Eggplant & Butternut Squash Help...!


  • Jan 14, 2009 3:49 PM GMT
    I really have never cooked with these items... I tried Eggplant last night with just some cooking spray in a pan and seasoning and I liked it... almost every recipe I find online has eggplant under sauces and cheese... I want it just by itself... any tips on how to make great eggplant and butternut squash healthy?
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 14, 2009 4:17 PM GMT
    I don't know much about eggplant, but you can roast the butternut squash in the oven. Cut in half length wise, take out the seed and place face down in about 1/2" of water. Roast at 375 until you can pierce the skin with a fork easily.
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    Jan 14, 2009 4:38 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidI don't know much about eggplant, but you can roast the butternut squash in the oven. Cut in half length wise, take out the seed and place face down in about 1/2" of water. Roast at 375 until you can pierce the skin with a fork easily.
    And to continue with this, you can scoop out the flesh and make butternut squash soup out of it too.....it's delicious. I have two types, regular and curry. I'd share the recipes if you're interested. Also have an eggplant casserole recipe somewhere that layers sliced eggplant almost like a lasagna. Most good recipes can be found on foodnetwork.com. Great source for recipes that are consistently good. Bon Appetite!
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    Jan 14, 2009 5:03 PM GMT
    stuffed eggplant:

    1 eggplant
    2 hot peppers (I like spice, so I use the hottest things I can find.)
    tsp of salt
    1/4 cup egg whites
    bread crumbs (or ground oats, which I like better nutritionally)

    split the eggplant in half and hollow out, leaving a this bit of flesh.
    Put the flesh, salt, peppers, and egg whites in a food processor. Whirl until chunky.
    mix bread crumbs into the mixture a little at a time until it is thick, but moist.
    put the mixture into the hollowed shells

    oil a baking dish, and pop into a 350 oven covered for an hour. Then, take off the cover and bake until you have a firm, crusty top.

    eat.
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    Jan 14, 2009 8:26 PM GMT
    Try slicing the eggplant and breading it, mist a little butter spray on top (otherwise the breading won't brown, just burn a bit), and bake that until golden brown. Pour a little bit of warm tomato sauce on, and top with some parmasean cheese. Good stuff right there.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Jan 14, 2009 8:26 PM GMT
    You can roast eggplant or fry it up with just a little garlic and olive oil and it's TASTY. You can eat in in a sandwish, instead of a burger with tomato and lettuce with some dijon mustard, or in a salad. Remember, olive oil is healthy!
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    Jan 14, 2009 9:41 PM GMT
    transformation2008 saidI really have never cooked with these items... I tried Eggplant last night with just some cooking spray in a pan and seasoning and I liked it... almost every recipe I find online has eggplant under sauces and cheese... I want it just by itself... any tips on how to make great eggplant and butternut squash healthy?


    eggplant can be be cut up and stir-fried. It can also be sliced and roasted, or fried, frying isnt inherently bad. you can also try breading it and raosting it and making it into eggplant parm
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    Jan 15, 2009 1:26 AM GMT
    My fave way to eat eggplant is baba ganoush (also spelled 'baba ghanoush' and 'baba ghanouj'.) Basically, you roast, broil, or grill the eggplant in its skin until very soft. The insides are then scooped out and mixed with tahini, lemon juice, and garlic. Google for exact recipes.

    As for butternut squash, I think simply baking it is the tastiest way to prepare it. Cut the squash in half, lengthwise, scoop out the seeds, and place the squash halves, cut side down, in a greased baking dish or cookie sheet with rim (to prevent liquid from spilling.) Bake at around 350 degrees until soft. Higher temperatures caramelize the sugars more, so play around to find the desired taste. As with the eggplant, it's ok if the skin gets quite dark or even a bit charred, because the skin is not eaten.
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    Jan 15, 2009 2:31 AM GMT
    I slice the eggplant lengthwise, drizzle olive oil , salt and pepper and roast it till brow. This gets rid of the extra liquid.
    I take it out of the oven and while still hot add extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar
    eat it with some crusty toasted bread.

    I do this with asparagus as well
    Buon appetite.


