Tums/Ant-Acids Can Cause Tooth Decay

  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Oct 13, 2014 7:09 PM GMT
    if you don't rinse out your mouth with warm water after chewing. Just read the ingredients on the label - The largest ingredient in the Tums tablet is sucrose (common table sugar). So chewing one is just like chewing hard candy - not something one would want to do before going to bed without rinsing. You would think they would warn us.
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    Oct 13, 2014 7:13 PM GMT
    and this is a thread why exactly? carbohydrates digested by bacteria end up as acids that makes demineralisation of hydroxyapatite, which is the main mineral compound in enamel, if the ph drops below 5.5, that leads to tooth decay, nothing newsworthy about that
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Oct 13, 2014 8:07 PM GMT
    I'm not sure where you're getting that sucrose is the main ingredient, since medicine ingredients are listed first by active/inactive, then by amount. If you look on the official Tums website, sucrose is listed a second-to-last inactive ingredient, right before talc, for both Tums flavors.

    Drinking orange juice, soda, eating acidic fruits, etc. also all decay enamel and can eventually cause mineral loss. I think the antacid benefit of Tums (since acid reflux can result in esophageal damage that can be life-changing) could outweigh the risk of having it on your teeth at night. Besides, who wants that chalky taste in their mouth before bed? Best take it and then brush your teeth.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Oct 13, 2014 9:20 PM GMT
    They really do have a lot of sugar in them. Each tablet contains:

    Active ingredient - calcium carbonate - 1 gram

    Sucrose - 1.5 grams

    (And it does taste sweet enough to overpower a chalky taste)

    I had always assumed the sweetness was from an artificial sweetener - not from sugar.
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    Oct 14, 2014 2:02 AM GMT
    If you're eating so many Tums that your teeth rot, you have a much bigger problem.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Oct 14, 2014 2:16 AM GMT
    I agree a warning/advisory is in order IF what you say, scientifically, is true.

    But from a practical standpoint: who eats tums in the first place? And of those Tums poppers, who does it before bed? I only brush my teeth 2 to 3 times a day. Do people actually brush and/or rinse more than that?
  • Wyatt

    Posts: 239

    Oct 14, 2014 4:52 AM GMT
    Even if there were relatively large concentrations of sugars in Tums (which there probably is for flavoring), all sugar and carbohydrates cause demineralisation of enamel, I don't understand what you are confused about.
  • Wyatt

    Posts: 239

    Oct 14, 2014 4:57 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidI'm not sure where you're getting that sucrose is the main ingredient, since medicine ingredients are listed first by active/inactive, then by amount. If you look on the official Tums website, sucrose is listed a second-to-last inactive ingredient, right before talc, for both Tums flavors.

    Drinking orange juice, soda, eating acidic fruits, etc. also all decay enamel and can eventually cause mineral loss. I think the antacid benefit of Tums (since acid reflux can result in esophageal damage that can be life-changing) could outweigh the risk of having it on your teeth at night. Besides, who wants that chalky taste in their mouth before bed? Best take it and then brush your teeth.


    You're wrong about the ant-acid side of things. An ant-acid usually contains a compound similar to calcium carbonate, which, when reacted with hydrochloric acid (HCl, stomach acid), produces a neutral salt and a pH buffer, to limit how high or low the pH can go; when you're experiencing acid reflux, the acid from your stomach isn't bathing your teeth, it stops in your esophagus.

    The reason demineralisation of enamel occurs, is due to microbes living on your teeth and gums. One of the metabolic by-products microbes produce is acid - it's this acid that actually leads to the demineralisation of tooth enamel; not stomach acid.

    All the sugars you digest can be metabolized by the microbes in your mouth - which produces acid. In addition, amylase, the enzyme in your saliva responsible for catalyzing the breakdown of carbohydrates, converts carbohydrates into their monomers- sugar. This sugar from the carbohydrates also is metabolized by the microbes in your mouth, and more acid is produced.

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    Oct 14, 2014 5:40 AM GMT
    Wyatt said
    Bunjamon saidI'm not sure where you're getting that sucrose is the main ingredient, since medicine ingredients are listed first by active/inactive, then by amount. If you look on the official Tums website, sucrose is listed a second-to-last inactive ingredient, right before talc, for both Tums flavors.

