Fracking Boom Continues To Drive Gas Prices Downward; Update: America's Oil Boom Overwhelms Global Production Decline

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    Aug 30, 2014 2:12 AM GMT
    What's remarkable is that this boom is solely on private land. Now imagine the effect if the Obama Administration was actually supportive of fracking.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/26/fracking-boom-continues-to-drive-gas-prices-downward/

    Despite conflicts in the Middle East, U.S. drivers are seeing gasoline prices plummet thanks to huge increases in domestic crude oil production from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

    Booming U.S. crude oil production has helped put downward pressure on prices, which have been reflected at the pump. Bloomberg recently reported that the average price for gasoline dropped 4.21 cents over two weeks to about $3.48 a gallon on Aug. 22.

    According to the Energy Information Administration, gas prices hit about $3.45 on Monday and the average price is nearly 10 cents lower than the same time last year. On the East Coast, prices are more than 15 cents lower than last year and Gulf Coast drivers have seen a more than 14 cent reduction since last year.
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    Aug 30, 2014 4:23 PM GMT
    The problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.
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    Aug 30, 2014 7:33 PM GMT
    I am NOT for or against FRACKING.....I simply Googled to find the ingredients reportedly in the fracking fluids...along with some additional information on the FRACKING......

    Understanding-Fracturing-Fluid_0.jpg




    This is an interesting video....there is some shit in this and big money is of course playing a big role....icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 30, 2014 9:59 PM GMT
    Gas prices I believe have been a contributing factor to fucking up our entire economy. I personally feel our economy right now SUCKS compared to a few years ago. I was reading a thread on another forum written in 2004, and they were complaining about the price of gas in California versus all other states:


    03-05-2004:

    I live in California and over the past few weeks I've seen gasoline prices go to the highest they've been in my lifetime. What I have a hard time accepting is that we have the most expensive gas prices in the nation. No one is even close. Fuck Bush!


    State Regular Mid Premium Diesel
    California $2.18 $2.32 $2.36 $2.05
    Hawaii $2.10 $2.22 $2.26 $2.22
    Nevada $2.06 $2.17 $2.25 $1.90
    Arizona $1.91 $2.00 $2.11 $1.90
    New York $1.83 $1.96 $2.00 $1.86
    Oregon $1.82 $1.92 $1.95 $1.82
    Washington $1.80 $1.86 $1.95 $1.88
    Alaska $1.78 $1.89 $1.99 $1.69
    Connecticut $1.77 $1.92 $1.97 $1.83
    Rhode Island $1.75 $1.86 $1.92 $1.81
    Wisconsin $1.75 $1.81 $1.90 $1.70
    Idaho $1.74 $1.83 $1.88 $1.74
    Maine $1.74 $1.87 $1.93 $1.80
    Illinois $1.73 $1.86 $1.92 $1.74
    Utah $1.73 $1.82 $1.90 $1.68
    West Virginia $1.73 $1.81 $1.90 $1.74
    Florida $1.72 $1.86 $1.89 $1.74
    Massachusetts $1.71 $1.83 $1.90 $1.78
    Michigan $1.71 $1.81 $1.89 $1.66
    North Dakota $1.71 $1.77 $1.84 $1.65
    Vermont $1.71 $1.84 $1.92 $1.86
    District of Columbia $1.70 $1.81 $1.87 $1.83
    Pennsylvania $1.70 $1.79 $1.87 $1.76
    South Dakota $1.70 $1.81 $1.88 $1.63
    Indiana $1.69 $1.81 $1.86 $1.63
    Nebraska $1.69 $1.73 $1.78 $1.63
    Maryland $1.68 $1.78 $1.83 $1.73
    Minnesota $1.68 $1.75 $1.80 $1.62
    New Hampshire $1.68 $1.82 $1.88 $1.76
    Ohio $1.68 $1.80 $1.87 $1.69
    Delaware $1.67 $1.77 $1.85 $1.74
    Kansas $1.67 $1.71 $1.78 $1.64
    Iowa $1.65 $1.74 $1.82 $1.62
    Montana $1.65 $1.72 $1.80 $1.73
    Kentucky $1.64 $1.75 $1.83 $1.58
    North Carolina $1.63 $1.73 $1.81 $1.64
    Colorado $1.62 $1.74 $1.81 $1.66
    Mississippi $1.62 $1.71 $1.79 $1.57
    New Mexico $1.62 $1.73 $1.80 $1.64
    Alabama $1.61 $1.72 $1.78 $1.61
    Arkansas $1.61 $1.70 $1.81 $1.61
    Louisiana $1.61 $1.72 $1.80 $1.60
    Missouri $1.61 $1.67 $1.77 $1.54
    New Jersey $1.61 $1.73 $1.79 $1.63
    Tennessee $1.61 $1.71 $1.79 $1.60
    Virginia $1.60 $1.68 $1.75 $1.61
    Texas $1.59 $1.68 $1.74 $1.58
    Wyoming $1.59 $1.66 $1.77 $1.60
    Georgia $1.57 $1.69 $1.76 $1.56
    Oklahoma $1.57 $1.63 $1.72 $1.50
    South Carolina $1.57 $1.67 $1.75 $1.57


