Have you ran a marathon undertrained?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 12, 2009 5:13 AM GMT
    I shall be joining a 10K race this coming Friday, January 16th. It'll be my first time and I hardly trained for it. I'm not competing to win, I'm just curious as to how far I can push myself. Not a big deal if I don't reach the finish line, either. Has anyone of you experienced the same... by choice?
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    Jan 12, 2009 5:23 AM GMT
    Do a slow shuffle, 10k is nothing, just 6.2 miles. That's the length of the AIDS walks I do, with my cane, and I finish ahead of about 75% of the participants. And I never train at all.

    You'll do fine, just don't be seduced to compete with the jackrabbits up front. And at your age I presume you have no health issues that require a doctor's clearance. Good luck!
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    Jan 12, 2009 5:34 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidDo a slow shuffle, 10k is nothing


    ...just like what the sponsor says: "Impossible is Nothing." LOL

    Thanks!
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jan 12, 2009 2:31 PM GMT
    Yes, but probably the shorter 5 k or 7K Quarter Marathon. You get to start somewhere. But I was walking half way thru. If I am returning back to marathoning I will be in this condition. It been a long time since I my last marathon , a 10k , I think last year.
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    Jan 12, 2009 2:43 PM GMT
    For terminology sake, a marathon is 26.2 miles. So you really can't have a 10k marathon. You can have a great 10k race though!

    I did a half marathon this past summer (13.1 miles) and was just marginally properly trained (I should have started training earlier). That same race, my friend, who never ran a race in his life, completed a 5k with little problem and I think could have done a 10k too.

    One helpful thing to have when you do this is a heart rate monitor. I find that if I keep my heart rate in a certain zone (about 160 for me), I can run for a long time. Once it starts creeping up over 170, I tire really fast. So if I just keep slowing down a little as the race goes on to keep my heart rate in check, I can finish. Granted, at the end of my first half marathon, I really lost control, had a heart rate above 180 and was dying the last 1/2 mile (thats where my lack of proper training was really showing). The key is to figure out what that max heart rate is for you and run to it.

    As long as you are in decent shape and not looking to set any speed records, I think most guys on RJ could probably do a 5k and likely 10k. After that, some level of training is probably needed if you don't want to drop down into a walk or stop (never stop -- it's really, really hard to recover after that).

  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Jan 12, 2009 3:10 PM GMT
    Due to a knee injury I had to stop training for my first half marathon, so I ended up running it without having trained the prior 4 or 5 weeks. You'll do fine. The advice above is good - go slow, try to watch your heart rate. I'll add make sure you watch your diet this week - focus on whole grains and veggies and limit your fat intake (that includes McDonalds icon_wink.gif ). Also, no alcohol (unless that means you'll go through withdrawal symptoms during the race... Hahaha).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 12, 2009 3:51 PM GMT
    A 10k is NOT a marathon..it's a 10k.

    As far as not training, its up to you....if you've never run six miles, it might surprise you in its difficulty....if you're in fairly good cardio shape, it shouldn't be a problem.

    Every year, I get a kick out of watching all the men vomitting after running the Turkey Trot, which is only an 8 miler....you can see who has trained and who hasn't....its fairly obvious...just watch where you step.icon_eek.gif
  • treader

    Posts: 238

    Jan 12, 2009 4:41 PM GMT
    Two more additional pieces of advice, try and do a short run (~3 miles) today (Monday) and on a Wednesday. Just go at a comfortable pace. Do NOT push yourself. Do some light cross training on Tuesday if you want. Rest on Thursday - no activity. Try and get plenty of sleep this week. Eat some pasta. Don't try and cram for a race. It won't work.

    On the day of the race, go to the back of the line-up. The people in front near the start-line have trained and will be going faster. You don't want to be anywhere near them. Since you haven't trained, do yourself and everyone else running a favor - get in back. You'll be more relaxed. You won't be tempted to run faster. If you feel uncomfortable, stop and walk for a little bit then start running again.

    Next time, train for a race. You'll enjoy it more. Good luck.
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Jan 12, 2009 4:46 PM GMT
    You should be ok if you employ a walk/run method: simply walk thru each of the water/aid stations instead continuing to run.
    It's not necessarily the distance that gets you but more maintaining a pace you can hold.
    Don't pay any attention to what others are doing. Be prepared to walk much of the distance or even drop out if you get sick or are in pain. Swallowing your pride is better than going to the hospital.
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    Jan 12, 2009 5:01 PM GMT
    treader saidTwo more additional pieces of advice, try and do a short run (~3 miles) today (Monday) and on a Wednesday. Just go at a comfortable pace. Do NOT push yourself. Do some light cross training on Tuesday if you want. Rest on Thursday - no activity. Try and get plenty of sleep this week. Eat some pasta. Don't try and cram for a race. It won't work.

    On the day of the race, go to the back of the line-up. The people in front near the start-line have trained and will be going faster. You don't want to be anywhere near them. Since you haven't trained, do yourself and everyone else running a favor - get in back. You'll be more relaxed. You won't be tempted to run faster. If you feel uncomfortable, stop and walk for a little bit then start running again.

    Next time, train for a race. You'll enjoy it more. Good luck.


    Treader's advice is right on the money. If you discover that you enjoy running races, start a training program that gradually builds up endurance and speed. Incorporate some cross training such as weightlifting, too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 12, 2009 5:09 PM GMT
    Real Jock has several great running/training programs....be sure to check them out....they can all be customized to fit your needs....I refer people to this site all the time for all the informative articles they have on training.
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    Jan 12, 2009 7:23 PM GMT
    Run slow, you can't start slow enough, especially if you aren't in good aerobic condition. Jog walk intervals may help you get to the finish line. If you feel good after 4-4.5 miles you can pick it up. Do NOT make the mistake of starting at the front of the crowd, and going out fast like you're in a 100 m sprint like so many do.

