Childhood Books

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    Jan 15, 2009 7:51 PM GMT
    Went through some boxes of old stuff the other day and found some of the books I could not get enough of when I was a kid. My all time favorites were Charlotte's Web, Where the Red Fern Grows, and ANY of the Goosebumps series.

    What about you guys...all time favorite childhood book(s)?
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    Jan 15, 2009 8:16 PM GMT
    The Giving tree,
    Where The Sidewalks Ends
    a Light in the Attic

    anything by Dick King Smith
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    Jan 15, 2009 8:21 PM GMT
    Haha. Not long ago, I bought the "Complete Curious George" for my niece. But first I had to sit down and read through it myself again.

    I still have my copies of some of Heinlein's juvenile books, like "Spaceship Galileo" and "Have Spacesuit Will Travel."
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    Jan 15, 2009 8:39 PM GMT
    Woo! Memory lane time! icon_biggrin.gif

    Let's see...

    Picture books. The earliest I can remember were several volumes of Disney books with lavishly illustrated pages and labels of things/actions on them. And the usual ABC stuff with illustrations for things that start with a particular letter (I still remember drawing sharks and airplanes on them - my favorite things to draw when I was barely 6).

    Dr. Seuss books. The hop on pop stuff. icon_biggrin.gif

    The 'Sally' books. I never did find out what those books are called officially. But they were old hand me down books from my grandparents, from the war time no less (WW2). You know those books which shows all american kids doing all american stuff like 'Sally has a big red wagon, Billy has a small blue wagon, Billy likes to play bump the wagons with Sally'. icon_lol.gif

    Fairy tales. Grimm's at first. Only later did I really appreciate Andersen's stories (I think they were more targeted at a young adult audience) - one of my favorites of Andersen's is The Marsh King's Daughter. Both were pretty big for me. I read those books to tatters. Then other modernized versions of them, including one with Disney characters.

    Then Edward Lear's limericks. I still remember the owl and the pussycat in the pea green boat. icon_biggrin.gif And that ridiculously inane story about the voyage around the world... I've always wondered what sort of creature Quangle Wangle was (now I suspect it was something racist).

    The illustrated 'modern' classics - The Little Prince, Babar and the Elephants (dunno which book specifically, but it was Babar), Where the Wild Things Are, Animal Farm, Uncle Remus (Brer Rabbit and the like).

    As I grew older, my elder sisters bought me my first Hardy Boys book (something about Mayan pyramids). I got hooked. I got Nancy Drew, Bobsey Twins, and Hardy Boys books. These were the first books that really got me into reading novel-type stories.

    Goosebumps of course. And those weird adventure books where you get choices and you had to skip pages to see what happens next.

    Then real classics (this was when I discovered the school library), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (never did like it much, the slang too difficult for me to understand and the culture too alien back then, but I read it nonetheless, ditto with Tom Sawyer), The Prince & The Pauper, Little Women, The Swiss Family Robinson (even at the age of 12 I realized that the fauna of the island was totally ridiculous), Moby Dick, The Yearling, Heidi... and a shitload of those short stories compilations.

    Also world mythology and legends. Greek and Norse mostly. But pretty much everything I could get my hands on, from American Indian to African to Japanese. One of the books that stand out at this time was the One Thousand and One Nights - not the Aladdin bullcrap but the real deal. It was the first sexually and violently graphic books I've read told in a seemingly fairytale format.

    Heck even poems like The Ancient Mariner, The Green Knight, and The Lady of Shalott, The Song of Hiawatha, etc. were read at this time (Partly because they were included in the English textbooks). This was the period when I was already beginning to become the pretty serious bookworm that I am now - I was around 11-14 and I was already amassing scifi and fantasy books in addition to the 'normal' fare.

    Also being the sexual exploration time... this was also when I sneaked out my sisters' romance novels and read them. icon_redface.gif ROFL

    Two of my favorite authors of all time were read during this period - Rudyard Kipling and Lewis Carroll.

    I love my parents for buying us all the books we could possibly want. icon_smile.gif It's their best gift to us.

    Ok enough rambling. I'm sure I've left out a lot of books. LOL. But I'm getting old. *sigh*

    EDIT: Curious George, yeah! icon_biggrin.gif
  • Timbales

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    Jan 15, 2009 8:43 PM GMT
    The Narnia books, the Oz books, Piers Anthony's Xanth books are a few.
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    Jan 15, 2009 8:47 PM GMT
    I have read the seven books comprising the "Chronicles of Narnia" eight times I think. I still re-read every 5 or 6 years.

    I still read the Hardy Boys books. I finished the original version of "The Disappearing Floor" written in 1940, last night. Very entertaining but the plot made practically no sense. Like one of my nightmares coming to life on the written page. icon_biggrin.gif

    Also the Harry Potter books, but I read them as an adult.

    I did not read that much as a kid which is kind of ironic considering I read over 50 books a year now.
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    Jan 15, 2009 8:53 PM GMT
    Gerald Durrell books
  • joggerva

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    Jan 15, 2009 9:11 PM GMT
    Lloyd Alexander: The Chronicles of Prydain and The Vesper Holly adventures. I loved Vesper Holly - kind of an early Laura Croft. As far as detectives go, she was much cooler than the Hardy Boys. Here's how Alexander describes her: "the digestive talents of a goat and the mind of a chess master. She is familiar with half a dozen languages and can swear in all of them."
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    Jan 15, 2009 11:01 PM GMT
    Jules Verne's adventure classics, Moomintroll series.
  • MattyC0709

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    Jan 15, 2009 11:07 PM GMT
    The Famous Five series by Enid Blyton!

