Do you "love" your country?

  • jaroslav123

    Posts: 600

    Aug 14, 2014 7:36 PM GMT
    If so, why?
    And if not, why?
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    Aug 14, 2014 7:56 PM GMT
    I'm more of a local person. I love my region and my city especially but I don't particularly love my country.

    I feel my country and the ruling political class doesn't really represent me so I don't feel a part of the UK.

    I don't like the fact we live in a meritocracy (apparently) yet we still have a monarchy. I especially hate that to be selected by a political party in the uk its still an advantage to be a public school boy. I hate that I live in a country whereby the poorest in society are blamed for everything and the rich get away with tax avoidance schemes and don't pay into society whilst profiting out of being part of society.

    UK kind of sucks!
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Aug 14, 2014 8:40 PM GMT
    yes ,its the only place in the world who is mine, when my people were in exile,they sufferd a lot becouse there was no israel.
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    Aug 14, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    Yes, but I'm unhappy about a lot of the political decisions that are made.
  • james_1099

    Posts: 15

    Aug 14, 2014 8:55 PM GMT
    I don't know. Born and raised America. I think a lot of the people here have their heads too far in the bible's ass and try to make laws in compliance with the big book of fantasy. That's my only gripe. The rest of the developed world is far ahead of us in sciences, math, healthcare...you name it. We're kind of behind. I have hope for this generation though.
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    Aug 14, 2014 9:07 PM GMT
    I think it's a decent place to live in America. The culture is really diverse, I like the local Pacific Northwest culture. It's nowhere near perfect, as far as corporate influence, economic inequality, and the like are concerned. But it's fine. People smile a little too much though, it's slightly vapid.
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    Aug 14, 2014 9:07 PM GMT
    No. My country is the world.
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    Aug 14, 2014 9:43 PM GMT
    I volunteer worked for one of Bucky Fuller's organizations way back in my college days in part because I immediately related to reading his idea of being a citizen of the world and not just of one border.

    I do have a sincere appreciation for the many good things this country has done. I think I have never missed participating in voting a single election since I came of age, I've never cheated on my taxes, throughout my life I've done volunteer work in both private and civic levels. But I do have some animosity for a country that would deny me my human rights. While watching everyone else enjoy their lives so much more fully, legally, I've been forced to live as a second class citizen for nearly 60 years. I don't know that I could ever forgive this world that, not even with its unending apology.

    This country, this world owes us and it can't start paying back fast enough.

    So it's always been a bitter sweet affair. And it isn't fair. That others get to enjoy all her benefits including a dignity celebrated for them in so many ways but always stolen from us.

    220px-World_citizen_badge.svg.png
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    Aug 14, 2014 9:49 PM GMT
    pazzy saidas a born and raised american, i do know that my country doesn't love me because i'm black and gay.
    At least I still love you for your body. Too bad about the black and gay thing, though. Have you tried praying the black and gay away? icon_razz.gif
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    Aug 14, 2014 10:48 PM GMT
    I was born and grew up in the UK.

    I love my country for its natural beauty, e.g. the Lake District, the Jurassic Coast and its historic heritage such as the city of Chester, Bath Spa, and London.

    I also appreciate the freedom of speech, and I can even joke about the Monarchy without the threat of arrest. Furthermore, free enterprise is good - the freedom to start up a business, like I did in 1980, and run it with minimum State interference. There are also no religious strongholds as in Islamic countries, and I'm free to practice or not to practice my religion without ending up in Court.

    But what I dislike about this country is its obsession with social class, the stiff upper lip, greater respect going to the better educated, a Government which favours the rich, gross adoration of the Queen, and the worship of the celebrity. One of the latest biggest stinks wafting from our Prime Minister's office is cronyism - the awarding of peerages for a large donation to the Conservative Party, itself made up from ex-public schoolboys such as from Eton, Westminster, Harrow, Winchester etc, along with members of the old Bullington Club of Oxford University.

    What I have found about this appalling culture is that a large percentage of the English population adores the Tory ministers who makes up our Government.
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    Aug 14, 2014 10:49 PM GMT
    In concept I love my country (USA). I do not particularly like the politics (only two political parties without much differentiation to matter much) and it's foreign policies.

