat money or live out of the gym, you will find it a sunnier, expensive and lonely existence.

    One place I think should be on your list but I've never actually visited: Portland, OR.

    Thanks for the heads-up on Denver.
    Thinking of Boston next year.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2014 9:38 PM GMT
    I would stack my locations for jobs post graduation based of work availability.

    Some other things to think about:
    -While those locations are nice do you know how competitive the market is in those cites?

    -Are you able to afford the cost of living in one of those location?

    I currently accepted a job in my field in a city I left the Air Force in. While this is no where near my idea living situation, I can very comfortably here until things open up in the future and save my money.

    IMO I would have a job first and worry about locations later down the line, when you have the flexibility to move freely.
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    Aug 04, 2014 4:23 PM GMT
    Hi all,

    Thanks for the responses and advice.

    My Career path is a combination of Finance and Commercial Real Estate, so REIT analysis, Valuation, Retail Brokerage, Underwriting, or Transactions... Now the cities I choses are all either stable, in the sense of the Real Estate market, or growing.

    I go to Marquette, that is in Milwaukee... And the city does offer alot, but also its growth is erratic. Chicago, is home and others in my circle have said you can't go wrong with being home, which is something I have strongly considered. The comment about Dallas is funny because I thought it was more of a welcoming city and what not, but then again, I have not visited any of the city on my list except Miami, when I was 19....(Doesn't really count).

    Being a Chicago native, weather isn't really an issue, however, I am over winter season. Now don't get me wrong, I enjoy the winter sometimes, I just would like a change of scenery.

    Thank you for all the advice and different perspectives about the cities. I will definitely do more research on Denver and pay some visits to other cities.
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    Aug 04, 2014 5:20 PM GMT
    RobertF64 saidI like the phrase "in-bred." I'm in the electronics tech industry. So, my options are limited.

    Seattle is a great place to live if you can afford it. Pressure on rents from the tech industry will be daunting. 7 months of no sunlight depressing. Sitting in traffic if you live in the vibrant downtown/capital hill area but your tech job is outside that area, frustrating. But, hey. There's no state tax and a decent mass transit system being impacted by loss of funding. Food is expensive, driven in part by the push to set the minimum wage at $15 an hour. Housing is expensive. Utilities are expensive. But, I digress.

    My impression of 14 years living in San Diego is even darker. If you don't sweat money or live out of the gym, you will find it a sunnier, expensive and lonely existence.

    One place I think should be on your list but I've never actually visited: Portland, OR.

    Thanks for the heads-up on Denver.
    Thinking of Boston next year.


    I really enjoyed Portland but if the rain is a factor in Seattle I think Portland's weather is pretty similar.

    Columbus did have a fun "scene" centered around the Short North that was more than just bars when I worked there on and off in the 90s.

    What about Charlotte? Lots of banking for your career, decent weather.... I don't know how the LGBT community is there, though.
  • blueandgold

    Posts: 396

    Aug 05, 2014 6:13 AM GMT
    Ive found both Boston and Chicago to be wonderful cities. Chicago is pretty affordable for a city of its caliber.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Aug 05, 2014 7:27 AM GMT
    muscjckguy said

    I am a Chicago boy born and raised, however that is my last choice. It goes, in no particular order: Dallas, San Francisco, Boston, Miami, London (Maybe) and Chicago.


    London is in a foreign country (you're American), and unless you have EEA citizenship, you'll need a work visa to work there. If you have some sort of skill that's in high demand and there's a shortage of in Europe, then go for it. You'll have to find an employer there first, and if they can't find a European to fill that job, then they'll help you with the paperwork to live there. You may also experience a little bit of culture shock in the UK. Not nearly as much as you would in, say, Pakistan. But nonetheless, there would be a little cultural adjustment. The winters will not be as brutal as in the northern US (Boston, Chicago, New York, Minneapolis, etc). On the other hand, British summers can be pretty depressing. Forgive me if you've already been there. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 07, 2014 4:01 AM GMT
    muscjckguy saidHi all,

    Thanks for the responses and advice.

    My Career path is a combination of Finance and Commercial Real Estate, so REIT analysis, Valuation, Retail Brokerage, Underwriting, or Transactions... Now the cities I choses are all either stable, in the sense of the Real Estate market, or growing.

    I go to Marquette, that is in Milwaukee... And the city does offer alot, but also its growth is erratic. Chicago, is home and others in my circle have said you can't go wrong with being home, which is something I have strongly considered. The comment about Dallas is funny because I thought it was more of a welcoming city and what not, but then again, I have not visited any of the city on my list except Miami, when I was 19....(Doesn't really count).

    Being a Chicago native, weather isn't really an issue, however, I am over winter season. Now don't get me wrong, I enjoy the winter sometimes, I just would like a change of scenery.

    Thank you for all the advice and different perspectives about the cities. I will definitely do more research on Denver and pay some visits to other cities.


    Have you considered Charlotte? It has a huge financial and banking industry, the weather is nice(r)the gay community is present and you're not too far from Atlanta (gay capital of the east coast). The cost of living is good and the economy is doing well.