    Drinking orange juice, soda, eating acidic fruits, etc. also all decay enamel and can eventually cause mineral loss. I think the antacid benefit of Tums (since acid reflux can result in esophageal damage that can be life-changing) could outweigh the risk of having it on your teeth at night. Besides, who wants that chalky taste in their mouth before bed? Best take it and then brush your teeth.


    You're wrong about the ant-acid side of things. An ant-acid usually contains a compound similar to calcium carbonate, which, when reacted with hydrochloric acid (HCl, stomach acid), produces a neutral salt and a pH buffer, to limit how high or low the pH can go; when you're experiencing acid reflux, the acid from your stomach isn't bathing your teeth, it stops in your esophagus.

    The reason demineralisation of enamel occurs, is due to microbes living on your teeth and gums. One of the metabolic by-products microbes produce is acid - it's this acid that actually leads to the demineralisation of tooth enamel; not stomach acid.

    All the sugars you digest can be metabolized by the microbes in your mouth - which produces acid. In addition, amylase, the enzyme in your saliva responsible for catalyzing the breakdown of carbohydrates, converts carbohydrates into their monomers- sugar. This sugar from the carbohydrates also is metabolized by the microbes in your mouth, and more acid is produced.



    You are not quite right about the demineralisation processes in the mouth, it occurs for multiple reasons, not just because of bacteria and metabolism, quite common reason for it to happen is pure acidity that can come from acidic foods like apple, orange juice, grapefruit juice, also reflux can cause the process, erosions from acidic foods are common, acidic substances where ph drops below 5,5 can cause demineralisation without presence of bacteria, when buffer system is turned to acidic processes

    About bacteria, lactic acid is the one responsible for demineralisation of enamel, but it is only part of the problem, quite important reason is forming the plaque on the teeth, which forms mainly due to str mutans, bacteria has an enzyme that binds glucose together forming dextran-based polysaccharide that allows them to cohere, forming plaque.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 14, 2014 8:10 PM GMT
    Just avoid taking pills with multiple ingredients. A very effective acid neutralizing compound is sodium hydroxide (NaOH); it is guaranteed to neutralize stomach acid very effectively, although its other effects may mitigate against its use.
  • Wyatt

    Posts: 239

    Oct 14, 2014 9:33 PM GMT
    Bonapart said
    Wyatt said
    Bunjamon saidI'm not sure where you're getting that sucrose is the main ingredient, since medicine ingredients are listed first by active/inactive, then by amount. If you look on the official Tums website, sucrose is listed a second-to-last inactive ingredient, right before talc, for both Tums flavors.

    Drinking orange juice, soda, eating acidic fruits, etc. also all decay enamel and can eventually cause mineral loss. I think the antacid benefit of Tums (since acid reflux can result in esophageal damage that can be life-changing) could outweigh the risk of having it on your teeth at night. Besides, who wants that chalky taste in their mouth before bed? Best take it and then brush your teeth.


    You're wrong about the ant-acid side of things. An ant-acid usually contains a compound similar to calcium carbonate, which, when reacted with hydrochloric acid (HCl, stomach acid), produces a neutral salt and a pH buffer, to limit how high or low the pH can go; when you're experiencing acid reflux, the acid from your stomach isn't bathing your teeth, it stops in your esophagus.

    The reason demineralisation of enamel occurs, is due to microbes living on your teeth and gums. One of the metabolic by-products microbes produce is acid - it's this acid that actually leads to the demineralisation of tooth enamel; not stomach acid.

    All the sugars you digest can be metabolized by the microbes in your mouth - which produces acid. In addition, amylase, the enzyme in your saliva responsible for catalyzing the breakdown of carbohydrates, converts carbohydrates into their monomers- sugar. This sugar from the carbohydrates also is metabolized by the microbes in your mouth, and more acid is produced.



    You are not quite right about the demineralisation processes in the mouth, it occurs for multiple reasons, not just because of bacteria and metabolism, quite common reason for it to happen is pure acidity that can come from acidic foods like apple, orange juice, grapefruit juice, also reflux can cause the process, erosions from acidic foods are common, acidic substances where ph drops below 5,5 can cause demineralisation without presence of bacteria, when buffer system is turned to acidic processes

    About bacteria, lactic acid is the one responsible for demineralisation of enamel, but it is only part of the problem, quite important reason is forming the plaque on the teeth, which forms mainly due to str mutans, bacteria has an enzyme that binds glucose together forming dextran-based polysaccharide that allows them to cohere, forming plaque.


