Transferring Canker Sore from your Mouth to your Penis

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2009 10:33 PM GMT
    Guy A has a canker sore inside his mouth. Guy B makes out with Guy A, exchanging saliva and then Guy B gives Guy A a blow job without using a condom.

    Has Guy A's penis been exposed to the pathogens that have caused the canker sore in his mouth? Will he get sores on his penis now?
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    Jan 16, 2009 12:25 AM GMT
    Canker sores found inside the mouth aren't contagious. They're caused by injury or trauma to the lining of the mouth, tongue, gums. They can also be caused by stress, or allergies. I don't think they are linked to virus (like cold sores are ie. Herpes). Guy A shouldn't develop any sores on his dick unless Guy B has herpes or other nasty microbes he's shedding (eventhough he has no obvious signs or symptoms of infection). If both guys are monogamous, faithful and are free of STIs then nothing should happen.

    For your safety though, don't have oral sex including kissing if you have an open sore like a canker sore. It might be an easy route for virus (such as HIV) or bacteria to infect you. Wait until it heals!!!!



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    Jan 16, 2009 12:26 AM GMT
    I think that I understand it correctly, but if I am mistaken, by all means correct me.

    If you have the herpes virus in your mouth, and you give some guy a blowjob and successfully transfer herpes to him, the first outbreak will appear in their genital area, but subsequent breakouts will appear in their mouth.

    In contrast, if a guy has genital herpes, and you blow him and contract herpes, the first outbreak will appear in your mouth, and then subsequent outbreaks will appear in your genital area.

    I believe that is how it goes.

    EDIT:

    As far as I have been able to find, I am incorrect about the transfer from the sight of infection. Most reputable websites state that you can get genital herpes from someone who has the disease in their mouth.
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    Jan 16, 2009 12:29 AM GMT
    Herpes simplex is a viral disease caused by Herpes simplex viruses; both herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) cause herpes simplex. Infection with the herpes virus is categorized into one of several distinct disorders based on the site of infection. Oral herpes, the visible symptoms of which are colloquially called cold sores, infects the face and mouth. Oral herpes is the most common form of infection. Infection of the genitals, commonly known as herpes, is the second most common form of herpes. Other disorders such as herpetic whitlow, herpes gladiatorum, ocular herpes (keratitis), cerebral herpes infection encephalitis, Mollaret's meningitis, neonatal herpes, and possibly Bell's palsy are all caused by herpes simplex viruses.

    Herpes viruses cycle between periods of active disease—presenting as blisters containing infectious virus particles—that last 2–21 days, followed by a remission period, during which the sores disappear. Genital herpes, however, is often asymptomatic, though viral shedding may still occur. After initial infection, the viruses move to sensory nerves, where they reside as life-long, latent viruses. Causes of recurrence are uncertain, though some potential triggers have been identified. Over time episodes of active disease reduce in frequency.

    Herpes simplex is most easily transmitted by direct contact with a lesion or the body fluid of an infected individual. Transmission may also occur through skin-to-skin contact during periods of asymptomatic shedding. Barrier protection methods are the most reliable, but not failsafe, method of preventing transmission of herpes. Oral herpes is easily diagnosed if the patient presents with visible sores or ulcers. Early stages of orofacial herpes and genital herpes are harder to diagnose; laboratory testing is usually required. Prevalence of HSV infections varies throughout the world. Poor hygiene, overcrowding, lower socioeconomic status, and birth in an undeveloped country have been identified as risk factors associated with increased HSV-1 childhood infection. Additional studies have identified other risk factors for both types of HSV.

    There is currently no cure for herpes; no vaccine is currently available to prevent or eliminate herpes. However, treatments are available to reduce viral reproduction and shedding, prevent the virus from entering the skin, and alleviate the severity of symptomatic episodes.

    I took time to google this for the poster.

    Find more reading here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes
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    Jan 16, 2009 12:32 AM GMT
    I dug further for the poster, here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canker_sore

    An aphthous ulcer (aka canker sore) is a type of oral ulcer which presents as a painful open sore inside the mouth or upper throat, caused by a break in the mucous membrane. The condition is also known as aphthous stomatitis, and alternatively as Sutton's Disease, especially in the case of multiple or recurring ulcers.