    Who wouldn't kill to have those prices back? How the hell can jump up over 100% in price? People aren't getting paid much extra. The thing is, even though it may only amount to an extra $15-20 per fillup...over a period of 3-4 years, you don't notice that things have gone to hell...it happens over a long period of time. Back then, I would stop and fill up at any random gas station and not think twice about it. Nowadays you have to be extra picky because not only are gas prices stupid, but premium (which my car uses) is not 10/15 cents more...it's like fucking 50 cents more. Stupid.

    I've watched city after city, where the once disposable income people had, is no more. They need to do something about this. They can frack whatever the fuck they want...just bring to under $2 again!
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    Aug 30, 2014 10:04 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    FuzzyPecs27 saidGas prices I believe have been a contributing factor to fucking up our entire economy. I personally feel our economy right now SUCKS compared to a few years ago.


    It's Bush's fault.


    Sorry for being a bit naive to politics...I should probably know the answer, but what's the short summary again of why it's Bush's fault? Seems like gas was cheaper back then LOL. Or does it have something to do with the war and diminishing dollar?
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    Aug 30, 2014 10:36 PM GMT
    Wyndahoi saidThe problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.


    I don't think there is significant concern anymore about the fracking fluids. I think the bigger concerns are the amount of water usage + improper sealing around the wells forcing methane into ground water/wells - and both issues have been largely mitigated in recent years with better technology (some wells even use very little water - and current technology actually uses the same as other forms of conventional oil extraction) and improved monitoring.

    I do think it's difficult to both be for "the environment" and civilization but be against fracking though only because of how much cleaner natural gas burns relative to other fuels (especially since we will need some transitional fuel towards something like economically viable fusion/solar).
  • Nakedman1969

    Posts: 247

    Aug 31, 2014 12:43 AM GMT
    Gas prices here are not lower we are still paying $3.56 are prices are not com7ng down for nothing.
  • captproton

    Posts: 316

    Aug 31, 2014 2:59 AM GMT
    Here in Idaho we are paying the ninth-highest gas prices in the nation. We're paying $3.83 a gallon for regular unleaded. And the oil supplying the refineries in Utah doesn't come from overseas. It comes from the oil fields of North Dakota and Canada.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Aug 31, 2014 5:15 AM GMT
    riddler78 saidWhat's remarkable is that this boom is solely on private land. Now imagine the effect if the Obama Administration was actually supportive of fracking.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/26/fracking-boom-continues-to-drive-gas-prices-downward/

    Despite conflicts in the Middle East, U.S. drivers are seeing gasoline prices plummet thanks to huge increases in domestic crude oil production from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

    Booming U.S. crude oil production has helped put downward pressure on prices, which have been reflected at the pump. Bloomberg recently reported that the average price for gasoline dropped 4.21 cents over two weeks to about $3.48 a gallon on Aug. 22.

    According to the Energy Information Administration, gas prices hit about $3.45 on Monday and the average price is nearly 10 cents lower than the same time last year. On the East Coast, prices are more than 15 cents lower than last year and Gulf Coast drivers have seen a more than 14 cent reduction since last year.


    The Obama administration SHOULD be against fracking. There is a lot of evidence that tracking is bad for the environment. We should be putting our resources into developing better solar and wind power.
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    Aug 31, 2014 6:42 AM GMT
    waccamatt said
    riddler78 saidWhat's remarkable is that this boom is solely on private land. Now imagine the effect if the Obama Administration was actually supportive of fracking.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/26/fracking-boom-continues-to-drive-gas-prices-downward/

    Despite conflicts in the Middle East, U.S. drivers are seeing gasoline prices plummet thanks to huge increases in domestic crude oil production from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

    Booming U.S. crude oil production has helped put downward pressure on prices, which have been reflected at the pump. Bloomberg recently reported that the average price for gasoline dropped 4.21 cents over two weeks to about $3.48 a gallon on Aug. 22.

