Best protein shakes/supplements for someone trying to burn fat & add muscle?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2014 12:03 AM GMT
    I just started a workout routine for the first time in my life at age 24. I've done things before, but I've never stuck to it. But now I'm actually going to the gym and doing weight lifting/cardio a few times a week with a friend of mine, whose Mom happens to be a personal trainer and she's helping us out.

    My main goal right now is to lose weight and burn off fat. And of course, I'd like to put on muscle since I don't have much and I'm pretty weak for someone my age.

    Any recommendations as far as shakes/supplements go?
  • vhotti26

    Posts: 287

    Oct 07, 2014 12:18 PM GMT
    You can't burn fat and build muscles at the same time.

    Generally it's ideal to first get lean and then focus on putting on muscle. The other way around works as well, but you will get big and bloated; and by slimming down first you will get a sense of achievement and stay motivated.

    Working out is a good first step, but you need to get your nutrition in order for results.
    You need to calculate your base metabolic rate and stuff like that. There is a calculator for that here:
    http://scotthermanfitness.com/mealplan.php

    Add the At Rest and In Motion values together and divide by two to get your daily maintenance calories. Then chop off 10% of that value to start losing a bit of weight. Recalculate every week in order to keep making progress. You can eventually go down to 15-20% below the maintenance value, but I wouldn't recommend that.

    To check if your calorie intake is in line with your requirements, you will have to start counting calories - get Myfitnesspal or something similar, it's easy and quick.
    There are some alternatives like the portion size method, but those are more guesswork and I would recommend counting calories like a slave for at least a couple weeks until you really KNOW how many calories the stuff you are eating has.

    Also you will have to check your macronutrient ratio. You should take in 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. That equates to around 30% of your maintenance calories for most guys (carbs and protein have 4 kcals per gram, fat has 9).

    As you want to lose weight, it would be smart to cut carbohydrates a bit as the glycemic index of your food has a lot to do with how easy it is to lose weight, and the fewer carbs you eat the better will your body environment be for weight loss.
    There is absolutely no problem in eating fat to get to your calorie goal, just make sure it's not crappy fat. The fat from almonds and fish and stuff like that is good, fat in a pizza or in mayo obviously isn't. That doesn't mean you can't eat anything of that sort, just don't overdo it. In the end, the most important thing is your calorie intake.

    After you have reached your goal weight and want to start putting on muscle, up your calorie intake to 5-10% above your calculated maintenance requirements and readjust your macronutrients - your protein intake remains the same, but you should add more carbs to the table. You will notice that without a good amount of carbs, you are weak as fuck. That's fine when you are cutting fat, but sucks when you want to build muscle and get stronger.
    A good macro breakdown is 30% Protein, 25% Fat and 45% Carbs when trying to build muscle.

    As for supplements, you don't really need those. Try getting it all from your normal food sources first, only if that doesn't work should you add protein shakes.
    Most brands are okay, as long as you don't get your powder from Wal Mart or crap like that (that's REALLY low quality). A good and cheap source I would always recommend is Myprotein.com. A nice big bag of whey protein from them hasn't hurt anyone yet I am sure.

    The only other supplement I would recommend is Creatine, which is the only legal supplement (besides protein powder and vitamins and stuff) that has been scientifically proven to increase strength. 5g per day taken whenever it's convenient is fine. Don't listen to people telling you to take it exactly 30 minutes before a workout, that's broscience.

    And of course if you don't eat enough veggies and fruit, it's never bad to add a multivitamin to your supplement list, regardless if you are doing sports or just sitting at home, that's always smart. You can get those at any store these days.

    The most important thing is to educate yourself about nutrition. The working out is secondary to that only.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2014 4:16 PM GMT
    Check this out http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fat_loss_muscle_gain_supplement_guide.htm
  • vhotti26

    Posts: 287

    Oct 07, 2014 4:32 PM GMT
    No offense, but the site of a vendor is probably not the best place to look for advice.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 07, 2014 7:47 PM GMT
    vhotti26 saidYou can't burn fat and build muscles at the same time.

    Generally it's ideal to first get lean and then focus on putting on muscle. The other way around works as well, but you will get big and bloated; and by slimming down first you will get a sense of achievement and stay motivated.

    Working out is a good first step, but you need to get your nutrition in order for results.
    You need to calculate your base metabolic rate and stuff like that. There is a calculator for that here:
    http://scotthermanfitness.com/mealplan.php

    Add the At Rest and In Motion values together and divide by two to get your daily maintenance calories. Then chop off 10% of that value to start losing a bit of weight. Recalculate every week in order to keep making progress. You can eventually go down to 15-20% below the maintenance value, but I wouldn't recommend that.

    To check if your calorie intake is in line with your requirements, you will have to start counting calories - get Myfitnesspal or something similar, it's easy and quick.
    There are some alternatives like the portion size method, but those are more guesswork and I would recommend counting calories like a slave for at least a couple weeks until you really KNOW how many calories the stuff you are eating has.