    LOL, I remember I had this small book with pictures of fruit with the name of the fruit written in Maltese underneath the respective picture. One day my younger sister was looking at it and came across a picture of a pomengranate, and she's like "Is that a bum?" Lol, I'll never forget that moment! Hilarious! icon_razz.gif
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    Jan 15, 2009 11:08 PM GMT
    Tuck Everlasting is probably my most favorite book from childhood. Oh, how the tears flowed as that little toad hopped away. I'm gettin' choked up just thinking about it.
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    Jan 15, 2009 11:20 PM GMT
    The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    and
    Don't Ever Wish for a Seven Foot Bear by Robert Benton
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    Jan 15, 2009 11:38 PM GMT
    Sedative said But I'm getting old. *sigh*


    I'm a gonna slap you silly, Eric.

    My father read Alice in Wonderland to me when I was very young, and I think that it was at least half responsible for forming my sense of humor. Anyone who thinks this is a child's book simply hasn't read it.

    I read everything I could get my hands on when I was a kid. Of course, there were no video games then and we lived out in the country, so there wasn't a whole lot else to do (besides tramping around in the woods and chasing foxes to their lairs).

    I read all of the Hardy Boys, the Tolkien books, a lot of Twain, the collected short stories of Somerset Maugham, which were wonderful, and most of them set in the far-flung corners of the British Empire. Maugham is I think very underrated today. It isn't James Joyce but he tells a ripping good story.

    I also read the spy books of John Buchan, an English writer who's really only remembered today for writing the novel The 39 Steps which became one of Hitchcock's best early movies, although the movie borrows exactly nothing from the book except the title.

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    Jan 16, 2009 5:00 AM GMT
    We just had cuneiform stone tablets to read when I was a kid icon_eek.gif

    but now that the the old joke is out of the way,

    Where the wild things are
    A wrinkle in time, A wind in the door, A swiftly tilting planet
    Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH
    Anything Dr Seus
    Who's mouse are you?
    Where the sidewalk ends
    Chronicles of Narnia (got the set when I was 12)

    My dad was a librarian so we had access to tons of book when we were growing up. We also had the weekly reader in grade school so we could order books.
    The above are the ones I read and reread.
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    Jan 16, 2009 5:01 AM GMT
    Ha, too many to recount

    I <3 libraries.
  • MSUBioNerd

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    Jan 16, 2009 5:13 AM GMT
    The Wrinkle in Time series, anything by Edward Eager or Bruce Coville or Dr. Suess, and My Side of the Mountain are the ones I have the fondest memories of from my childhood. There are better children's books which I've read, but I read those after I was no longer really a child and thus can't really count them as childhood memories.
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    Jan 16, 2009 5:15 AM GMT
    Oooohhhh...fun. Some of my particular favorites that are still bouncing around on my shelves are Roxaboxen, Saint George and the Dragon (probably explains my Anglophilia), and the Polar Express. I also loved the Berenstain Bears. The Goosebump books were my bread and butter reading for years, and now my mother has them for her school kids to read. I also remember a lot of elementary school books, particularly Across Five Aprils. I loved that book.
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    Jan 16, 2009 5:23 AM GMT
    Agree with Paradox -- loved Gerald Durell, particularly "My Family and Other Animals" which my grandmother read to me. Also the books in the 'What-a-Mess' series -- for the drawings as much as the story -- about a wayward Afghan puppy, and then loved and still love Asterix and company.
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    Jan 16, 2009 5:36 AM GMT
    Sir Toby Jingle's Beastly Journey

    The Story of Little Black Sambo

    Be Nice To Spiders

    Creepy Susie: and 13 other tragic tales for troubled children

    Where the Sidewalk Ends

    The Ramona series.

    The Sweet Pickles series.

    Babar

    Where the Wild Things Are

    The Velveteen Rabbit

    Island of the Blue Dolphins

    James and the Giant Peach

    White Fang

    Daybreak 2250 AD
  • Timbales

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    Jan 16, 2009 12:26 PM GMT
    I love James and the Giant Peach and Where The Wild Things Are.
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    Jan 16, 2009 12:45 PM GMT
    Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH
    Bridge to Terabithia
    Ramona the Pest
    Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing
    A Light in the Attic
    Where the Sidewalk Ends

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    Jan 16, 2009 3:09 PM GMT
    I still have my hardback version of "Go Dog Go" from when I was a small boy.

    "Lord of the Flies" remains my favorite book of boyhood...well, even manhood...
  • lifeat84

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    Jan 16, 2009 3:36 PM GMT
    I too was a Goosbumps fan, had them all. Also was obsessed with Animorphs, Magic: The Gathering, Narnia, Star Trek, The Bobbsey Twins, The Hardy Boys, and of course all the choose your own adventure books, and my first encounter with a savant... Encyclopedia Brown, lol...i think that gives a good show of what types of books i read time and again up until high school... of course there were less favorites...Gullivers Travels being read to me by my big brother...Dr. Seuss to start out with...OH! and the Berenstain Bears were the first books i could read on my own...

    Do I get a gold star now?
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:12 PM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite -
    Little Black Sambo is a classic...and you may by the ONLY other person I have encountered who is familiar with it. haha
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:13 PM GMT
    lifeat84 saidI too was a Goosbumps fan, had them all. Also was obsessed with Animorphs, Magic: The Gathering, Narnia, Star Trek, The Bobbsey Twins, The Hardy Boys, and of course all the choose your own adventure books, and my first encounter with a savant... Encyclopedia Brown, lol...i think that gives a good show of what types of books i read time and again up until high school... of course there were less favorites...Gullivers Travels being read to me by my big brother...Dr. Seuss to start out with...OH! and the Berenstain Bears were the first books i could read on my own...

    Do I get a gold star now?


    you get the the gold star if you still have all the goosebumps icon_razz.gif