    Well obviously carbohydrate fermentation isn't the only reason for tooth decay; I was simply responding specifically to what Benjamon wrote.

    I'm not wrong, I was just stating that stomach acid isn't the issue, and added an example of where other sources of acid may come from that isn't as obvious as acids coming from citrus fruit, and carbonated beverages etc.

    To add to what you said, as the bacteria in the 'plaque' secrete extra-cellular polymeric substances, it forms a biofilm, which in turn protects the microbes from various methods used to control microbial growth and can increase the rate of bacterial conjugation, so microbes with str resistance genes for example can share those genes more easily with other bacteria within the biofilm.
  • TheSkyWasYell...

    Posts: 310

    Oct 16, 2014 8:24 PM GMT
    Well, interestingly calcium carbonate is an antacid and I remember hearing the digestive tract needs to be acidic in order to digest calcium. Which is why the acidic calcium citrate digests better than the alkaline calcium carbonate. If that theory is correct, then taking calcium carbonate ends up depriving you of calcium by limiting its digestion.
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    Oct 17, 2014 2:18 AM GMT
    Wyatt said
    Bonapart said
    Wyatt said
    Bunjamon saidI'm not sure where you're getting that sucrose is the main ingredient, since medicine ingredients are listed first by active/inactive, then by amount. If you look on the official Tums website, sucrose is listed a second-to-last inactive ingredient, right before talc, for both Tums flavors.

    Drinking orange juice, soda, eating acidic fruits, etc. also all decay enamel and can eventually cause mineral loss. I think the antacid benefit of Tums (since acid reflux can result in esophageal damage that can be life-changing) could outweigh the risk of having it on your teeth at night. Besides, who wants that chalky taste in their mouth before bed? Best take it and then brush your teeth.


    You're wrong about the ant-acid side of things. An ant-acid usually contains a compound similar to calcium carbonate, which, when reacted with hydrochloric acid (HCl, stomach acid), produces a neutral salt and a pH buffer, to limit how high or low the pH can go; when you're experiencing acid reflux, the acid from your stomach isn't bathing your teeth, it stops in your esophagus.

    The reason demineralisation of enamel occurs, is due to microbes living on your teeth and gums. One of the metabolic by-products microbes produce is acid - it's this acid that actually leads to the demineralisation of tooth enamel; not stomach acid.

    All the sugars you digest can be metabolized by the microbes in your mouth - which produces acid. In addition, amylase, the enzyme in your saliva responsible for catalyzing the breakdown of carbohydrates, converts carbohydrates into their monomers- sugar. This sugar from the carbohydrates also is metabolized by the microbes in your mouth, and more acid is produced.



    You are not quite right about the demineralisation processes in the mouth, it occurs for multiple reasons, not just because of bacteria and metabolism, quite common reason for it to happen is pure acidity that can come from acidic foods like apple, orange juice, grapefruit juice, also reflux can cause the process, erosions from acidic foods are common, acidic substances where ph drops below 5,5 can cause demineralisation without presence of bacteria, when buffer system is turned to acidic processes

    About bacteria, lactic acid is the one responsible for demineralisation of enamel, but it is only part of the problem, quite important reason is forming the plaque on the teeth, which forms mainly due to str mutans, bacteria has an enzyme that binds glucose together forming dextran-based polysaccharide that allows them to cohere, forming plaque.


    Well obviously carbohydrate fermentation isn't the only reason for tooth decay; I was simply responding specifically to what Benjamon wrote.

    I'm not wrong, I was just stating that stomach acid isn't the issue, and added an example of where other sources of acid may come from that isn't as obvious as acids coming from citrus fruit, and carbonated beverages etc.

    To add to what you said, as the bacteria in the 'plaque' secrete extra-cellular polymeric substances, it forms a biofilm, which in turn protects the microbes from various methods used to control microbial growth and can increase the rate of bacterial conjugation, so microbes with str resistance genes for example can share those genes more easily with other bacteria within the biofilm.


    Actually people with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) DO get stomach contents refluxing up past there esophagus. It can cause voice changes from irritation the larynx, chronic cough from being aspirated into the lungs, and can get into the mouth and cause tooth decay.
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    Oct 17, 2014 2:20 AM GMT
    If you're consistently popping Tums then you should look into getting a lap Nissen done. It's a procedure to correct a lax lower esophageal sphincter. Keeps stomach contents from refluxing up.