    Also you will have to check your macronutrient ratio. You should take in 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. That equates to around 30% of your maintenance calories for most guys (carbs and protein have 4 kcals per gram, fat has 9).

    As you want to lose weight, it would be smart to cut carbohydrates a bit as the glycemic index of your food has a lot to do with how easy it is to lose weight, and the fewer carbs you eat the better will your body environment be for weight loss.
    There is absolutely no problem in eating fat to get to your calorie goal, just make sure it's not crappy fat. The fat from almonds and fish and stuff like that is good, fat in a pizza or in mayo obviously isn't. That doesn't mean you can't eat anything of that sort, just don't overdo it. In the end, the most important thing is your calorie intake.

    After you have reached your goal weight and want to start putting on muscle, up your calorie intake to 5-10% above your calculated maintenance requirements and readjust your macronutrients - your protein intake remains the same, but you should add more carbs to the table. You will notice that without a good amount of carbs, you are weak as fuck. That's fine when you are cutting fat, but sucks when you want to build muscle and get stronger.
    A good macro breakdown is 30% Protein, 25% Fat and 45% Carbs when trying to build muscle.

    As for supplements, you don't really need those. Try getting it all from your normal food sources first, only if that doesn't work should you add protein shakes.
    Most brands are okay, as long as you don't get your powder from Wal Mart or crap like that (that's REALLY low quality). A good and cheap source I would always recommend is Myprotein.com. A nice big bag of whey protein from them hasn't hurt anyone yet I am sure.

    The only other supplement I would recommend is Creatine, which is the only legal supplement (besides protein powder and vitamins and stuff) that has been scientifically proven to increase strength. 5g per day taken whenever it's convenient is fine. Don't listen to people telling you to take it exactly 30 minutes before a workout, that's broscience.

    And of course if you don't eat enough veggies and fruit, it's never bad to add a multivitamin to your supplement list, regardless if you are doing sports or just sitting at home, that's always smart. You can get those at any store these days.

    The most important thing is to educate yourself about nutrition. The working out is secondary to that only.


    You make it seem excessively complicated. Many people have gained muscle and lost fat without treating living as a medical procedure.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2014 8:20 PM GMT
    Lol at not being able to burn fat and gain muscle at the same time. That is a ridiculous statement. If you lift weights 4 times a week, and target each muscle group, you will notice changes within a month. The more muscle you have the more calories you burn at rest. Also a good diet is crucial. Incorporate lean meats, chicken and fish as well as vegetables and foods with complex carbs. Remember your body needs food to build muscle, so dony eat like a bird because youre 'trying to l fat'. Eat about six controlled.portions to keep your metabolism moving and youre set.
  • vhotti26

    Posts: 287

    Oct 07, 2014 8:48 PM GMT
    djesco saidLol at not being able to burn fat and gain muscle at the same time. That is a ridiculous statement.


    No, it's a fact. You can obviously reduce your body fat percentage by building muscle. But you are not burning any fat in the process, it is just the share dropping.
    To build muscle you have to be in a caloric surplus, to burn fat you have to be in a deficit. That is a hard fact. In the beginning, you might manage to do both simultaneously for a couple weeks, but once the newb gains are over and your body adapts, that won't work anymore.


    Now, as for ridiculous statements...

    djesco saidEat about six controlled.portions to keep your metabolism moving and youre set.


    This is. You can just as well eat one meal a day with all your calories. Eating 6 meals a day is broscience. He should eat as many meals as are convenient to him.
    The idea that eating many meals keeps the metabolism up and running is ludicrous, as is the notion that the body can't digest more than 30 grams of protein per meal.
    I guess the cavemen would have had a pretty hard time considering they only had access to protein very infrequently but in bulk.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2014 11:00 PM GMT
    vhotti26 saidYou can't burn fat and build muscles at the same time.

    Generally it's ideal to first get lean and then focus on putting on muscle. The other way around works as well, but you will get big and bloated; and by slimming down first you will get a sense of achievement and stay motivated.

    Working out is a good first step, but you need to get your nutrition in order for results.
    You need to calculate your base metabolic rate and stuff like that. There is a calculator for that here:
    http://scotthermanfitness.com/mealplan.php

    Add the At Rest and In Motion values together and divide by two to get your daily maintenance calories. Then chop off 10% of that value to start losing a bit of weight. Recalculate every week in order to keep making progress. You can eventually go down to 15-20% below the maintenance value, but I wouldn't recommend that.

    To check if your calorie intake is in line with your requirements, you will have to start counting calories - get Myfitnesspal or something similar, it's easy and quick.
    There are some alternatives like the portion size method, but those are more guesswork and I would recommend counting calories like a slave for at least a couple weeks until you really KNOW how many calories the stuff you are eating has.

    Also you will have to check your macronutrient ratio. You should take in 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. That equates to around 30% of your maintenance calories for most guys (carbs and protein have 4 kcals per gram, fat has 9).

