Canada Is The Only UN Member To Reject Landmark Indigenous Rights Document

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    Oct 05, 2014 1:41 AM GMT
    Hmmm, I thought most Canadians were "nice".


    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/10/02/canada-un-indigenous-rights_n_5918868.html?utm_hp_ref=tw
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    Oct 05, 2014 2:07 AM GMT
    Leave Canada alone. They have poutine.
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    Oct 05, 2014 2:22 AM GMT
    GloriousCockster saidLeave Canada alone. They have poutine.


    And maple syrup.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Oct 05, 2014 2:26 AM GMT
    and your oil, which has to go through indian land to get to the usa. he did it for you.
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    Oct 05, 2014 2:30 AM GMT
    It's all to protect oil. It makes good people betray themselves.
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    Oct 05, 2014 6:11 AM GMT
    Big deal. Canada's lawyers advised the government that the offending parts could be deemed to be unconstitutional. That would mean the the parliament of Canada would no longer have the final say on drafting all laws. Of course the Government will refuse to accept that.

    It's irrelevant that Canada stands alone in this. Let me know what other country has one of its largest provinces/states faced with the situation of having 110% of it's entire land mass claimed by aboriginal groups (thanks to overlapping claims). Land rights are a huge headache and resource development is being adversely affected as a result. The problems are only going to get worse.
  • Danskerb

    Posts: 286

    Oct 05, 2014 7:21 AM GMT
    I can understand how canada would have a hard time accepting something like this.
    I come from Winnipeg, and there is technically land claims over the entire city which aboriginal groups would like to reclaim.

    I'm Metis. I think canada needs to lose the segregation and start treating all aboriginals and canadians the same and stop giving advantages to aboriginal groups. Getting subsidized school because of my past relatives makes no sence.
  • Kollektiv

    Posts: 24

    Oct 05, 2014 1:47 PM GMT
    Danskerb saidI can understand how canada would have a hard time accepting something like this.
    I come from Winnipeg, and there is technically land claims over the entire city which aboriginal groups would like to reclaim.

    I'm Metis. I think canada needs to lose the segregation and start treating all aboriginals and canadians the same and stop giving advantages to aboriginal groups. Getting subsidized school because of my past relatives makes no sence.


    Actually it makes every bit of sense. The insistence of treating everyone equally today means ignoring the lingering consequences of past inequality.

    It's the same with America and slavery. Whites here say the same thing - oh it was our ancestors who owned the slaves and not us, why does it matter today? But it does matter. Your life opportunities are heavily influenced by your parents' social and financial status. Why else would there be such a staggering wealth gap between whites and blacks today? Because inequality is passed on by generations. And if you decide to "treat evyone equally," you're actually ensuring the perpetuation of that inequality.
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    Oct 05, 2014 2:35 PM GMT
    I wonder if that document also applies to the rights of indigenous Europeans to preserve their religion, culture, way of life, families and traditions.

    Oh what am I saying, of course it doesn't. Europeans need to Blanda Upp, their culture and communities aren't worth preserving.

    Just another bullshit document form the UN, kudos to Canada. Next.
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    Oct 05, 2014 2:46 PM GMT
    Kollektiv said
    Danskerb saidI can understand how canada would have a hard time accepting something like this.
    I come from Winnipeg, and there is technically land claims over the entire city which aboriginal groups would like to reclaim.

    I'm Metis. I think canada needs to lose the segregation and start treating all aboriginals and canadians the same and stop giving advantages to aboriginal groups. Getting subsidized school because of my past relatives makes no sence.


    Actually it makes every bit of sense. The insistence of treating everyone equally today means ignoring the lingering consequences of past inequality.

    It's the same with America and slavery. Whites here say the same thing - oh it was our ancestors who owned the slaves and not us, why does it matter today? But it does matter. Your life opportunities are heavily influenced by your parents' social and financial status. Why else would there be such a staggering wealth gap between whites and blacks today? Because inequality is passed on by generations. And if you decide to "treat everyone equally," you're actually ensuring the perpetuation of that inequality.
    The question is, how far back do the current generations claim rights for their ancestors circumstances or behaivior? Recognizing and correcting past and present biases is vital, but people are not defined by the circumstances of their ancestors. Case in point in the military everyone is treated equally iby the system in place and by and large it is succsessfull in fostering an enviroment of succeess for all equally.
    True equality will be achieved when we all stop defininv ourselves by the narrow view of race, gender or orientation.
    A tall order to be sure.
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    Oct 05, 2014 4:37 PM GMT
    kevex saidHmmm, I thought most Canadians were "nice".


