Losing Body Fat/Muscle Building as a Fitness Instructor

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    Aug 30, 2014 3:02 AM GMT
    I am a group fitness instructor that teaches a cardio class 6 days a week. I have been doing this for a little over two years now and I have helped many in their fitness goals and weightloss. However, now I feel that I have over trained my body and I cannot get the results that I want. I recently had a resting metabolic test done and found out that I burn sugar when Im at rest and that all my training zones are out of whack. I chalk this up to all the teaching I do. With this finding, I starting meeting with a nutritionist. The nutritionist wants me to each carbs with every meal and also "carb load" one day a week to get ready for my weekends of teaching. I am doing this and have also added weight training/lifting to my workouts. I am just coming up to little over a month of doing this and I have just lost 1% of body fat and I am harding seeing any results from my weight lifting.

    I know I teach way too much and like I tell many of my students, it takes time and wont happen over night. Like many of them, I am just as frustrated, but I refuse to give up any of my classes that I teach and know that this may be an issue to my sucess. I believe there has to be a way I can work around that and use it as an advantage vs a disadvantage.

    Am I doing things correctly? Is there something I am missing with all of this? Any helpful tips to help with my goals would be great.
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Aug 30, 2014 3:10 PM GMT
    if you are the teacher, you dont have to participate in every exercise, its enough u demonstrate and then go around and fix the mistakes your group do.
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    Aug 30, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    If you keep this up you'll be in negative body fat a year from now! icon_wink.gif

    You might try creatine. I found some benefit from a schedule that runs 6 days with 5 gram 4 times a day (approx every 5 hours) and then 5 grams twice a day for another ~6 weeks. Drink lots and lots of water. Break for 4-8 weeks. There aren't any safety risks with creatine.
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    Aug 30, 2014 3:49 PM GMT
    mn1980 saidI am a group fitness instructor that teaches a cardio class 6 days a week. I have been doing this for a little over two years now and I have helped many in their fitness goals and weightloss. However, now I feel that I have over trained my body and I cannot get the results that I want. I recently had a resting metabolic test done and found out that I burn sugar when Im at rest and that all my training zones are out of whack. I chalk this up to all the teaching I do. With this finding, I starting meeting with a nutritionist. The nutritionist wants me to each carbs with every meal and also "carb load" one day a week to get ready for my weekends of teaching. I am doing this and have also added weight training/lifting to my workouts. I am just coming up to little over a month of doing this and I have just lost 1% of body fat and I am harding seeing any results from my weight lifting.

    I know I teach way too much and like I tell many of my students, it takes time and wont happen over night. Like many of them, I am just as frustrated, but I refuse to give up any of my classes that I teach and know that this may be an issue to my sucess. I believe there has to be a way I can work around that and use it as an advantage vs a disadvantage.

    Am I doing things correctly? Is there something I am missing with all of this? Any helpful tips to help with my goals would be great.



    You are listening to an old school nutritionist. If you are teaching cardio as weight management you also need to go back to school. Most of my yoga teachers are fat .... Vegan noodle / rice diets suck for athletes .

    Read Dr. Cordain's book Paleo for Athletes and or Robb Wolf's book The Paleo Solution. Basically you need to switch your metabolism to a fat burning rather than sugar burning one and reduce your body's production of Cortisol from cardio over training )
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    Aug 30, 2014 7:27 PM GMT
    I find it interesting that your nutritionist is asking you to do a carb load. Which kind of carbs? Carbs are not made equal.

    Wouldn't it be more interesting if your diet contained more healthy fats? They all have a low glycemic index, will give you a lot of energy slowly, probably the kind of energy you need.

    My personal trainer -- who also happens to be an ectomorph -- is struggling with the same issue. It all comes down to his diet, but (1) he has no time to eat it (2) it's too costly for him. My current 7000 Kcal diet -- which he would love to do -- consumes 50% of my liquid income.
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    Aug 30, 2014 7:54 PM GMT
    bachian saidI find it interesting that your nutritionist is asking you to do a carb load. Which kind of carbs? Carbs are not made equal.