    As you want to lose weight, it would be smart to cut carbohydrates a bit as the glycemic index of your food has a lot to do with how easy it is to lose weight, and the fewer carbs you eat the better will your body environment be for weight loss.
    There is absolutely no problem in eating fat to get to your calorie goal, just make sure it's not crappy fat. The fat from almonds and fish and stuff like that is good, fat in a pizza or in mayo obviously isn't. That doesn't mean you can't eat anything of that sort, just don't overdo it. In the end, the most important thing is your calorie intake.

    After you have reached your goal weight and want to start putting on muscle, up your calorie intake to 5-10% above your calculated maintenance requirements and readjust your macronutrients - your protein intake remains the same, but you should add more carbs to the table. You will notice that without a good amount of carbs, you are weak as fuck. That's fine when you are cutting fat, but sucks when you want to build muscle and get stronger.
    A good macro breakdown is 30% Protein, 25% Fat and 45% Carbs when trying to build muscle.

    As for supplements, you don't really need those. Try getting it all from your normal food sources first, only if that doesn't work should you add protein shakes.
    Most brands are okay, as long as you don't get your powder from Wal Mart or crap like that (that's REALLY low quality). A good and cheap source I would always recommend is Myprotein.com. A nice big bag of whey protein from them hasn't hurt anyone yet I am sure.

    The only other supplement I would recommend is Creatine, which is the only legal supplement (besides protein powder and vitamins and stuff) that has been scientifically proven to increase strength. 5g per day taken whenever it's convenient is fine. Don't listen to people telling you to take it exactly 30 minutes before a workout, that's broscience.

    And of course if you don't eat enough veggies and fruit, it's never bad to add a multivitamin to your supplement list, regardless if you are doing sports or just sitting at home, that's always smart. You can get those at any store these days.

    The most important thing is to educate yourself about nutrition. The working out is secondary to that only.


    This seems way too complicated for me to comprehend lol.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 08, 2014 6:08 AM GMT
    It's very simple: you cant--those two things are diametrically opposed.

    There will be people out there who will tell you CAN do both at the same time, and while that's true to a degree, that approach is flawed and not ideal and will not yield the best results.

    Like the other person suggested, choose one of those two goals to start out with and stick with it for a while (you probably want to focus on leaning out first) and then once you've reached a milestone switch over to the other goal and focus on that one until you reach a milestone for it.

    The reason why is this: in order to quickly lose body fat you'll want to be a caloric defect. However in order to gain muscle you'll want to be in a (quality) caloric surplus. You can't do both at the same time and expect quick changes for both goals at the same time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 08, 2014 11:50 AM GMT
    You CAN lose fat, and gain muscle, at the same time. It's called changing your body composition. Need plenty of calories, and plenty of physical activity, to boost your metabolism. Lean muscle burns calories at rest. The more lean muscle you have, the more calories you burn just sitting around. I've done this many times.

    Make SURE you eat ENOUGH. Otherwise, you suffer from metabolic lag / famine syndrome and get "skinny fat."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 09, 2014 12:44 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidYou CAN loose fat, and gain muscle, at the same time. It's called changing your body composition. Need plenty of calories, and plenty of physical activity, to boost your metabolism. Lean muscle burns calories at rest. The more lean muscle you have, the more calories you burn just sitting around. I've done this many times.

    Make SURE you eat ENOUGH. Otherwise, you suffer from metabolic lag / famine syndrome and get "skinny fat."
    This! Thank you C.S.!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 09, 2014 2:57 AM GMT
    Yeah. Think of a friend who went to military basic training. Fatties get leaner, and more muscular; skinny guys gain weight and add more muscle....and...they are well fed to sustain the intense activity. Bodybuilding 101.

    You starve yourself, and your body slows to a crawl...famine syndrome. That's why fatties give up, and skinny folks fail. YOU GOTTA EAT. YOU GOTTA GET BUSY.
  • vhotti26

    Posts: 287

    Oct 10, 2014 2:34 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidYeah. Think of a friend who went to military basic training. Fatties get leaner, and more muscular; skinny guys gain weight and add more muscle....and...they are well fed to sustain the intense activity. Bodybuilding 101.


    More like newb gains 101.

    As if military basic training would be comparable to prolonged bodybuilding efforts. Are you effing serious?
  • Kovyn

    Posts: 117

    Oct 20, 2014 2:54 AM GMT
    So much oldschool ideology and broscience happening right now.

    You can't gain muscle and lose fat at the same time. Period. (First time gym-goers exempt). In order to gain muscle you need a calorie surplus; in order to lose fat you need a calorie deficit; "lean-bulking" and the reverse are highly ineffective compared to the latter. Do the forum a favor and go educate yourself with some post-2010 articles from reputable sources before calling me wrong. However, since OP is a first time lifter, his body is about to go through the most transformational period of his lifting career. He may very well be able to put on muscle while losing fat. (Before we go any further, educate yourself; I'm not contradicting myself, do your research).

    That being said, and to answer your question, there is no substitute for real food. The only supplement you need are multi-vitamins, and optionally creatine and BCAA's/aminos. All other supplements are garbage. It's that simple.

    /thread