Lower calorie fried foods with airfryers? Really?

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    Aug 02, 2014 5:27 PM GMT
    I avoid fried foods and other than having sauteed and deep fried I know nothing about the nuances of frying. But then I read a "Men's Journal" article on tempting $300+ countertop devices called airfryers, of which the Philips brand was rated the best:

    http://www.usa.philips.com/c-m-ho/cooking

    Airfryer ads and articles claim you use 70% less fat and/or 80% less oil (just a tablespoon which gets recirculated by hot air (convection oven style?) to fry whatever food is in there). But doesn't the same amount of oil with the same amount of calories wind up on the food you injest even though you use less? Meaning you can get a similar result by just blotting deep fried food with a paper towel? For this reason I also avoid precut oven baked sweet potato fries since they're also lightly coated with oil.

    No airfryer ad, article or review I've read makes the direct claim that the fried food is lower fat or lower calorie, only that you use less oil making it.

    I tried comparing the calories of airfried food to conventionally fried but comparisons on calorie counting websites are difficult given the use of different serving sizes:

    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calories/generic-fresh-french-fries-made-by-airfryer-93516254

    Seems like a scam to me. Thoughts?
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    Aug 02, 2014 5:37 PM GMT
    Yeah, it seems like a fancy mini convection oven. I think the difference here is that in traditional deep frying, the food is submerged in oil and might absorb some of it.

    If this thing was cheaper, I'd consider getting one just to make fries and other potato based foods.. french fries, home fries, etc.
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    Aug 02, 2014 6:17 PM GMT
    I agree with both of you.

    On the other hand, I have a regular deep fryer, made by Presto, and one disadvantage with it is that there's a lot of oil to store between uses. Ideally the oil should be refrigerated so that it doesn't go rancid. Because of that I haven't used it again since the first few times when I bought it. And my GI tract can't handle too much greasy food.
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    Aug 02, 2014 6:18 PM GMT
    Although I can make deep fried Twinkies with mine. icon_twisted.gif
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    Aug 02, 2014 6:22 PM GMT
    For a counter top convection oven the Breville gets high marks. I wonder if you could accomplish the same thing as this air fryer by spraying food with oil before putting it in this oven.

    http://tinyurl.com/klgw9v9
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    Aug 02, 2014 9:40 PM GMT
    ^
    That's what I was thinking. If the difference between an "airfryer" and deep frying is truly the amount of oil that's absorbed into the food, why spend $300 on an "airfryer" when you can just spray, say, olive oil lightly on the food before putting it in the oven? Especially when I already have a convection oven that circulates air?

    And even in the case of deep frying you can always blot the food with a paper towel before serving.
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    Aug 03, 2014 6:10 PM GMT
    Plus, as in your example, you can use olive oil. In a regular deep fryer you can't use olive oil. I don't know if the airfryer has the same restrictions on the oil you can use (oils with a high smoking point).