Being affectionate in a foreign language

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 14, 2014 12:25 AM GMT
    I'll be living in Montreal next year but I'm afraid my Brazilian tenderness will go down the drain because I don't know how to translate some very idiomatic resources available in my language that don't seem to exist in either French or English.

    In Portuguese and Spanish, it is a common practice to add a diminutive suffix to convey tenderness, fondness, warmth and oftentimes just for "cutefying" any word you want.

    Some examples, in ascending order of cuteness... icon_lol.gif

    Portuguese | English

    Urso - Bear
    Ursinho - Teddy bear / Cub
    Ursinho fofo - Fluffy teddy bear
    Ursinho fofinho - Super fluffy teddy bear
    Ursinho fofuchinho - Super cutey fluffy teddy bear icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

    My last lover's nickname was "fofucho" (I don't dare to translate :lolicon_smile.gif and he was quite fond of it!

    I'm going to lose all that lovey-dovey sugar when I communicate with Canadians. icon_sad.gif

    - Can anyone provide a lovey-dovey vocabulary in English or French? Don't be afraid to sound ridiculous... this is ridiculous by definition icon_lol.gif

    - Would you mind if your foreign lover gave you a foreign nickname? Something ending with -ito (Spanish) or -inho (Portuguese)?

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    Oct 14, 2014 12:28 AM GMT
    gorgeous
    stunning
    cute
    hot
    sexy
    attractive
    handsome
    appealing
    admirable
    beauteous
    charming
    classy
    dazzling
    delightful
    divine
    elegant
    enticing
    alluring
    exquisite
    excellent
    fair
    fascinating
    fine
    foxy
    good-looking
    grand
    lovely
    magnificent
    marvelous
    ravishing
    sightly
    shapely
    statuesque
    well-formed
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    Oct 14, 2014 1:47 AM GMT
    Thank you kevex. I thought there would be something more idiomatic and warm in your language. These sound like they came straight from the dictionary and it's not the kind of thing I would whisper in my lover's ears at night...
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    Oct 14, 2014 1:49 AM GMT
    I speak Spanish.
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    Oct 14, 2014 1:53 AM GMT
    What about these:

    Sugar
    Baby
    Pumpkin
    Angel
    Boo
    Honey
    Cuddle-bear
    Hot-Stuff
    Honey bun
    Chuchuzinho



    Sorry, I'm not a very sweet person.
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    Oct 14, 2014 1:58 AM GMT
    ROFL!!! icon_lol.gif

    These sound a lot more fluffy icon_razz.gif
  • spitfire

    Posts: 34

    Oct 14, 2014 2:55 AM GMT
    You don't have to be too worried, lots of Montréalers can speak or understand a fair bit of Spanish or Portuguese, so it won't be lost on them entirely. Plus, you can still use those words even if they don't understand, some people like cute pet names even if they're not in English. You'll be fine.
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    Oct 14, 2014 8:19 AM GMT
    I think in English there is certain limitation on "cutefying" existing words. All the latin languages come with diminutives which makes latin words sound cuter, but there isn't anything similar like that in English. So you can use excessive amount of honey or baby in every sentence, which I think would make you sound cheesy. Still you can sell yourself with your brazilian accent. From what I have read on forums around here, native English speakers dig that very much.
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    Oct 14, 2014 2:51 PM GMT
    You answered your own question when you used the words lovey and dovey and teddy (a diminutive of Theodore or Ted).

    Sweetie
    Cutie
    Poopie
    Sweet patootie
    Pookie

    English is the most flexible language there is when it comes to creating words.

    I'm not fond of cutesy - my Sexican sometimes puts -cito at the end of my name. I'd rather he rattle off some rapid fire dirty spanish when we are having hot sex.

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    Oct 14, 2014 3:20 PM GMT
    I use goober or goob with my partner. Because he is. Or, adding a tacky food in front of their name. Like, "Pizza Dave, how you feeling?" I'm also not very socially adept. Forcing names is hard, if you use what ever flows naturally for you, the lover knows the intent and it's cute/special between the two.
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    Oct 14, 2014 3:52 PM GMT
    I just moved to Montréal from the states.

