does aerobic sessions cause a cortisol-releasing process?

  • cowboyupnorth

    Posts: 264

    Jan 16, 2009 2:07 AM GMT
    I was reading an article (http://www.askmen.com/sports/bodybuilding_100/131_fitness_tip.html) on circuit training and it said, that if you were to perform long aerobic sessions, your testosterone level would drop and you would start to release cortisol (which causes the body to break down muscle tissue) If this is true how much time is required to start this cortisol-releasing process?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 4:31 AM GMT
    I'll save you the googling: you're best to keep your aerobic and cardio exercise down to 20 minutes a session and you're better-off using those 20 minutes doing HIIT (google it).

    The human body is built for relatively short sprints, not for distance.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 4:35 AM GMT
    In search of FOOD...MEAT, and stuff.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 6:10 AM GMT
    YES.. aerobic/cardio/oxidative promotes fat storage and release of insulin/glucocorticoids.

    glucocorticoids-inhibits or retards amino acid incorporation into proteins,maintains normal blood sugar level, conserves glucose and promotes fat storage.

    You want to train in the glycogen-anaerboic and anaerobic atp-cp energy systems.
    This is why cardio freaks never lose fat ,yes they do lose weight from water and muscle but not from fat.
    Muscle consumes the most amount of calories therefore the body goes after them first when doing cardio/oxidative workouts.

    atp-cp/anaerobic lasts about 10 seconds then the glycogen/anaerobic system kicks in and lasts about 30-50 secs.

    same concept for doing high reps low weight to get ripped. (also a myth!!!) cause it will work you into the glycogen/aerobic system which is greater than 2 mins of time.

    I've been talking about this for quite sometime on here but people still insist that ''cardio'' burns fat ..again which is a myth icon_smile.gif



    hope this helps



  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 7:57 AM GMT
    RealMasc saidYES.. aerobic/cardio/oxidative promotes fat storage and release of insulin/glucocorticoids.

    glucocorticoids-inhibits or retards amino acid incorporation into proteins,maintains normal blood sugar level, conserves glucose and promotes fat storage.

    You want to train in the glycogen-anaerboic and anaerobic atp-cp energy systems.
    This is why cardio freaks never lose fat ,yes they do lose weight from water and muscle but not from fat.
    Muscle consumes the most amount of calories therefore the body goes after them first when doing cardio/oxidative workouts.

    atp-cp/anaerobic lasts about 10 seconds then the glycogen/anaerobic system kicks in and lasts about 30-50 secs.

    same concept for doing high reps low weight to get ripped. (also a myth!!!) cause it will work you into the glycogen/aerobic system which is greater than 2 mins of time.

    I've been talking about this for quite sometime on here but people still insist that ''cardio'' burns fat ..again which is a myth icon_smile.gif



    Wow, i found this out experimentally in a 24 month period but didn't know why. My fat friends have been so brainwashed into the cardio myth that they continue their 5 miles runs with 15- 20 percent or more body fat. Same at the gym, fat people on all the exercise bikes the entire time i'm working out .I get leaner as they get fatter.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 8:24 AM GMT
    Isn't it fucking cool how all that works? LOL
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 16, 2009 10:13 PM GMT
    I agree the 20 min 2-3 times a week high intensity is what works best for meicon_smile.gif
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Jan 17, 2009 1:23 AM GMT
    flex89 saidI'll save you the googling: you're best to keep your aerobic and cardio exercise down to 20 minutes a session and you're better-off using those 20 minutes doing HIIT (google it).

    The human body is built for relatively short sprints, not for distance.


    Regarding the human body being built for sprints and not long distance. Not necessarily. Our large glutes give us the ability to perform long distance runs. This is unheard of in the primate world. We needed to be able to travel long distances to keep up with herd movements. If we were only built for sprinting, we'd be pretty miserable hunters since many animals are much faster than us.

    But I completely agree with HIIT being the more efficient way to burn body fat.
  • cowboyupnorth

    Posts: 264

    Jan 17, 2009 3:04 AM GMT
    So running a half marathon or full marathon is bad for you?

    Last year when I was running 5 miles a day followed by either Tae Bo or Circuit training I was in great shape. I was eating well but nearly all my training was aerobic sessions.

    I still want to run some half marathons but for my general health, so if it is bad for me then I need to do something else.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 17, 2009 6:05 AM GMT
    you guys want to lose body fat ?? Change your diet!!!
    Simple as that ..no need to depend on other things as they do not work the same as changing/modifying your food.

    HIIT is not going to work for all especially people with poor posture,high blood pressure ,obesity, adrenal fatigue etc etc etc

    And running for long periods of time really isn't healthy ..only when needed.
    Your joints and cartilage are like pencil erasers..you keep erasing what happens?




  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2009 8:04 PM GMT
    So, what are 'long aerobic sessions'?

    I've been doing an hour on the treadmill at 5.3mph +5 incline, is that 'long'? Not sure what my target heart rate is, suppose I need to do a count tomorrow.

    I have somewhat poor knees (they sound like Rice Crispies) and so avoid running/jogging; the impact is too much over a period. I think I damaged them on a leg machine a while back.
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Jan 27, 2009 2:35 AM GMT
    RealMasc saidYES.. aerobic/cardio/oxidative promotes fat storage and release of insulin/glucocorticoids.

    glucocorticoids-inhibits or retards amino acid incorporation into proteins,maintains normal blood sugar level, conserves glucose and promotes fat storage.

    You want to train in the glycogen-anaerboic and anaerobic atp-cp energy systems.
    This is why cardio freaks never lose fat ,yes they do lose weight from water and muscle but not from fat.
    Muscle consumes the most amount of calories therefore the body goes after them first when doing cardio/oxidative workouts.

    atp-cp/anaerobic lasts about 10 seconds then the glycogen/anaerobic system kicks in and lasts about 30-50 secs.

    same concept for doing high reps low weight to get ripped. (also a myth!!!) cause it will work you into the glycogen/aerobic system which is greater than 2 mins of time.

    I've been talking about this for quite sometime on here but people still insist that ''cardio'' burns fat ..again which is a myth icon_smile.gif



    hope this helps








    "...Glucocorticoids, which affect carbohydrate metabolism, modulate inflammatory reactions, and are involved in reactions to stress(pp. 719)."
    "...glucocorticoids, a group of hormones that play a role in carbohydrate metabolism, as the name implies, as well as in the metabolism of proteins and fatty acids (636)."

    Campbell and Farrell "Biochemistry" 6th edition. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Belmont, California. 2009.

    still unclear on whether the inhibition is really the aspect of what they do over activation of the glycogen cycle, but since it seems they both actively metabolize pretty much all three major types of caloric storage, im sure its both an activator and an inhibitor to the glycogen break down and build-up.