Of Promotions & Salary Increases

  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Sep 24, 2014 12:28 AM GMT
    Hi all,

    I have a bit of a dilemma and I'm not sure how to tackle it. I am a store manager. I run one of the most profitable stores in the district, with the highest percentage increase across all categories: sales increase, average ticket increase, scan margin increase, shrink decrease, customer count increase, satisfaction surveys, etc. My boss (the district manager) approached me with a proposition of transferring to another higher volume location that is in dire need of assistance. The idea came from our Regional Training Manager who was ready to transfer me long ago. When I was initially hired on with my current employer, the (then) Regional Manager joked about how I came off as a "hot shot" based on my previous experience. Well, to toot my own horn, I showed just how much (and then some) I am... which I'm commended for at meetings and weekly reports.

    The problem is, the store that I would be shifting to does more volume than I do. It's a disgusting, disorganized mess, which nearly gives me an aneurysm considering how anal retentive and organized my own store is. It was explained to me that the store has NEVER been merchandised properly but at its current status has never run better "operationally". I laugh because in order to be operationally correct, you need to be merchandised properly.

    Now, here's my schtick: if I accept the transfer, this will be the fifth store I've cleaned up. It's physically draining as well as emotionally because of all the bullshit in dealing with employees who don't follow policy/hate new management. Now, I laid out a couple stipulations before move: one is a larger salary and the second would be that I transfer after Xmas (since it would be suicide nonetheless).

    However, my boss seems to think it's funny to harp on the fact that I'm paid "too much" for working at my current location. Given the nature of the company, I think if I was indeed "paid too much", I would have been docked quite a while ago, nor would my annual raise have been approved. The woman who is the current manager of the store I would be taking over for does about twice as much volume, but makes about 2K less than I do... and she has worked for the company longer than I have. I attribute that to cost of living increases, but I'm not sure. This is, sadly, all according to what my boss says and I have no way of double checking or verifying anything. I wouldn't be surprised if they're trying to underpay managers.

    Promotions, sadly, do not come often... and I've been conflicted about taking on another shit hole. I guess I've earned the title of "cleanup crew" because of what I've been able to accomplish. Five stores in two years? Yeah, that's pretty damn good. Sadly, once I pass it on to the next person, it starts going downhill again. For this store, though, there are quite a few eyes on me. Our Regional Training Manager for one, and from what I can tell, our Zone Vice President, who is currently acting in the absence of a (new) Regional Manager who is in training. He knows the store hasn't run right since it was put there, so there's a huge burden on me again. Plus, the theft level in the store is about 490% higher than my current one. Yes, the store loses about $49,000 a year because of theft.

    So it comes to this: The most they'd probably give me is a $1,200 raise. So that's about an extra $100 a month. My boss tried using the excuse of "well, the bonuses are larger and are easily obtainable." All fine and dandy, but as the months go on, it gets increasingly difficult to beat your previous years sales. Plus, bonus isn't everything... it's an added perk.

    Am I wrong in thinking that I deserve more given my efforts? Heck, I was considered a "top gun" in the region (as well as across the country) for our 2nd quarter. It's just that I'm bothered by the fact that they drill into our heads what is expected of us, yet most other manager (across the freakin country even) don't bother following the guidelines... and you have people like me who do their job, do it damn good, and get the short end of the stick.
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    Sep 24, 2014 12:37 AM GMT
    [quote]
    [cite]kuroshiro[/cite]
    I run one of the most profitable stores in the district, with the highest percentage increase across all categories: sales increase, average ticket increase, scan margin increase, shrink decrease, customer count increase, satisfaction surveys, etc.
    [/quote]

    Maybe I'm missing something, but this right here suggests you should be applying for other jobs. You're in a great position to be picky with this as your most recent record; broaden your scope, get an offer you can't refuse, and leave on good terms.

    As for the next "promotion", it looks like a great "Plan B". You don't want a tiny raise for a ton of stress on behalf of a boss whom you may really like and get along with but who is ultimately taking advantage of you to be your only option, or even ideally your "Plan A".

    Don't be a jerk about it, and don't advertise the fact that you're shopping around. If nothing else, use this as practice in job hunting and interviewing when things are going your way, since doing the same when you're desperate SUUUUUCKS.
  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Sep 24, 2014 12:51 AM GMT
    I have been actively searching for another job... and most of my customers all agree that I'm better than the job I do anyways, but alas trying to find stuff here is difficult.
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    Sep 24, 2014 1:02 AM GMT
    kuroshiro saidI have been actively searching for another job... and most of my customers all agree that I'm better than the job I do anyways, but alas trying to find stuff here is difficult.


