Choosing a charity.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 01, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    After watching all of the "Ice Bucket Challenges", all of the pink ribbons for Breast Cancer, the Suicide prevention messages after Robin Williams death, Diabetes Bike rides, Race for the cure, nonstop Food Drives to feed the hungry, Gay Rights....etc...I am left feeling overwhelmed at the need for help in our world that is un-met and ongoing.... is it "REAL" or has "charity" just become another corporate business, that will always find a reason to continue "fundraising" to pay for the executives and staff...etc?
    I am just recently done with Chemotherapy, have fought with depression and mental health issues personally and in my family, cancer in my family, diabetes in my family, obesity personally and in my family, addiction issues.....etc....and want these all to be cured.

    The point being, How do you pick the cause(s) to support with your $$$$ and time?
    Nobody has a bottomless source of money or time....the prioritizing of charities seems and feels like prioritizing the value of lives....
    it is time again to set my donations for the next year and my personal experiences and needs are being met, but I don't have a good way to pic my other causes....anyone with a process? Thanks.
  • sportsjockla

    Posts: 498

    Sep 01, 2014 4:23 PM GMT
    The Charity I give to is http://www.pointfoundation.org/ It helps kids get a college education after being victims of Religious HATE. Many kids in their own families are victims of religious persecution. They are thrown out of their homes. Point gives out scholarships to these victims.
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    Sep 01, 2014 4:28 PM GMT
    you do realise that only a 10th of what you donate goes to a charity at best

    only 8 % of ALS donations goes to research, rest of it are salaries to charity workers etc and of course PROFIT


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbkWyLswCi4
  • SENCGuy1

    Posts: 247

    Sep 01, 2014 4:31 PM GMT
    Salvation Army and the local animal shelter are the charities I support.
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:01 PM GMT
    I avoid the Red Cross like plague. Corrupt beyond words.
  • sportsjockla

    Posts: 498

    Sep 01, 2014 5:22 PM GMT
    atlanticshore saidyou do realise that only a 10th of what you donate goes to a charity at best

    only 8 % of ALS donations goes to research, rest of it are salaries to charity workers etc and of course PROFIT


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbkWyLswCi4


    Each Charity is different. Some charities are subsidized by government. That pays for salaries.

    GOP Congress cut funding to ALS & other research as part of their hostage deal in 2011 when they threatened to default and crash economy. ALS & many other charities now have to front the costs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:23 PM GMT
    atlanticshore saidyou do realise that only a 10th of what you donate goes to a charity at best

    only 8 % of ALS donations goes to research, rest of it are salaries to charity workers etc and of course PROFIT


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbkWyLswCi4



    Look up your charity to find out how it does financially...

    http://www.charitynavigator.org/

    Accordingly....ALS reports that 9% of their funding goes for "administrative expenses"....and 73% goes for support of their programs and research...

    Compensation of Leaders (FYE 01/2014)
    Compensation % of Expenses Paid to Title
    $339,475 1.60% Jane H. Gilbert President & CEO

  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Sep 01, 2014 5:33 PM GMT
    probably better off giving it to people who need it, right into their bare hand.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 01, 2014 5:53 PM GMT
    fye2014.jpg

    here, that is from official als webside, 28 % goes to research at best
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Sep 01, 2014 6:28 PM GMT
    SENCGuy1 saidSalvation Army and the local animal shelter are the charities I support.


    Although the Salvation Army does good work, it has a down side which I consider serious. It discriminates against gay men and women. Also, it unduly controls the lives of its members. When the wife of one long term member died, he remarried. He was discharged from the Salvation Army because his new wife was not a member.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Sep 01, 2014 6:31 PM GMT
    Apparition saidprobably better off giving it to people who need it, right into their bare hand.


    Often a very good way to that your money will go straight to the liquor store or some such. Properly run charities make sure this doesn't happen.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Sep 01, 2014 6:32 PM GMT
    Charitable organizations differ considerably in quality. With some of them, only a small percentage of donations are used for the intended purpose of the contributors. For others, the percentage exceeds 90%.

    Although I see it as a good thing to donate to charitable organizations, one must pick carefully to ensure that one's donations are effective. You can do a google search on "rating charities" to find ways to choose charities that use funds effectively.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Sep 01, 2014 6:35 PM GMT
    tazzari said
    Apparition saidprobably better off giving it to people who need it, right into their bare hand.


    Often a very good way to that your money will go straight to the liquor store or some such. Properly run charities make sure this doesn't happen.


    You're right.

    If one is asked for money for food, a good approach is to offer to take the person to a restaurant and pay for the meal. If the asker really is hungry and needs food, he will probably accept the offer, else he will make excuses to reject the offer.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Sep 01, 2014 6:38 PM GMT
    You have to research the charity in question. The first thing is to find out how much of your money goes where you want it to.

    When I started donating to Pride, in Seattle, I donated to a specific scholarship, and all of it went there. Later, one of the directors, who is the husband of a good friend, told me that so few people donated to the general fund that they had issues paying salaries and keeping the heat on. So I started donating to the general fund.

    World Vision is another solid foundation, despite the fact that the management is homophobic: 100% of your donation goes straight to the child, and when you send an extra amount, as at Christmas, you get receipts to show where it was spent.

