Inflammatory bowel disease and bottoming do not mix.

  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Aug 15, 2014 3:36 AM GMT
    So, a little over half a year ago, I ended up having sex with a guy that I had been seeing for awhile. It was safe sex, but I was the bottom. About a week later, I started to get these really odd bowel cramps, joint pains, and fatigue. I was alternating constipated - diarrhea, and the joint pains would seem to jump from my knees, to my wrists, to my lower back, repeat. At first, I was panicking hardcore because I thought I had caught some kind of STD. I've had blood tests run three times in the last six months, and everything is still turning up negative.

    But guess what? Turns out I have ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease. When I mentioned to my doctor that my father and great uncle have Crohn's disease (another form of IBD), it was suggested that I get a colonoscopy just to see if I had inherited similar problems, as there is strong evidence to support a genetic factor in developing IBD. From what I've learned, any kind of local damage to the rectum, colon, or large intestine can induce what is known as a "flare" - an indefinite period of more troublesome symptoms like the joint inflammation and bowel problems. Since I checked the "has had male sexual partners" box on my diagnostics sheet, my doc mentioned that flares are very commonly activated by friction and/or even minor tearing caused by anal sex. Flares can even come on randomly, or as a result of stress, or bad diet. Honestly I don't know for certain if the sex caused this flare, but the timing was just too convenient so it's a possibility.

    The colonoscopy (NOT FUN) turned up minor ulceration, so it seems as though I am at the end of my first flare. This first flare lasted only two months, and wasn't as severe as my doctor said it could have been, considering many people are knocked flat on their ass and are wholly incapacitated by flares at times.

    My doctor thinks I may also have a weird spine problem called ankylosing spondylitis too, which is sometimes co-morbid with UC. I need to go in for x-rays soon to check for this. Essentially it's excessive inflammation of the sacroiliac joint which is concurrent with UC flares, and can cause the sacroiliac joints to fuse, causing rigidity of the lower back even in young age. This makes sense, because I literally cannot do a single sit-up, even with a good core, and I occasionally have dull lower back pain. I used to think nothing of this and chalked it up to poor sitting posture. While UC is chronic and lasts for a lifetime, AS eventually fades in people who exercise and eat right.

    Looking back, I've had very mild symptoms before now (odd problems with bowel movements and random nausea) but have always written them off as something that everyone deals with now and again. Guess it just goes to show - if you ignore a leak, the dam must break eventually! UC is unfortunately a chronic condition that will last my entire lifetime, but hopefully I can avoid the worst of it with good lifestyle habits and perhaps some corticosteroids if my flares get really bad. Guess this is the end of my bottoming days though.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 15, 2014 3:53 AM GMT
    Looks like you're doomed to topville forever. icon_razz.gif

    The disease must really suck, though. Keep on top (no pun) of your research and look for the latest stuff on it.
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    Aug 15, 2014 4:07 AM GMT
    I don't want to sound like one of those fad pushers…. but since it involves your digestive track why not try going gluton free and see if it helps. Im in no way trying to diminish your ailment, but it could be worth a try. All the best…
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Aug 15, 2014 11:42 AM GMT
    A gluten free diet is only recommended for people with coeliac disease. It is related to (and often confused for) IBD in that it is an autoimmune disorder, and it affects the lower end of the digestive tract, but it is only triggered by exposure to gluten proteins. With IBD, parts of the intestines and colon are nearly always inflamed. There is honestly little to no evidence that gluten in moderate amounts is harmful to anyone who does not have CD or a gluten intolerance.

    Gluten is not a problem for me, although I have also developed an egg intolerance / allergy over the last year or so, because I always have gut cramps and nausea for at least a few hours after eating eggs. Thankfully I do not have all the insane food allergies that certain people with Crohn's have.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 15, 2014 9:46 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidLooks like you're doomed to topville forever. icon_razz.gif

    The disease must really suck, though. Keep on top (no pun) of your research and look for the latest stuff on it.


    Too bad really... you look like you'd be an amazing bottom. icon_razz.gif