    According to the Energy Information Administration, gas prices hit about $3.45 on Monday and the average price is nearly 10 cents lower than the same time last year. On the East Coast, prices are more than 15 cents lower than last year and Gulf Coast drivers have seen a more than 14 cent reduction since last year.


    The Obama administration SHOULD be against fracking. There is a lot of evidence that tracking is bad for the environment. We should be putting our resources into developing better solar and wind power.


    Yes because fairy dust and unicorn shit will keep civilization going. icon_rolleyes.gif Do please educate yourself as to what the current alternatives are and how bad they are for the environment given that a transition to solar can't happen overnight - or likely the next few decades.
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    Aug 31, 2014 8:18 AM GMT
    To the OP w/o reading the following posts: The Obama administration and the Western govs plus the Marcellus shale states govs bought into fracking. Don't forget about the N.Dakota oil rush issues either. Apparently a policy to make ourselves more energy self sufficient to foreign gas and oil imports pushed us to trade energy independence in exchange for good ground water and air quality (WTF?). I did wind power (bad too) and am fully ware of the other issues. Not a good trade off at all. My $.02

    P.S. Your BLM lands are heavily "leased" to wind power and mining.
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    Aug 31, 2014 8:23 AM GMT
    Darwin1122 saidSolar and wind, solar and wind, I'm so sick of hearing this wishful thinking crap. Why don't we just fill our tanks up with farts and rainbows while we're at it. Natural gas is much cleaner burning than oil or coal and while there's a lot of hype surrounding fracking there isn't any good evidence that it is dangerous to the environment. "Gas Land" is full of misinformation. Oh and it also happens to be abundant and domestic which means its good for the economy and helps keep us out of oil wars. Frack that shit.


    Ditto... my best guess is that people who actually believe that we should shut off oil and gas immediately don't manage their own finances or believe there are infinite amounts of other people's money to spend...

    Not to mention the fact that gas burns so much cleaner than the alternatives.
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    Aug 31, 2014 1:58 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi saidThe problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.


    I don't think there is significant concern anymore about the fracking fluids. I think the bigger concerns are the amount of water usage + improper sealing around the wells forcing methane into ground water/wells - and both issues have been largely mitigated in recent years with better technology (some wells even use very little water - and current technology actually uses the same as other forms of conventional oil extraction) and improved monitoring.

    I do think it's difficult to both be for "the environment" and civilization but be against fracking though only because of how much cleaner natural gas burns relative to other fuels (especially since we will need some transitional fuel towards something like economically viable fusion/solar).


    You must know things no one else knows because the companies doing the fracking continue to refuse to divulge what chemicals they are using.
    I am not (necessarily) anti new technology, i am pro transparency.
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    Aug 31, 2014 3:07 PM GMT
    Wyndahoi said
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi saidThe problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.


    I don't think there is significant concern anymore about the fracking fluids. I think the bigger concerns are the amount of water usage + improper sealing around the wells forcing methane into ground water/wells - and both issues have been largely mitigated in recent years with better technology (some wells even use very little water - and current technology actually uses the same as other forms of conventional oil extraction) and improved monitoring.

    I do think it's difficult to both be for "the environment" and civilization but be against fracking though only because of how much cleaner natural gas burns relative to other fuels (especially since we will need some transitional fuel towards something like economically viable fusion/solar).


    You must know things no one else knows because the companies doing the fracking continue to refuse to divulge what chemicals they are using.
    I am not (necessarily) anti new technology, i am pro transparency.


    A number of companies do actually disclose (e.g. Range Resources is explicit in the additives they use). In addition, other companies use any varying combination - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_additives_for_hydraulic_fracturing

    Where there is limited disclosure is the combination and amounts because companies want to hide it from each other given that the combination gives varying levels of optimized outputs for the specific geography.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Aug 31, 2014 7:04 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    waccamatt said
    riddler78 saidWhat's remarkable is that this boom is solely on private land. Now imagine the effect if the Obama Administration was actually supportive of fracking.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/26/fracking-boom-continues-to-drive-gas-prices-downward/

    Despite conflicts in the Middle East, U.S. drivers are seeing gasoline prices plummet thanks to huge increases in domestic crude oil production from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

    Booming U.S. crude oil production has helped put downward pressure on prices, which have been reflected at the pump. Bloomberg recently reported that the average price for gasoline dropped 4.21 cents over two weeks to about $3.48 a gallon on Aug. 22.

