Storing Dom Perignon

  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Sep 01, 2014 5:18 AM GMT
    I have a bottle of 2004 Dom Perignon that I want to store for a special occasion. (Received as an award at work - yay for me! icon_smile.gif ) What is the best way to store it to preserve its quality and flavor? Thanks for any tips!
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:23 AM GMT
    I'm no expert, but wine and champagne should be stored in a cool/dry place. I don't think those wine fridges are meant for long term storage.
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:27 AM GMT
    In my belly! icon_lol.gif

    Dunno, I'm sure there are better places to look it up than here. I seem to recall something about storing chamaign completely upside down, so the lees get ejected... nah, that's before it's corked. Probably just on it's side in a quiet closet in the basement.
  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Sep 01, 2014 3:19 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidIn my belly! icon_lol.gif

    Dunno, I'm sure there are better places to look it up than here. I seem to recall something about storing chamaign completely upside down, so the lees get ejected... nah, that's before it's corked. Probably just on it's side in a quiet closet in the basement.


    I usually get very good advice here on RJ, and can ignore the occasional snarky sockpuppet.

    But thanks, Mindgarden. I checked the Dom Perignon website and they said to store it at 52-59 degrees F. and in darkness. So that's what I'm doing. icon_cool.gif
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 01, 2014 4:37 PM GMT
    Champagne is not the best wine to age. I would drink it soon. I had a bottle of Taittinger Blanc de Blancs and manufactured a special occasion to drink it with some friends. I still remember the afternoon. Enjoy.
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    Sep 01, 2014 4:59 PM GMT
    If you're going to store wine, it's generally best to keep it in a cool dark space, on its side. This way the contents will keep the cork wet, which stops it from rotting, which would ruin the wine. Rotation of the bottles is apparently important as well, though i'm not sure how frequently it's required.
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:35 PM GMT
    Lucky you! It should keep perfectly well in your wine cellar.

    http://www.jancisrobinson.com/learn/drinking-wine/how-to-store-wine
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:57 PM GMT
    Matt_TO83 saidIf you're going to store wine, it's generally best to keep it in a cool dark space, on its side. This way the contents will keep the cork wet, which stops it from rotting, which would ruin the wine. Rotation of the bottles is apparently important as well, though i'm not sure how frequently it's required.

    Yes. It's not necessary to have the bottle upside down as someone mentioned, just on its side, so the natural cork remains in contact with the contents.

    Some experts advise to NEVER disturb the bottle, until ready to drink. But I know others advise turning the bottle a quarter every 6 months. Use a rack or cellar and try not to move the wine around at all is the latest guidance. Keep the storage temperature below 75º F for all wine, and of course whites and Champagne are commonly chilled for serving.

    Most whites shouldn't be stored longer than 2 years. Reds vary, and some may last up to 10. Champagne and sparkling also vary. The attraction for older vintages isn't always that they've gotten better with age, but rather that they're from an exceptional year. You age whiskeys, but typically not wines.
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    Sep 01, 2014 6:10 PM GMT
    Irrelevant to the OP, but IIRC, champagne bottles used to be stored upside down when you were doing the secondary fermentation in the bottle. The lees collect behind the cork. Then you freeze the necks, carefully open the bottles so that the ice plug (and lees) are forced out, and put in the final cork, all the while retaining pressure in the bottle. I'm sure that large and modern establishments have expensive machines that do it all with less hassle.
  • ursa_minor

    Posts: 566

    Sep 01, 2014 6:53 PM GMT
    Bubblies are best consumed as soon as possible.

    Some whites can be stored (like the sweet ones with noble rot, par example)