Adding Weird Symbols Like "@" to Password? Useless

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    Aug 16, 2014 3:43 PM GMT
    NYT: Some people are arguing that security problems on the web go way beyond whether you put that extra number in your password.

    http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/15/that-in-your-password-for-better-security-useless/?ref=opinion
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    Aug 16, 2014 4:47 PM GMT
    -almost all web sites have their own cryteria want to see your password greater than 5 characters but less than 10. No upper case or numeric ok but no special characters. Often there is no provision to change your log in id

    -you must use a random generated password. You cant go wrong using the largest most complicated password you can. Always use a separate password for each and every of your accounts.


    EVERYONE SHOULD USE A PASSWORD MANAGER; 1Password. Its an app that runs on your laptop, tablet, cell phone.
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    Aug 16, 2014 4:53 PM GMT
    The @ symbol and others come in handy if you use them properly.

    For instance, p@Ul#1E*3$ would be much more secure than p@ulf1eXes.
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    Aug 17, 2014 3:17 PM GMT
    pellaz said-almost all web sites have their own cryteria want to see your password greater than 5 characters but less than 10. No upper case or numeric ok but no special characters. Often there is no provision to change your log in id

    -you must use a random generated password. You cant go wrong using the largest most complicated password you can. Always use a separate password for each and every of your accounts.


    EVERYONE SHOULD USE A PASSWORD MANAGER; 1Password. Its an app that runs on your laptop, tablet, cell phone.


    This so much!!! I work in a Customer Support center for a payment software and it drives me bonkers how many people complain about having to keep track of their passwords.

    Although we cannot recommend specific product I usually tell my caller to keep all their user names, passwords, and URLS in a spreadsheet to keep track of them.
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    Aug 17, 2014 3:56 PM GMT
    1Password; or similar type of product:
    -i feel more confidant on the encryption level on this product even tho it uses dropBox to sync your devices.
    -it does an automatic backup
    -functions as an electronic wallet; i can keep encrypted notes about how accounts are setup. Auto VIN#'s, etc those facts about life you would like to see on your iPhone. If your phone gets lost you can feel confidant no one is going to get access to the data.
    -it is automated so a new entry or change on one device appears on all your devices


    the down side here is the application is expensive. than again web id's & passwords are not going away any time soon and necessary if you cherish a well organized life.

  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Aug 17, 2014 11:17 PM GMT
    Typical structure of my password:
    #Th@t$#!mm3R6?y#
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    Aug 17, 2014 11:42 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    woodsmen saidNYT: Some people are arguing that security problems on the web go way beyond whether you put that extra number in your password.

    http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/15/that-in-your-password-for-better-security-useless/?ref=opinion


    Yes, once again, another copy and paste job from The New York Times. How's the subscription numbers trending these days over there Mr. New York Times sales representative Woodsmen?


    True. He really should learn to copy and paste from Faux News like you.
  • scienceguy

    Posts: 4

    Aug 18, 2014 12:16 AM GMT
    http://xkcd.com/936/
  • doriangrey77

    Posts: 22

    Aug 18, 2014 4:42 AM GMT
    Yes, once again, another copy and paste job from The New York Times. How's the subscription numbers trending these days over there Mr. New York Times sales representative Woodsmen?[/quote]

    I'm afraid I don't understand the problem.

    If someone regularly reads a favourite publication, it would be natural for him to frequently quote articles from it that interest him, and which he thinks might also interest the rest of us, no?

    I'd prefer to know the source of someone's information / topic rather than have to assume they either made it up, got it from National Enquirer, or plagiarized it from Oxford University Press, to give examples of three really different kinds of sources.
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    Aug 19, 2014 11:14 AM GMT
    pellaz said1Password; or similar type of product:
    -i feel more confidant on the encryption level on this product even tho it uses dropBox to sync your devices.
    -it does an automatic backup
    -functions as an electronic wallet; i can keep encrypted notes about how accounts are setup. Auto VIN#'s, etc those facts about life you would like to see on your iPhone. If your phone gets lost you can feel confidant no one is going to get access to the data.
    -it is automated so a new entry or change on one device appears on all your devices


    the down side here is the application is expensive. than again web id's & passwords are not going away any time soon and necessary if you cherish a well organized life.



    1Password is a wonderful product. I've been using it for years, and there are versions for all the different operating systems. It is very simple to use, too, and makes dealing with passwords a no-issue matter.