    According to the Energy Information Administration, gas prices hit about $3.45 on Monday and the average price is nearly 10 cents lower than the same time last year. On the East Coast, prices are more than 15 cents lower than last year and Gulf Coast drivers have seen a more than 14 cent reduction since last year.


    The Obama administration SHOULD be against fracking. There is a lot of evidence that tracking is bad for the environment. We should be putting our resources into developing better solar and wind power.


    Yes because fairy dust and unicorn shit will keep civilization going. icon_rolleyes.gif Do please educate yourself as to what the current alternatives are and how bad they are for the environment given that a transition to solar can't happen overnight - or likely the next few decades.


    Burying your head in the sand won't make solar and wind power more useful - putting resources behind them will.
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    Aug 31, 2014 7:39 PM GMT
    waccamatt saidBurying your head in the sand won't make solar and wind power more useful - putting resources behind them will.


    You're right it won't make them more useful but if you paid attention to the funds that are already there and the failures of public funding to date, you might be a bit more reticent... to say nothing of the fact that in the meantime the world burns more expensive and dirty fuels because of your environmental puritanism. But that's the thing about burying your head in the sand...
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    Sep 01, 2014 1:43 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidWhat's remarkable is that this boom is solely on private land. Now imagine the effect if the Obama Administration was actually supportive of fracking.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/08/26/fracking-boom-continues-to-drive-gas-prices-downward/

    Despite conflicts in the Middle East, U.S. drivers are seeing gasoline prices plummet thanks to huge increases in domestic crude oil production from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

    Booming U.S. crude oil production has helped put downward pressure on prices, which have been reflected at the pump. Bloomberg recently reported that the average price for gasoline dropped 4.21 cents over two weeks to about $3.48 a gallon on Aug. 22.

    According to the Energy Information Administration, gas prices hit about $3.45 on Monday and the average price is nearly 10 cents lower than the same time last year. On the East Coast, prices are more than 15 cents lower than last year and Gulf Coast drivers have seen a more than 14 cent reduction since last year.


    I love debunking your pro-oil and gas bullshit:

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/08/29/1325694/-Pennsylvania-Makes-Public-243-Cases-of-Fracking-Contaminated-Water?detail

    Oh, and gas prices certainly haven't gone down by a significant amount in PA, CT, or NY. Just yesterday, I paid $3.59/gal., and I've seen it as high as $3.69/gal. in some local Sullivan County, NY, gas stations.
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    Sep 01, 2014 1:48 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi said
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi saidThe problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.


    I don't think there is significant concern anymore about the fracking fluids. I think the bigger concerns are the amount of water usage + improper sealing around the wells forcing methane into ground water/wells - and both issues have been largely mitigated in recent years with better technology (some wells even use very little water - and current technology actually uses the same as other forms of conventional oil extraction) and improved monitoring.

    I do think it's difficult to both be for "the environment" and civilization but be against fracking though only because of how much cleaner natural gas burns relative to other fuels (especially since we will need some transitional fuel towards something like economically viable fusion/solar).


    You must know things no one else knows because the companies doing the fracking continue to refuse to divulge what chemicals they are using.
    I am not (necessarily) anti new technology, i am pro transparency.


    A number of companies do actually disclose (e.g. Range Resources is explicit in the additives they use). In addition, other companies use any varying combination - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_additives_for_hydraulic_fracturing

    Where there is limited disclosure is the combination and amounts because companies want to hide it from each other given that the combination gives varying levels of optimized outputs for the specific geography.


    But not one of those companies disclose ALL chemicals or the amount of those chemicals used in their "proprietary" recipes.

    Please stop with the propaganda. It's obvious from reading through the responses in this thread that you're fighting a losing battle.
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    Sep 01, 2014 1:50 PM GMT
    Darwin1122 saidSolar and wind, solar and wind, I'm so sick of hearing this wishful thinking crap. Why don't we just fill our tanks up with farts and rainbows while we're at it. Natural gas is much cleaner burning than oil or coal and while there's a lot of hype surrounding fracking there isn't any good evidence that it is dangerous to the environment. "Gas Land" is full of misinformation. Oh and it also happens to be abundant and domestic which means its good for the economy and helps keep us out of oil wars. Frack that shit.