    Do a warm up walk of 10 minutes followed by a solid stretching regimen. Do the same after the race. You may even want to look up ice baths because you'll probably be pretty sore. If you push your body at something it's not conditioned to do, you're going to have to pay for it.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Jan 12, 2009 7:31 PM GMT
    I highly recommend the Run/Walk method of training. Run two minutes, walk 30 seconds... you need to find the right combo for you.

    Jeff Galloway has written some books on it that talk about how to develop a program that works for you.

    http://www.amazon.com/Galloways-Book-Running-2-Ed/dp/0936070277/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231788565&sr=1-3
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    Jan 13, 2009 4:45 AM GMT
    smalltownboy saidA 10k is NOT a marathon..it's a 10k.


    WHAT!?!!? A 10K is NOT a marathon?!? Then what’s the point of bragging about 'marathon training'?! LOL j/k

    Lemme just say, you guys rule! Thanks so much for taking the time to reply. Yes, common sense indeed tells me to be on cue far behind the trained people at the starting line. I was just telling treader that I’ve just finalized my personal adrenaline booster tracks on my iPod shuffle and I feel so pumped up already. I shall keep you posted of what shall take place after the race…

    OH.AND.ONE.MORE.THING.

    Should I shave my legs?

  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jan 13, 2009 12:38 PM GMT
    If 10k is not a marathon , I suppose you cant call 5k a marathon. Over in my country 5k is call jogathon and a shorter 3k "Fun Run". Marathon is either full marathon for 42k, half marathon for 21k and 7k for the quarter.
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    Jan 14, 2009 4:05 AM GMT
    "Quarter Marathon" sounds like a bad consolation.
    Yes, "3K Fun Run" is quite a common term (which I personally equate to a "Happy Meal" aka "for kids!" *lulz* ).
    Anyone in the mood for Mikey Dees? icon_razz.gif
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jan 14, 2009 1:09 PM GMT
    Fugitive,

    Bad consolation or not. Most of marathon here is a quarter. Lately we start having a lo of half . A full marathon is only available in a few big city and not many people participate in it. Most of my marathon are 10k (if you consider it a marathon) and a quarter at 7k. I have done a few charity 5k run , the last one is for asthma charity run and some other good course charity that I believe in. They are great , you get you marathon addiction taking care off and helping people in the same time.
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    Jan 15, 2009 10:39 AM GMT
    Okay, this is it... I'm running my 10K in less than 24 hours so wish me *uck o/
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    Jan 15, 2009 11:51 AM GMT
    QUESTION

    How many of you have run a marathon?

    My trainer, who I respect a lot, told me flat out she would never train me for a marathon. She said putting your body through that constant motion--whether you are in shape or not--is unhealthy and dangerous.

    Afterall, the first person recorded to have run 26.2 miles died at the end.

    She did however say she would train me for a triatholon though... since you are doing different exercises and working different muscles unlike a marathon.

    "Marathons are dangerous no matter how much you train."


    What do you guys think?
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jan 15, 2009 12:50 PM GMT
    Ever heard of James Fixx. The founder of jogging who die while running. He heart artery was block and he die. But you could die (probably faster}. sitting on your ass watching TV while munching on fried chicken too.

    Theres risk in every sport . I heard people die while boxing, swimming, car racing, skiing. That part of life.
  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Jan 15, 2009 8:36 PM GMT
    FBfugitive saidOkay, this is it... I'm running my 10K in less than 24 hours so wish me *uck o/
    .

    Good *uck.

    I hope you come











































    in first place.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 3:06 PM GMT
    cjcscuba1984 saidQUESTION

    How many of you have run a marathon?

    My trainer, who I respect a lot, told me flat out she would never train me for a marathon. She said putting your body through that constant motion--whether you are in shape or not--is unhealthy and dangerous.

    Afterall, the first person recorded to have run 26.2 miles died at the end.

    She did however say she would train me for a triatholon though... since you are doing different exercises and working different muscles unlike a marathon.

    "Marathons are dangerous no matter how much you train."


    What do you guys think?


    I think she's full of shit.

    I run 4 a year....and I've run (so far) a total of I think 32. I'm running the Houston Marathon on Sunday. Another in February. Since November, I've run San Antonio & Dallas.

    I'm still alive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 18, 2009 7:44 AM GMT
    Meh. It was 10 degrees and raining.icon_confused.gif
    I thought I made it in less than an hour, as my friend timed me at 56m:11sicon_redface.gif
    The official results online are out:

    person
    name FBfugitive*
    run number 6239
    team
    age class 30

    total
    place (Male/Female) 1582
    place age class 340
    time total (net) 01:07:44
    time total (gross) 01:10:46

    *not my real name, of courseicon_razz.gif
    **not bad for someone untrained and on a Micky Dees Diet (aka McDonald's)icon_biggrin.gif

    THANK YOU GUYS and hopefully I can join the real marathon next year!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:22 AM GMT
    Congratulations FB!
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:49 AM GMT
    cjcscuba1984 saidHow many of you have run a marathon?

    I do at least 1 marathon a year and 3+ half's a year along with 1-2 tris. Grant it that is nothing compared to 4 marathons that Smalltownboy does, but just like him, I am still alive.

    Marathons aren't healthy, but if you train, you will be fine.

    Luxembourg half is end of May, we should all go.