    Wouldn't it be more interesting if your diet contained more healthy fats? They all have a low glycemic index, will give you a lot of energy slowly, probably the kind of energy you need.

    My personal trainer -- who also happens to be an ectomorph -- is struggling with the same issue. It all comes down to his diet, but (1) he has no time to eat it (2) it's too costly for him. My current 7000 Kcal diet -- which he would love to do -- consumes 50% of my liquid income.


    I am a zumba instructor, so I dont get to take it easy or walk around in class. If I stop, so does the rest of the class. No matter how many times the students have done the dance routine to a song, they still cant remember it.

    I will bring up the idea of a diet with more health fats and less carbs. The carbs I do eat are ones that come from glueten free options. I have a gluten intolerance. Thus, my carb load night I usually eat rice pasta.
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    Aug 30, 2014 9:23 PM GMT
    ^

    The other good thing about fats (both good and bad) is that they have a high calorie density. You can eat a lot without eating a bunch of food. That means if you have just a 2 min break every 2.5 or 3h, that's more than enough for you to consume all the nutrients you need -- provided there's plenty of fat in it and that the meal is liquid.
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    Aug 31, 2014 9:25 PM GMT
    grofte saidIf you keep this up you'll be in negative body fat a year from now! icon_wink.gif

    You might try creatine. I found some benefit from a schedule that runs 6 days with 5 gram 4 times a day (approx every 5 hours) and then 5 grams twice a day for another ~6 weeks. Drink lots and lots of water. Break for 4-8 weeks. There aren't any safety risks with creatine.


    I'm not a doctor so I'm not going to elaborate on this, but you may want read more about how much you should be taking and probably shouldn't be recommending such doses to someone with such an active lifestyle.






  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Aug 31, 2014 10:42 PM GMT
    In short, you are going to make sure that you 1) lift weights and 2) eat a calorie surplus if you want to gain muscle.

    Your problem is that you are so active, so you burn a lot of calories. Do you track what you eat? Keep track of what you eat for a week or so, measuring portions in grams. Go to myfitnesspal.com or some other online program to calculate calories and macronutrients, and take a look at how many calories you are eating, as well as grams of protein, carbohydrate, and fat. If you are neither gaining nor losing weight, you have found maintenance...so eat more than that.

    Try increasing your calories by 200-250 per day, relying on carbohydrates and fats to raise your calorie needs as long as you are getting about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight (you technically don't need this much protein if you are in a calorie surplus, but I am trying to keep this as simple as possible).

    In terms of weight lifting, instead of going into theories and debates regarding hypertrophy training, the simplest way to approach this is to:

    1) Focus on compound exercises (Bench, Squat, Rows, etc.)
    2) Add in machines to isolate your muscles, especially after you work them with a free-weight, compound exercise.
    3) For most exercises, stick to 6-12 reps.
    4) Increase your workload over time: weights, reps, sets...the most straight-forward way is by increasing the weight.

    In regards to losing fat and building muscle simultaneously...unless you are a total beginner, coming back from an injury / lay off, or are on gear, trying to do this will lead to extremely slow progress that is barely noticeable. Best to "accept your fate" and work in one direction.

    I hope that helps.
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    Sep 01, 2014 4:13 PM GMT
    paracosm said
    grofte saidIf you keep this up you'll be in negative body fat a year from now! icon_wink.gif

    You might try creatine. I found some benefit from a schedule that runs 6 days with 5 gram 4 times a day (approx every 5 hours) and then 5 grams twice a day for another ~6 weeks. Drink lots and lots of water. Break for 4-8 weeks. There aren't any safety risks with creatine.


    I'm not a doctor so I'm not going to elaborate on this, but you may want read more about how much you should be taking and probably shouldn't be recommending such doses to someone with such an active lifestyle.


    Why not? You have got to give a better counter-argument than "I think this sounds like a lot". If he were a vegetarian or pseudo-vegetarian low doses could also make a difference but since I assume that he eats meat and seafood I don't think he is deficient (yes, seafood is meat but some people make the distinction).

    This is based on personal experience, anecdotal evidence, and published research. Where's your warning from and why is it specific to someone with a very active lifestyle?