    Some foundations with Big Names however, spend so much on PR and fancy ads, that a large percentage of your donation never sees the intended recipient.

    The moral of the story: do some research. There's a lot of good to be done by supporting the right project, and if you ask and do a bit of digging, you can sort out the good ones.

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    Sep 01, 2014 6:47 PM GMT
    FRE0 saidCharitable organizations differ considerably in quality. With some of them, only a small percentage of donations are used for the intended purpose of the contributors. For others, the percentage exceeds 90%.

    Although I see it as a good thing to donate to charitable organizations, one must pick carefully to ensure that one's donations are effective. You can do a google search on "rating charities" to find ways to choose charities that use funds effectively.

    With the one I support and participate in, that percentage is a full 100%. Every penny individuals donate to us is distributed to 7 non-profit HIV/AIDS agencies. We do have operating overhead, to run our annual bike ride, but it's only 20% of what we bring in. And those costs (road permits, truck rentals, porta-johns, pit stops, tentage, etc) are covered by corporate and other business sponsors.

    My husband and I have chosen a number of HIV/AIDS charities to support, because both of us lost a partner to AIDS. That's a very strong & personal incentive.
  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Sep 02, 2014 1:34 AM GMT
    I think this is an excellent discussion.

    P.S. Charity Navigator rocks. I contribute to an organization only after first reading up on it at charitynavigator.org. Obviously, it doesn't review every charitable organization, though it does review thousands.
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    Sep 02, 2014 2:00 AM GMT
    atlanticshore saidfye2014.jpg

    here, that is from official als webside, 28 % goes to research at best


    If this is accurate, it's incredibly efficient. Being on the research side of things, I know that Patient education and public awareness are just as important as a "cure." Gardsil has been around for ~7 years as a prevention for the key strains of HPV that lead to cervical and anal cancers, and we still have people that don't vaccinate their children because they're not educated. 1/3 to research, 1/3 to education, and 1/3 to sustainability seems a pretty balanced, and forward thinking charity, in my opinion.
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    Sep 02, 2014 3:58 AM GMT
    I think it's important to not be overwhelmed by how much need there is, and how little our help is. Find a charity that you think is good, and give enough so that you are giving your share. People contribute different amounts based on their income and needs. Just give and don't worry. Even if the organization doesn't spend you money the most efficient way possible, God will see that you gave the money, and it will have a good spiritual effect.
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    Sep 02, 2014 4:37 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    tazzari said
    Apparition saidprobably better off giving it to people who need it, right into their bare hand.


    Often a very good way to that your money will go straight to the liquor store or some such. Properly run charities make sure this doesn't happen.


    You're right.

    If one is asked for money for food, a good approach is to offer to take the person to a restaurant and pay for the meal. If the asker really is hungry and needs food, he will probably accept the offer, else he will make excuses to reject the offer.


    I NEVER give money to anyone on the street. What pittance you give will not solve anything for that person and will only give them incentive to keep panhandling. I live in a tourist town and too many able bodied young people are on the streets looking for a handout and it's quite obvious why they don't have jobs. They are too fuckin lazy to make up a good story for why they need money. They just hold up a sign asking for a handout! Too fuckin' lazy to even speak!

    Please do not come to my town and feed the foul smelling street people. I promise not to come to your pristine suburban community and piss on your lawn and vomit on your steps.
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    Sep 02, 2014 12:48 PM GMT
    To Sporty_G, I wish you the best and continued recovery.

    I have worked for non-profits and fundraised for others; before you give any charity a dime of your money, do your homework. Even within the same cause, all organizations are run/managed differently. Although there is no "industry standard" for what percentage of donor dollars actually goes to providing services, a reasonable benchmark is 65% or more. (Ideally, much more - but if it's a large organization and they provide healthcare to employees, costs add up.)

    These 501(c)3 organizations are required to disclose financials and most post this data on their web site.
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    Sep 02, 2014 4:21 PM GMT
    Animal shelters are my priority ..
    But i never give them money , every week i bring to the shelter food , blankets , toys and volunteer as much as i can .
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Sep 02, 2014 6:23 PM GMT
    Animal shelters.. They do more than you can imagine with every dollar. If that isn't your thing, visit your local United Way and discuss their charities. They are all local and the UW is careful to keep their overhead low as well as the overhead of the charities they support. I bet you can find something that suits you and either give money or volunteer your time or both.
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    Sep 02, 2014 7:03 PM GMT
    Not having had any children, my focus has been supporting a variety of groups that assist children, seniors and animals. There are no luggage racks on hearses, so we might as well share what we have been lucky enough to receive.


    Please support the A.S.P.C.A. and Pet's In Need.
  • ComeAndGetMe

    Posts: 78

    Sep 02, 2014 9:50 PM GMT
    I would say: the "Make-a-Wish" foundation! Love their actions, the happiness they bring, I just love them icon_biggrin.gif
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Sep 02, 2014 10:43 PM GMT
    Don't donate through the United Way because most of your donation goes to United Way, not to the charity(s) you choose. Donate directly to the charity of your choice.

    As for choosing which charity to donate your money to, that's strictly a personal choice.

    I have always donated, twice a year to the San Francisco AIDS Emergency Fund.