    The only other country I would live in is one in which I was dictator for life. LOL

    My first action as dictator for life would be to solidify my position by setting up a two party system. One party would be the Fems and the other the Straight-Acting. There would be sooooooo much squabbling between them no one would think to depose me.
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    Aug 14, 2014 10:53 PM GMT
    No because its government is too corrupt and has lost its legitimacy in my eyes.
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    Aug 14, 2014 10:58 PM GMT
    220px-World_citizen_badge.svg.png
    too

    besides, since technically I have 3 citizenships, and I "love" 'em all, you'd consider me practicing polygamy
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    Aug 14, 2014 11:58 PM GMT
    I love my country but I don't particularly like the road we are going down right now. Home is what you make of it and I wouldn't want to live anywhere else. I especially love my state where our motto is "Live free or die." I live close to the mountains and all the activities I love.
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    Aug 15, 2014 12:06 AM GMT
    Pretty indifferent to be honest, although there are way (way way way) worse places to live than the United States.
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    Aug 15, 2014 12:07 AM GMT
    I spent most my life in the United States, but recently became a (dual) citizen of Australia. I still feel like there are many things about America which have made it great (industriousness, the peacekeeping aspect of our military, the innovation, our ideas about rights and freedoms (when not used as a weapon against minorities) but, socioeconomically, I think the US has a lot to learn. The minimum wage here is $19/hr hour, four weeks of vacation leave is nearly universal in most jobs and healthcare(Medicare) is available to anyone who needs it. These things have a HUGE impact on the quality of life for everyday Australians, and there is a sense of "mateship" between Aussies you don't see much anymore with individualistic Americans. I definitely feel like I have the best of both worlds, but no matter where I go, I always miss something. ;)
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    Aug 15, 2014 12:40 AM GMT
    I love Canada. We have a lot going for us. There are some negatives (cronyism in politics, Stephen Harper being the PM, and Alison Redford wasting public dollars), but overall I wouldn't want to live anywhere else.
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    Aug 15, 2014 2:53 AM GMT
    I'll take the unpopular view and confess that I'm definitely a patriot. Maybe it's that I'm from a pretty patriotic family, or maybe it's that I live in DC. But I am very proud of our heritage and culture, even with all its faults. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 15, 2014 3:11 AM GMT
    Saguaromatic saidI'll take the unpopular view and confess that I'm definitely a patriot. Maybe it's that I'm from a pretty patriotic family, or maybe it's that I live in DC. But I am very proud of our heritage and culture, even with all its faults. icon_biggrin.gif


    It's one goddamn fucking sad state of affairs when you have to say it's "the unpopular view."

    That's what the bullying tactics of the white Liberal Left have done to you and many others.

    My answer is Yes. No fucking qualifiers needed (except for white Liberals: "SUCK MY BALLS"), and no cloying pansy-ass tearful wishes for "social justice" (which is a false, pernicious, and corrosive notion in any case).

    Come to think of it, I'll change my answer:

    FUCK

    FUCKING

    TO

    THE

    FUCKING

    YES



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    Aug 15, 2014 4:01 AM GMT
    I love the whole world.
  • Nayro

    Posts: 1825

    Aug 15, 2014 4:03 AM GMT
    Yes I do! There is always room for improvement obviously but I am proud to live in one of the most progressive countries in the world and for a small country we are doing pretty good! icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 15, 2014 6:52 AM GMT
    Honestly No!, Latin America has a lot of problems, one of them is that people are so lazy, they don't want to study, everything is party and drinking beer all day. So, that's why any country that belongs to this region is considered developed.
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    Aug 15, 2014 8:30 AM GMT
    I like the places, I really appreciate the liberty we have, I love the language, I like the culture, I like some people, I absolutely adore the food.
    But I don't like the government, I don't like the politics, I don't like some people, I don't like some behaviours that most most people have.
    In the end, I don't know if I love France, but I kind of like being part of it.
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    Aug 15, 2014 3:49 PM GMT
    Jack_NNJ said

    My answer is Yes. No fucking qualifiers needed (except for white Liberals: "SUCK MY BALLS"), and no cloying pansy-ass tearful wishes for "social justice" (which is a false, pernicious, and corrosive notion in any case).


    Lol. How many groups have been maligned here in the past century, alone...
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    Aug 15, 2014 4:26 PM GMT
    kalikomua saidI spent most my life in the United States, but recently became a (dual) citizen of Australia. I still feel like there are many things about America which have made it great (industriousness, the peacekeeping aspect of our military, the innovation, our ideas about rights and freedoms (when not used as a weapon against minorities) but, socioeconomically, I think the US has a lot to learn. The minimum wage here is $19/hr hour, four weeks of vacation leave is nearly universal in most jobs and healthcare(Medicare) is available to anyone who needs it. These things have a HUGE impact on the quality of life for everyday Australians, and there is a sense of "mateship" between Aussies you don't see much anymore with individualistic Americans. I definitely feel like I have the best of both worlds, but no matter where I go, I always miss something. ;)


    I am Australian , and have shared my life between my home country and the U.S ( i have dual citizenship ),for the last 24 years .
    I totally concur with your views about both countries , i couldn't have presented those 2 better !