    "Here"? Do you want to stay in the area, and/or do you have to, and/or are you just not wanting to factor in a move?

    Making the most of the situation will probably require a big change either in what you do or in where you are. In my experience, when multiple companies offer similar jobs in the same area, they tend to compete for *lowest* pay and dignity, not highest. Unless you have good reason to know otherwise, a lateral move in your own neighborhood may well be a warning sign in and of itself.

    Besides, with a good plan B to back you up (and at your age), you're free to use your imagination and look for jobs around any place that seems like it might be nice to live.

    Alternatively, put the search on hold, accept the transfer, advertise the promotion on LinkedIn, start grabbing all the references and connections you can, and watch for something special to come along. Hiring is definitely seasonal, though the seasons vary from one occupation/industry to the next.

    In any event, I'm sure you'll do fine. Good luck!
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    Sep 24, 2014 1:03 AM GMT
    I've not worked retail but for summer jobs as a kid. But I did enjoy a few decades in the corporate world, and what I found, generally, is that the guys more willing to move around are the guys more likely to move up.

    So then it depends in part on your willingness to relocate, the importance of staying put and of course, as you say, the money. Don't forget to factor in the cost of living at a new location if you are leaning towards that.
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    Sep 24, 2014 1:28 AM GMT
    Find a new job.
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    Sep 24, 2014 3:36 AM GMT
    Deserving a bigger increase and/or better promotion are different from getting them. If you have the expectation of either you're bound to be disappointed because few people are fairly compensated relative to the profit they bring to a company. I'm not talking about entry level jobs where you'll be underpaid because there are a dozen soon-to-be-graduates waiting in the wings vying to displace you. I know a banker whose two man (including himself) team brings in twice the profit of that international bank's 30 person credit department given the amount of new client business he brings in - 1.5% of the entire net profit - and he's been screwed out of his bonus two years in a row because management says his bonus is tied to OVERALL bank performance. That's a business model I don't understand; why wouldn't a bank want to retain its rainmaker? He's looking to move but at his level in banking it's probably a lot harder moving than it would be for you in the retail. So if you feel unappreciated, look to work elsewhere or moderate your expectations.

    P.S. - The reason he left his previous bank is because just when he was about to be eligible for a pension after 20 years of service after he was one of only TWO people retained from a bank it took over and they asserted that his 17 years at that bank would accrue towards his pension, they reneged. Because they could. And for whatever reason he didn't sue as perhaps he had no legal grounds (I'm not privy to the details).
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    Sep 24, 2014 3:47 AM GMT
    Sounds like YOU should be the Regional Training Manager, you just continue to make THEM look good, I would say before you go to the next fucked up store, make them a deal, tell them you want Regional Manager instead otherwise you stay put and look for another job, they are really under valuing you (um using you), play hardball, you leave and their shit goes down the toilet icon_lol.gificon_mad.gif

    When or if you do look for another job, make sure you highlight your successes at the other stores you turned around!
    You might even get more money this way!
  • Unnamed6

    Posts: 1141

    Sep 24, 2014 4:36 AM GMT
    Psychologically based stressed is generally a matter of perception, so start considering what you perceive as stressful as something that trully isn't. Do work for the sake of work and for the sake that something is ran well. Whether your income improves, or whether you ever get recognized for your efforts, simply be satisfied that things were done and improved because of your involvement. What you say on your profile indicates that you have the psychology that can allow this to happen. And when all is said and done, hopefully you can prepare yourself for the idea that you shouldn't have to be paid at all for something that you have to do, want to do, or be willing to do.
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    Sep 24, 2014 4:50 AM GMT
    Yeah, seriously. OP needs to change his perspective on this. He makes it sound like the 4 previous stores he cleaned up were total burdens. These should be viewed as measurable achievements and should be bullet points on your resume.

    Find a new fuckin job where a potential employer appreciates your work and rewards you accordingly. Get out of New Mexico. Try a bigger city where people actually spend money at retail establishments.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 24, 2014 4:53 AM GMT
    1,200 a year is spit after taxes. Get a new job ASAP!!
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    Sep 24, 2014 3:41 PM GMT
    kuroshiro saidI laugh because in order to be operationally correct, you need to be merchandised properly.


    pff EVERYONE knows that! icon_neutral.gif