This Is What Happens If You Wear Magnetic Items In An MRI Machine

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    Oct 07, 2014 4:12 AM GMT
    Prior to patients entering a medical scanning room, they must be thoroughly screened for magnetic objects—including some earrings, belts, and early-model pacemakers.This is because MRI magnetic fields are incredibly strong.

    However, accidents do happen. Through the years, reports of a brain aneurysm clip being dislodged, an oxygen tank hitting a patient in the head, and metallic fragments slicing patients have surfaced. Therefore, when a group of scientists heard about an MRI machine that was about to be decommissioned, they decided to create an educational video about the dangers of magnetic items near MRI machines. Check out the video from practiCalfMRI below.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BBx8BwLhqg
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    Oct 07, 2014 5:06 AM GMT
    The company that I used to work for once tried to build the world's biggest magnet. (About 5 or 6 times more powerful than the one in the video.) Although by the time it was actually finished, the field was about 10% lower than planned and they spent so much time screwing around having meetings that someone else aced them out.

    ANYWAY, I've been in the rooms with all the big ones.* They sit in the middle of a room about the size of a basketball court. Every one of them has a collection of crap plastered to the side of it that people accidentally brought into the room. A janitor's broom. A pen. Somebody's belt buckle (!) The stuff is pretty much stuck there until the next maintenance cycle.

    I'd like to see how the belt buckle got up there, exactly. icon_razz.gif

    *Well, I mean in the 90's. Lots more of them now.
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    Oct 07, 2014 5:14 AM GMT
    1000 razor blades + an MRI machine = elaborate torture device. icon_twisted.gif
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    Oct 07, 2014 6:40 AM GMT
    I definitely appreciate the technology, but I hate being inside those things. Fuckin scary as hell.
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    Oct 07, 2014 3:10 PM GMT
    When metal is near the MRI machine, the metal ALSO gets very hot to the point that it will burn. This is why patients are screened from head to toe prior to the procedure. Nowadays, with the exception of pacemakers, many of the metal items found in patients such as aneurysm coils, replacement hips, etc. are compatible with MRI.
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    Oct 07, 2014 5:02 PM GMT
    Hey, that looked like my old office chair! Very cool video - I like the intelligent banter among the physicists! Thanks for posting this
  • FRE0

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    Oct 07, 2014 7:06 PM GMT
    Erik101 saidWhen metal is near the MRI machine, the metal ALSO gets very hot to the point that it will burn. This is why patients are screened from head to toe prior to the procedure. Nowadays, with the exception of pacemakers, many of the metal items found in patients such as aneurysm coils, replacement hips, etc. are compatible with MRI.


    Some metals do become hot when exposed to a magnetic field; that is known as the magnetocaloric effect. For more information, do a google search on "magneto caloric effect". However, not all metals are affected.

    The magnetocaloric effect has been known for more than a century. It is used to achieve temperatures close to absolute zero.

    MRI rooms often have surveillance cameras and the cameras sometimes record accidents which are available on youtube. There is one that shows a custodian wheeling a floor cleaning machine into an MRI room. The MRI magnet pulled the floor machine out of the man's hands, despite his desperate efforts to hang onto it, and crashed violently into the MRI machine. There are also videos of oxygen tanks and desk chairs being captured by the machine. It's interesting to watch the expressions on the faces of people when such accidents occur. To get objects free of the machine, it would be necessary to quench the magnet which is never done without good reason.
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    Oct 07, 2014 7:11 PM GMT
    Have a safe imaging
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    Oct 08, 2014 11:44 AM GMT
    I have a mesh repair for a very large incisional hernia in my abdomen, that is about 17 years old. When I had an emergency and was taken in for an MRI about 2+ years ago....we had some serious issues with it, and discovered that I needed to have it replaced.....as some part of the original repair with the mesh was on recall. I was not able to have an MRI....until this "mesh" was replaced....I remember the pains I was experiencing near the machine were intense...but I was pretty out of it at the time too....
    that tube is way too claustrophobic for me...and the noises....wow!icon_eek.gif
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    Oct 08, 2014 3:28 PM GMT
    Sporty_G saidI have a mesh repair for a very large incisional hernia in my abdomen, that is about 17 years old. When I had an emergency and was taken in for an MRI about 2+ years ago....we had some serious issues with it, and discovered that I needed to have it replaced.....as some part of the original repair with the mesh was on recall. I was not able to have an MRI....until this "mesh" was replaced....I remember the pains I was experiencing near the machine were intense...but I was pretty out of it at the time too....
    that tube is way too claustrophobic for me...and the noises....wow!icon_eek.gif


    Upright_MRI_ClermontRadiology.jpg
    They have open MRI scanners too. Look for one next time you need an MRI.