  • sarmorgh

    Posts: 36

    Jan 17, 2009 6:01 AM GMT
    Well if you want the eggplant just by itself then you're in luck because it is one of the most versatile vegetables on earth. It takes to almost every cooking method wet or dry. Grilling, sauteing, baking, frying, boiling, and roasting all work great; so just choose your favorite seasonings and go for it! Then you can experiment and make Eggplant Parmesan or cube it and throw it into pasta, the possibilities are endless.
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    Jan 19, 2009 3:33 AM GMT
    Any suggestions on how to choose a butternut squash? What to look for in terms of ripeness or quality?
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    Jan 19, 2009 4:33 PM GMT
    theatrengym saidAny suggestions on how to choose a butternut squash? What to look for in terms of ripeness or quality?


    No soft spots or funking looking protrusions around the stem. Oh, and bigger isn't always better.
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    Jan 19, 2009 4:39 PM GMT
    Take the eggplant and carefully cut into 1" cubes.

    Place cubes in garbage disposal. Turn on garbage disposal for 30 seconds.

    Use bleach to thoroughly clean disposal.
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    Jan 19, 2009 8:14 PM GMT
    Thanks, buckwheet.
  • Mikeylikesit

    Posts: 1021

    Jan 19, 2009 8:21 PM GMT
    Try slicing it, drizzeling alittle olive oil And place of the Grill for a few..Good stuff.......icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 26, 2009 8:59 PM GMT
    I like to make butternut squash soup - it's fantasic and makes a great filling meal. You can also freeze any left-overs.

    From his book Jamie at Home;

    Superb Squash Soup with the Best Parmesan Croutons

    Serves 8

    olive oil
    16 fresh sage leaves
    2 red onions, peeled & chopped
    2 stalks of celery, trimmed and chopped
    2 carrots, peeled & chopped
    4 cloves of garlic, peeled & chopped
    2 sprigs of fresh rosemary, leaves picked
    1/2-1 fresh red chili, to taste, deseeded, and finely chopped sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    4 1/4 lbs. butternut squash, onion squash or musque de Provence, halved, deseeded & cut into chunks
    2 qts good quality chicken or vegetable stock extra virgin olive oil

    for the croutons:
    extra virgin olive oil
    16 slices of ciabata bread
    a block of Parmesan cheese, for grating

    This fantastic soup is best made with the varieties of squash that have dense, orange flesh such as butternut or onion squash. It's important to use good chicken stock and season the soup well to bring out the nutty, sweet flavor of the squash. Once you've mastered this recipe, you can take the soup in different directions by adding pearl barley, dried pasta or some chopped bacon. Even he smallest amount of dried porcini.

    Put a very large saucepan on a medium heat and pour in a couple of glugs of olive oil. Add the sage leaves and fry for around 30 seconds or until dark green and crisp.
    Quickly remove them with a slotted spoon to a bowl lined with paper towels-you'll use these for sprinkling over at the end. In the pan you'll be left with a beautifully flavored oil, so put it back on the heat and throw in your onion, celery, carrot, garlic, rosemary leaves, chili and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Cook gently for about 10 minutes until the vegetables are sweet and soft. Add the squash and the stock to the pan, bring to the boil and simmer for around half and hour.

    While the soup is cooking, make your croutons. Drizzle a little olive oil over the ciabatta slices, pat it in a press some grated parmesan into each side. Place in a non-stick pan without any oil and fry until golden on both sides.

    When the squash is soft and cooked through, whiz the soup with an immersion blender or pour it into a standard blender until you have a smooth puree (but you can leave it slightly chunky if you like). Most importantly, remember to taste and season it until it's perfect. Divide the soup between your bowls, placing 2 croutons on top of each. Sprinkle with a few of your crispy sage leaves and drizzle with a swirl of good-quality olive oil.
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    Jan 24, 2011 2:57 AM GMT
    Eggplant can often taste bitter. The trick is to slice the eggplant into circles and then add salt in between the slices. Leave it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes up to 3 hours. Wash away the salt and it's ready to go for any recipe. You can fry it, grill it, bread it, etc.