    The term aphtha means ulcer; it has been used for many years to describe areas of ulceration on mucous membranes. Aphthous stomatitis is a condition which is characterized by recurrent discrete areas of ulceration which are almost always painful. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) can be distinguished from other diseases with similar-appearing oral lesions, such as certain viral exanthems or Herpes simplex, by their tendency to recur, and their multiplicity and chronicity. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is one of the most common oral conditions. At least 10% of the population suffers from it. Women are more often affected than men. About 30–40% of patients with recurrent aphthae report a family history.[1]

    Never forget the wonderful resource at your fingertips: The Internet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 1:33 AM GMT
    Chucky, neither of your quotes really answer the OPs question. And wikipedia is not really an appropriate source...
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    Jan 16, 2009 1:47 AM GMT
    I would not be consulting wikipedia for health advice.
    In undergrad, I had an entire course about pathogens, viruses, and such. Canker sores do not spread from contact whether it be mouth to mouth or mouth to penis...think of them sort of as a zit. You can't catch someone else's acne.

    A canker sore is an open sore though, so it is entirely possible to get something else that actually is contagious or prevent the canker sore from actually healing.

    Everyone gets em, mostly from stress or even from biting the side of your cheeks or inside if your lips.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 1:50 AM GMT
    YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 2:03 AM GMT
    i think guy B may have had something! guy A may want to get checked out.....cause as far as i know crank sores cant be passed....howvever iam not a doctor!
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Jan 16, 2009 2:06 AM GMT
    surfsdown saidChucky, neither of your quotes really answer the OPs question. And wikipedia is not really an appropriate source...



    actually studies have shown that wikipedia is something like 90+% reliable.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 2:20 AM GMT
    Threads like this make me VERY AFRAID to kiss anyone. I'll need a female condom for my mouth now icon_sad.gif

    JUST KIDDING.

    SCARY STUFF. I know its hard to be safe when you're out and about and under the influence of drinks or drugs or just plain strong hormones. I'm am so glad I have been safe. You just never know and the chance is too great to risk it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 2:36 AM GMT
    canker sores are not contagious, so there should be no worry about getting any of those. However, if it was something else, then they should both get tested as it could be herpes of some sort.
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    Jan 16, 2009 2:42 AM GMT
    Does this mean I can't blow myself when i have a cancer sore now?
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    Jan 16, 2009 3:04 AM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite saidDoes this mean I can't blow myself when i have a cancer sore now?


    Wouldn't it depend on where your cancer sore is?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 3:52 AM GMT
    Can you get STDs orally? You bet. Is Wikipedia accurate in a way that most folks can understand? You bet. Can you get HIV, herpes, warts, hepatitis, and about any other disease via fluids from the mouth or wherever? Of course. I should have quoted the CDC for those complainers (notice they did not cite sources, nor answer the question, but, rather, chose to bang on me.)

    Here:

    http://www.cdc.gov/std/Herpes/default.htm

    Here:
    http://www.cdc.gov/std/Herpes/the-facts/default.htm


    Here:

    http://www.cdc.gov/std/Trends2000/herpes.htm

    I encourage the poster to utilize the resources of The Internet to do discovery on their own.

    There is a WEALTH of information at your fingertips. Google is good starting point.

    You should never forget that sex is a raw activity with inherent risk even in the best situations. Is your likelihood high that you'll get HIV from a BJ? No, but, it DOES happen.

    It's best to research this in a deep way, and in a scientific way, and to not depend on the guy next door. It could save your life, or quality of life.

    Just about everyone has the lesser form of Herpes.

    Understand, though, anytime someone places a bare penis in your behind, or a mouth someplace, there are fluids, and all that goes with that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:09 AM GMT
    There are two main reasons not to use Wikipedia:

    1) The content is dynamic and ever-changing. This means there is no reliable paper-trail in regards to citing sources;

    2) Content may be falsified, as the site allows users to add and edit content with little to no guarantee of peer review.

    This, however, does not mean you should push Wikipedia aside as you can use it as a starting point. Much of the content includes cited sources making Wikipedia considerably valuable in locating source documents.

    As a rule of thumb, no statement should be taken as fact if it does not have a source; generally, the falsified information on Wikipedia will not have a source attached.

    Ironically, the very things that make Wikipedia a bad source also make it incredibly powerful and valuable: the data is almost always up to date, and there's almost always a way to prove or disprove the validity of the information in an article. Wikipedia's just a bad idea in general for research papers because there's no guarantee your quoted Wikipedia source will still be there when your teacher grades the paper.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:11 AM GMT

    I wasn't saying anything to slam anyone, however the question was not about STDs. Canker sores are NOT a form of any STD and are not contagious or communicable.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:11 AM GMT
    Good thing we're not in high school.

    Refer to the information on canker sores.

    Enough said.
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:37 AM GMT
    Canker Sores: What Are They and What Can You Do About Them?

    What are canker sores?
    Canker sores are shallow, painful sores in the mouth. They are usually red or may sometimes have a white coating over them. You might get them on the inside of your lips, the insides of your cheeks, the base of your gums or under your tongue. Canker sores are different from fever blisters, which usually are on the outside of your lips or the corners of your mouth.