    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
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    Sep 01, 2014 2:25 PM GMT
    What ive noticed since 2005 Katrina incident. Since that year, whenever anyone opens there mouth about a storm in the Gulf that gives them a excuse to raise gas prices at least where I live in Georgia. Havent really seen it happen before that year and ive been driving since 1979.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Sep 01, 2014 2:41 PM GMT

    Probably if the US wasn't so car centric with its fierce love affair with the automobile and all the pathologies associated with it like DWIs and suburban sprawl, we wouldn't have to be concerned about gas prices. It is time to stop subsidizing the automobile and increase funding for other modes of transportation like high speed rail, light rail, buses, and bike paths. It is also time to permanently prohibit the design and construction of new limited access superhighways. It is time to halt the progress on that I-69 NAFTA superhighway from Indianapolis to Laredo. All other proposed interstate corridors should be killed dead by de-designation as highway routes. It is time to give tax breaks to commuters who use public transportation daily or ride their bikes to work on a daily basis.
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    Sep 01, 2014 3:08 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    Probably if the US wasn't so car centric with its fierce love affair with the automobile and all the pathologies associated with it like DWIs and suburban sprawl, we wouldn't have to be concerned about gas prices. It is time to stop subsidizing the automobile and increase funding for other modes of transportation like high speed rail, light rail, buses, and bike paths. It is also time to permanently prohibit the design and construction of new limited access superhighways. It is time to halt the progress on that I-69 NAFTA superhighway from Indianapolis to Laredo. All other proposed interstate corridors should be killed dead by de-designation as highway routes. It is time to give tax breaks to commuters who use public transportation daily or ride their bikes to work on a daily basis.


    "car centric with its fierce love affair with the automobile"

    Here you go

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    Sep 01, 2014 3:21 PM GMT
    credo said
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi said
    riddler78 said
    Wyndahoi saidThe problem with fracking is that there is too little evidence it is safe. It is rushing forward without adequate oversight and research.
    The companies won't even give a straight answer about what they are pumping into the earth. Too much government oversight is stifling. But the ground water belongs to all of us. We have a right to know what is being put into it.


    I don't think there is significant concern anymore about the fracking fluids. I think the bigger concerns are the amount of water usage + improper sealing around the wells forcing methane into ground water/wells - and both issues have been largely mitigated in recent years with better technology (some wells even use very little water - and current technology actually uses the same as other forms of conventional oil extraction) and improved monitoring.

    I do think it's difficult to both be for "the environment" and civilization but be against fracking though only because of how much cleaner natural gas burns relative to other fuels (especially since we will need some transitional fuel towards something like economically viable fusion/solar).


    You must know things no one else knows because the companies doing the fracking continue to refuse to divulge what chemicals they are using.
    I am not (necessarily) anti new technology, i am pro transparency.


    A number of companies do actually disclose (e.g. Range Resources is explicit in the additives they use). In addition, other companies use any varying combination - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_additives_for_hydraulic_fracturing

    Where there is limited disclosure is the combination and amounts because companies want to hide it from each other given that the combination gives varying levels of optimized outputs for the specific geography.


    But not one of those companies disclose ALL chemicals or the amount of those chemicals used in their "proprietary" recipes.

    Please stop with the propaganda. It's obvious from reading through the responses in this thread that you're fighting a losing battle.


    If you bothered doing just a little research you would know at least a few companies disclose ALL the chemicals. This is a response to another thread so if you don't like the fact that there are alternative more educated views than your own, the internet may not be your thing ;)
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    Sep 01, 2014 10:33 PM GMT
    ^
    List the companies and their respective websites, fool.

    Don't attempt to project your ignorance. I know more about this industry than you ever will, boy.
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    Sep 02, 2014 1:45 AM GMT
    credo said^
    List the companies and their respective websites, fool.

    Don't attempt to project your ignorance. I know more about this industry than you ever will, boy.


    The common thread that binds so many angry old liberals like yourself together is this insistence either to claim you know more than others (who you don't actually know or care to know) or that you can speak for others with the majority on your side when neither appears to be true. As best I can tell it's a pretty lame attempt to obfuscate either the desperation in your arguments or your stupidity.

    As for your request, here are two that I quickly dug up, I'm sure there are more:

    http://public.bakerhughes.com/shalegas/disclosure.html
    http://www.rangeresources.com/getdoc/50e3bc03-3bf6-4517-a29b-e2b8ef0afe4f/Well-Completion-Reports.aspx

    And by the way - if your arguments are any indication, I can see you're lazy but google really isn't that difficult or complicated to use.