    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/10/02/canada-un-indigenous-rights_n_5918868.html?utm_hp_ref=tw


    They are, and they often show more common sense than Americans, especially when the latter grovel before the altar of political rectitude. Good move, Canada!
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    Oct 05, 2014 6:24 PM GMT
    One of my close friends growing up was blond haired and blue eyed thanks to one European parent. Despite growing up in a middle class environment in a big city with a parent who was a professional white collar worker my friend received a significantly subsidized education, priority with high paying summer jobs as a student and God knows what other benefits thanks to the other parent being aboriginal. I get that kids growing up in remote reservations have a hard time, like many kids growing up in small remote communities, but race-based advantages are going to cause problems down the line when there are a lot more people like my friend out there and people start questioning why taxpayers are subsidizing them.
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    Oct 05, 2014 6:50 PM GMT
    YVRguy saidOne of my close friends growing up was blond haired and blue eyed thanks to one European parent. Despite growing up in a middle class environment in a big city with a parent who was a professional white collar worker my friend received a significantly subsidized education, priority with high paying summer jobs as a student and God knows what other benefits thanks to the other parent being aboriginal. I get that kids growing up in remote reservations have a hard time, like many kids growing up in small remote communities, but race-based advantages are going to cause problems down the line when there are a lot more people like my friend out there and people start questioning why taxpayers are subsidizing them.


    Hmm it does seem like a subliminal form of racism to prefer indigenous people over all other Canadians. At the end f the day white Canadians aren't responsible for what their ancestors did. *shrugs*
  • Kollektiv

    Posts: 24

    Oct 05, 2014 11:27 PM GMT
    RespectablyBuffed said
    Kollektiv said
    Danskerb saidI can understand how canada would have a hard time accepting something like this.
    I come from Winnipeg, and there is technically land claims over the entire city which aboriginal groups would like to reclaim.

    I'm Metis. I think canada needs to lose the segregation and start treating all aboriginals and canadians the same and stop giving advantages to aboriginal groups. Getting subsidized school because of my past relatives makes no sence.


    Actually it makes every bit of sense. The insistence of treating everyone equally today means ignoring the lingering consequences of past inequality.

    It's the same with America and slavery. Whites here say the same thing - oh it was our ancestors who owned the slaves and not us, why does it matter today? But it does matter. Your life opportunities are heavily influenced by your parents' social and financial status. Why else would there be such a staggering wealth gap between whites and blacks today? Because inequality is passed on by generations. And if you decide to "treat everyone equally," you're actually ensuring the perpetuation of that inequality.
    The question is, how far back do the current generations claim rights for their ancestors circumstances or behaivior? Recognizing and correcting past and present biases is vital, but people are not defined by the circumstances of their ancestors. Case in point in the military everyone is treated equally iby the system in place and by and large it is succsessfull in fostering an enviroment of succeess for all equally.
    True equality will be achieved when we all stop defininv ourselves by the narrow view of race, gender or orientation.
    A tall order to be sure.

    That's an important question - but premature. US society has done little to remedy the accumulated disadvantages of the past, particularly for blacks.

    And your example about the military is...well, the military is not exactly the epitome of racial tolerance and equality. Article from just a few weeks ago:http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/11/army-officer-corps-dominated-by-white-men/14987977/
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    Oct 05, 2014 11:33 PM GMT
    We are only nice compared to Americans. lol
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    Oct 06, 2014 3:18 AM GMT
    I don't really know much about Canada except for the fact that black African slaves who sought freedom went there many years ago. And because I like to read history books, a lot of them escaped the skillet and went in to the frying pan. From what I've read from history, the Canadians are often just as racist towards black skinned people as the Americans are, but may be the books I read of first hand accounts from black folks was wrong. But then logically that would make sense: there is no way the racist white Americans would allow a country directly contiguous to it to actually be a country free of its hatred of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr. actually spoke about Canada in one of his speeches. It was enlightening. He gave a different view. But I enjoyed this thread, it gave me a chance to remember stuff I have not thought about in years.
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    Oct 06, 2014 3:23 AM GMT
    kevex said
    GloriousCockster saidLeave Canada alone. They have poutine.


    And maple syrup.
    And hot guys.
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    Oct 06, 2014 3:52 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    kevex said
    GloriousCockster saidLeave Canada alone. They have poutine.


    And maple syrup.
    And hot guys.


    Hot guys covered in maple syrup icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2014 4:42 AM GMT
    Good for Canada.

    I read the document. I wouldn't have supported it either.

    The document is so broad as to also provide support for female circumcision, abortion, euthanasia, sharia law and death by stoning for gays since some cultures claim these practices as indigenous cultural or religious beliefs.

    The document provided something for just about everyone and most of it not good.