    Anyone can get canker sores, but women and people in their teens and 20s get them more often. Canker sores may run in families, but they aren't contagious. Doctors don't know what causes canker sores, but they may be triggered by stress, poor nutrition, food allergies and menstrual periods.

    How are canker sores treated?
    Canker sores usually go away without any treatment. For pain relief, you can try taking ibuprofen (brand name: Advil) or acetaminophen (brand name: Tylenol). Other medicines, such as Anbesol, Orajel, Orabase and Zilactin-B, might keep your canker sores from becoming irritated by eating, drinking or brushing your teeth. These medicines are applied directly on the sore.

    You can also mix equal amounts of Milk of Magnesia and Benadryl Allergy liquid. After it's mixed, you can swish a teaspoonful in your mouth for about 1 minute and then spit it out. If you do this every 4 to 6 hours, your canker sores may hurt less.

    Some people think that sucking on zinc lozenges, taking vitamin C or vitamin B complex, using a sage-and-chamomile mouthwash or taking a lysine supplement helps their canker sores heal faster.

    http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/articles/613.html
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    Jan 16, 2009 4:48 AM GMT
    You have to love webmd, familydoctor, and so on.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Jan 16, 2009 11:46 AM GMT
    CINCYMSN08 saidCanker sores are HSV-I (oral herpes) and genital herpes are HSV-II. It's possible to transfer HSV-I to the genital areas. They are the same virus, but are different in areas of outbreak and severity. Get a blood test for both types of viruses. You can be positive for both even if you haven't had an outbreak. Also, whoever you're talking about tell them to get a syphilis test too.


    You're thinking cold sores. Canker sores are not HSV-1 and are not an STD.
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    Jan 16, 2009 1:13 PM GMT
    they are called STIs now.. STI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    sorry, just bothers me..

    but yes i'll repeat.. canker sores are non-contagious.. they aren't virus's and are generally caused by irritation.
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    Jan 16, 2009 3:33 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidI dug further for the poster, here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canker_sore

    An aphthous ulcer (aka canker sore) is a type of oral ulcer which presents as a painful open sore inside the mouth or upper throat, caused by a break in the mucous membrane. The condition is also known as aphthous stomatitis, and alternatively as Sutton's Disease, especially in the case of multiple or recurring ulcers.

    The term aphtha means ulcer; it has been used for many years to describe areas of ulceration on mucous membranes. Aphthous stomatitis is a condition which is characterized by recurrent discrete areas of ulceration which are almost always painful. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) can be distinguished from other diseases with similar-appearing oral lesions, such as certain viral exanthems or Herpes simplex, by their tendency to recur, and their multiplicity and chronicity. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is one of the most common oral conditions. At least 10% of the population suffers from it. Women are more often affected than men. About 30–40% of patients with recurrent aphthae report a family history.[1]

    Never forget the wonderful resource at your fingertips: The Internet.


    Although wikipedia is not always accurate, in terms of my experiences with stomatitis and with cold sores, Chucky's seems correct.

    I have suffered from both stomatitis and cold sores nearly my whole life. Especially during periods of high stress (frequent in my childhood, teen years and early 20s). Almost always right after exams. Stomatitis is especially horrible (not being able to eat because you have a mouth full of cankers is very unpleasant, although an effective way to diet).

    I personally would not let someone give me a blowjob who has cuts in his mouth. You don't know for sure what caused the cuts/cankers, so that could result in the penis being infected, and secondly the guy giving the blowjob is at greater risk for getting a STI through entry into the bloodstream. That is likely how got infected with HIV (pre-cum into cut). If a blowjob is on the sex menu put a condom on the cock.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2009 7:55 AM GMT
    As someone who has suffered from Canker Sores since well before I ever even thought about sex, I can tell you that they are absolutely not and STI, STD, whatever.

    But... like many others who have posted said. If you have one, it's best to not perform oral sex and to consider how deeply you really want to kiss someone because you are much more susceptible to any and every virus, bacteria, bug out there. But you're not going to pick up someone's canker sore.

    Now some advice if you suffer from Canker Sores.

    CHANGE YOUR TOOTHPASTE!
    Most toothpastes contain Sodium Laurel Sulfate - a detergent used in everything from laundry detergent to common soaps. For those of us with sensitive mouths, SLS is a leading culprit in causing canker sores.

    I switched to a toothpaste without SLS and my canker sore occurances droped by at least 80%, I hardly ever get them now.... visiting the dentist has been much nicer (not as much scraping and/or cavities), and there's no more foaming at the mouth when I brush. Clean and minty. :-)

    I use a toothpaste called Biotene and I couldn't recommend it more. AT $6 a tube, though, it's pricey but worth it.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2009 2:04 PM GMT
    Canker Sores are NOT Herpes/Cold Sores