    There are a lot of Latinos here. Mexicans, Columbians and Cubans are mostly what I've met.

    And if you say it the right way anyone will understand your intent.
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    Oct 14, 2014 3:56 PM GMT
    The "cutifyings" you speak of are more properly referred to as diminutives, and they exist in French, German, and Italian as well, usually with suffixes such as ette, chen, and ino, respectively. There are lots more, and suffixes that can magnify as well, to indicate, for example, greatness of size. Hopefully, you can combine - and use - them to good effect.
  • secondstartot...

    Posts: 1314

    Oct 14, 2014 6:22 PM GMT
    English has got to be , one of the most unromantic languages in the world...half the point of dating or sleeping with a hot foreigner is that he calls you all cute things in his really much cuter language ...like if you had to call me your "Ursinho fofo " I would probably just melt !!!!icon_wink.gif
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 14, 2014 7:51 PM GMT
    bachian saidThank you kevex. I thought there would be something more idiomatic and warm in your language. These sound like they came straight from the dictionary and it's not the kind of thing I would whisper in my lover's ears at night...


    They were alphabetized in several groups so probably they were lifted from some lists, but there is nothing wrong with that.
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    Oct 14, 2014 10:49 PM GMT
    Many of my friends have told me that Québécois love Spanish-speakers. I don't think you'll have much problems in Montréal.
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    Oct 15, 2014 3:45 AM GMT
    A couple of these guys are right - you are looking for what is called diminutives. In English, we tend to favor "ie" or "y" at the end of a word to make it "cute", but there are "pet names" as well.

    cutie, sweetie, are examples of the suffix
    snookums, honey bear, pookie are special words

    Why not make up your own? Many people do.

    And frankly, if you spoke to me in Portuguese, or English with a Portuguese accent, I'd melt in your arms. No need to worry about the words.
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    Oct 15, 2014 3:53 AM GMT
    All I know is that the OP is sizzling. Fuxy icon_redface.gif
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    Oct 15, 2014 8:22 AM GMT
    bachian saidI'll be living in Montreal next year but I'm afraid my Brazilian tenderness will go down the drain because I don't know how to translate some very idiomatic resources available in my language that don't seem to exist in either French or English.

    In Portuguese and Spanish, it is a common practice to add a diminutive suffix to convey tenderness, fondness, warmth and oftentimes just for "cutefying" any word you want.

    Some examples, in ascending order of cuteness... icon_lol.gif

    Portuguese | English

    Urso - Bear
    Ursinho - Teddy bear / Cub
    Ursinho fofo - Fluffy teddy bear
    Ursinho fofinho - Super fluffy teddy bear
    Ursinho fofuchinho - Super cutey fluffy teddy bear icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

    My last lover's nickname was "fofucho" (I don't dare to translate :lolicon_smile.gif and he was quite fond of it!

    I'm going to lose all that lovey-dovey sugar when I communicate with Canadians. icon_sad.gif

    - Can anyone provide a lovey-dovey vocabulary in English or French? Don't be afraid to sound ridiculous... this is ridiculous by definition icon_lol.gif

    - Would you mind if your foreign lover gave you a foreign nickname? Something ending with -ito (Spanish) or -inho (Portuguese)?



    I just looked at your profile. You write so well. I have no doubt that you will express yourself just fine.

    I lived in a non-English-speaking country for a while and had some romantic escapades...honestly, earnestness translates well in any language, regardless of the specific vocabulary used. Even if you end up saying something ridiculous like "my tall special friend" (this happened) - if you are genuine, the words won't matter.
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    Oct 15, 2014 8:41 AM GMT
    Not that fond of foreign languages, but I do swoon at a Scottish accent.
    At least a toned down and understandable one lol but yeah I love those.
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    Oct 15, 2014 8:52 PM GMT
    In German, the translation for Liebchen is "little love"