    Just like obamacare, maybe no one read the document before they signed it.
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    Oct 06, 2014 5:07 AM GMT
    The UN sucks. Never trust a thing that comes out of that corrupt institution.
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    Oct 07, 2014 12:01 AM GMT
    declansloan saidI don't really know much about Canada except for the fact that black African slaves who sought freedom went there many years ago. And because I like to read history books, a lot of them escaped the skillet and went in to the frying pan. From what I've read from history, the Canadians are often just as racist towards black skinned people as the Americans are, but may be the books I read of first hand accounts from black folks was wrong. But then logically that would make sense: there is no way the racist white Americans would allow a country directly contiguous to it to actually be a country free of its hatred of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr. actually spoke about Canada in one of his speeches. It was enlightening. He gave a different view. But I enjoyed this thread, it gave me a chance to remember stuff I have not thought about in years.
    I worked in Canada back in the 70s. I was struck by the fact that the racism known in the US was not part of the daily experience. There was however a daily bombardment of racist slurs directed at the indigenous peoples. Violent acts sometimes followed. This was totally unexpected from a country that is actually more racially diverse than the US.
  • toastvenom

    Posts: 1020

    Oct 07, 2014 2:05 AM GMT
    don't blame Canada, blame the Stephen Harper government or as I call him Bush Jr's lapdog. Wubya has been gone for awhile but we still got this asshole keeping it white bred and retro
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    Oct 07, 2014 3:54 AM GMT
    Kollektiv said
    RespectablyBuffed said
    Kollektiv said
    Danskerb saidI can understand how canada would have a hard time accepting something like this.
    I come from Winnipeg, and there is technically land claims over the entire city which aboriginal groups would like to reclaim.

    I'm Metis. I think canada needs to lose the segregation and start treating all aboriginals and canadians the same and stop giving advantages to aboriginal groups. Getting subsidized school because of my past relatives makes no sence.


    Actually it makes every bit of sense. The insistence of treating everyone equally today means ignoring the lingering consequences of past inequality.

    It's the same with America and slavery. Whites here say the same thing - oh it was our ancestors who owned the slaves and not us, why does it matter today? But it does matter. Your life opportunities are heavily influenced by your parents' social and financial status. Why else would there be such a staggering wealth gap between whites and blacks today? Because inequality is passed on by generations. And if you decide to "treat everyone equally," you're actually ensuring the perpetuation of that inequality.
    The question is, how far back do the current generations claim rights for their ancestors circumstances or behaivior? Recognizing and correcting past and present biases is vital, but people are not defined by the circumstances of their ancestors. Case in point in the military everyone is treated equally iby the system in place and by and large it is succsessfull in fostering an enviroment of succeess for all equally.
    True equality will be achieved when we all stop defininv ourselves by the narrow view of race, gender or orientation.
    A tall order to be sure.

    That's an important question - but premature. US society has done little to remedy the accumulated disadvantages of the past, particularly for blacks.

    And your example about the military is...well, the military is not exactly the epitome of racial tolerance and equality. Article from just a few weeks ago:http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/11/army-officer-corps-dominated-by-white-men/14987977/


    That is not really the fault of the armed forces. You have to have at least a bachelor's degree to be an officer. And if you have a degree then you are brought in as an officer when you join. The armed forces desegregated LONG before society in general did. Which was actually thought to be instrumental in changing society.
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    Oct 07, 2014 3:57 AM GMT
    declansloan saidI don't really know much about Canada except for the fact that black African slaves who sought freedom went there many years ago. And because I like to read history books, a lot of them escaped the skillet and went in to the frying pan. From what I've read from history, the Canadians are often just as racist towards black skinned people as the Americans are, but may be the books I read of first hand accounts from black folks was wrong. But then logically that would make sense: there is no way the racist white Americans would allow a country directly contiguous to it to actually be a country free of its hatred of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr. actually spoke about Canada in one of his speeches. It was enlightening. He gave a different view. But I enjoyed this thread, it gave me a chance to remember stuff I have not thought about in years.


    Not sure what history books you were reading. But slavery was illegal in Canada since it was part of the British Empire. As opposed to the usa which had the fugitive slave act which meant escaped slaves could be recaptured at anytime. Not that racism didn't or doesn't exist in Canada. Just not even in the same league as the States.
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    Oct 07, 2014 4:41 AM GMT
    nabob7729 said
    declansloan saidI don't really know much about Canada except for the fact that black African slaves who sought freedom went there many years ago. And because I like to read history books, a lot of them escaped the skillet and went in to the frying pan. From what I've read from history, the Canadians are often just as racist towards black skinned people as the Americans are, but may be the books I read of first hand accounts from black folks was wrong. But then logically that would make sense: there is no way the racist white Americans would allow a country directly contiguous to it to actually be a country free of its hatred of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr. actually spoke about Canada in one of his speeches. It was enlightening. He gave a different view. But I enjoyed this thread, it gave me a chance to remember stuff I have not thought about in years.
    I worked in Canada back in the 70s. I was struck by the fact that the racism known in the US was not part of the daily experience. There was however a daily bombardment of racist slurs directed at the indigenous peoples. Violent acts sometimes followed. This was totally unexpected from a country that is actually more racially diverse than the US.
    Oh really? Thanks for sharing your knowledge brother. I love to learn the truth of history, even if the books written on it mix lies with truth. But the day to day interactions of black folk with Canadians contradicts what much of what I have read. You have me fascinated now about finding the truth of things from history about the Canadians. Apparently I must dig deeper and look for additional historical books. Thank you.