How San Francisco Is Forcing Its Gay Population Onto The Streets

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 21, 2014 1:13 AM GMT
    I knew it, (greedy) gentrification, I see it in WeHo too icon_mad.gif

    http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2014/10/20/3581941/san-francisco-lgbt-homeless/

    YES on Prop G!
    http://www.speculationfreesf.com/


    •A recent study showed that not a single home listed in San Francisco was affordable to a public school teacher. We’re losing diversity and losing our families to rising housing costs. Prop G helps keep families in San Francisco by rewarding long-term ownership and not quick real estate flipping.
    •More than 10,000 San Francisco tenants have been displaced by the Ellis Act since 1997. This is a crisis that hurts families and allows speculators to raise the cost of living in the city.
    •55% of Ellis Act evictions are issued by owners within the first year of ownership. Prop G will discourage this predatory housing practice.
    •Almost 1,700 units of rental housing have been lost since 2009—affecting more than 5,000 tenants. Prop G will help stop these losses and help stabilize the rental market in San Francisco.
    • Harvey Milk first proposed an Anti-Speculation Tax in 1978. Harvey recognized that predatory housing speculation is a dangerous force that threatens the security of San Francisco’s neighborhoods and communities. Let’s live up to his legacy and pass Prop. G.
    •Both the Examiner and Guardian have endorsed Prop. G
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    Oct 21, 2014 1:24 AM GMT
    On this topic I become a free market guy. I can't see how it's possible to control real estate costs or rental prices.

    I have a friend in SF who plans to move because of the high costs of living is impossible on what he can earn from his small business.
    So another city will win his business. That's the way things have always worked.
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    Oct 21, 2014 2:16 AM GMT
    I will definitely be voting yes.
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    Oct 21, 2014 2:49 AM GMT
    Move to the East Bay, Peninsula or the South Bay ( Oakland, Berkeley, Fremont, Walnut Creek, Pleasanton,Concord, San Jose or Redwood City. I live in the Southeast Bay, best decision ever made!!! SF is way overpriced, also quite congested and their weather is crappy compared to the rest of the Bay Area ( especially during the summer). IF I want a day in SF, it is just a BART ride, a Cal Train ticket away or a drive. A lot of other cities in the Bay Area or gay friendly, have lots of great neighborhoods and all of the above mentioned are public transit friendly. Just something to keep in mindicon_wink.gif
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Oct 21, 2014 4:57 PM GMT

    I have been told that Oakland is successfully revitalizing itself due to San Francisco being too expensive and large areas of that city are getting better and safer. That is good because it will help Oakland shed the negative image of being dangerous and drug infested.
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    Oct 21, 2014 5:03 PM GMT
    Yea, in the long run I think SF is only going to hurt itself. Spent 10 years living in Emeryville (next to Oakland & Berkeley for non-residents) and while prices were high they weren't anything like San Francisco high... and this was almost a decade ago. Overall public transit in the Bay Area is so good there's really no reason to pay those prices.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Oct 21, 2014 5:20 PM GMT

    It is not just gays being forced out of San Francisco but also a lot of traditional families are also being forced out of their neighborhoods as well. I am more than sure that the Fillmore neighborhood is being gentrified by kicking out all the blacks and sending black San Francisco on a forced march down either I-280 or US Route 101 into suburban San Mateo County. So the title of this forum thread needs to be changed because gays are not the only victims of gentrification. Blacks, Hispanics, and married folks with families to support are being forced out as well. It is very obvious the city and county of San Francisco is going to become an exclusive urban haven for only the super rich in much the same way as Midtown Manhattan in New York City.
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    Oct 21, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    It is not just gays being forced out of San Francisco but also a lot of traditional families are also being forced out of their neighborhoods as well. I am more than sure that the Fillmore neighborhood is being gentrified by kicking out all the blacks and sending black San Francisco on a forced march down either I-280 or US Route 101 into suburban San Mateo County. So the title of this forum thread needs to be changed because gays are not the only victims of gentrification. Blacks, Hispanics, and married folks with families to support are being forced out as well. It is very obvious the city and county of San Francisco is going to become an exclusive urban haven for only the super rich in much the same way as Midtown Manhattan in New York City.




    Yes, especially if the bay area continues to 'mysteriously' win major lotteries as they have been all of 2014 so far, these winners would be able to afford to live there and or buy up property depending on amount of winnings, I have noticed a lot of new millionaire bay area winners have been Asian icon_confused.gif

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/3919534
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    Oct 21, 2014 9:58 PM GMT
    Does the federal tax on gasoline make gasoline less expensive ? No, the cost of the tax is pushed forward to the consumer.

    Proposition G will just make it 24 percent more expensive to live here. When anyone sells a house it will be listed for 24 percent more to cover the tax.

    The city is as guilty/ greedy as anyone for increasing the cost of living in SF .Water rates increased 30 percent In 3 years and taxes go up every year and free parking last year became pay parking and they raised the rates 20 percent or more. Fees and permits went up so high the Sacramento had to step in to control them. So vote no on G .
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    Oct 22, 2014 3:50 AM GMT
    scruffLA said
    roadbikeRob said
    It is not just gays being forced out of San Francisco but also a lot of traditional families are also being forced out of their neighborhoods as well. I am more than sure that the Fillmore neighborhood is being gentrified by kicking out all the blacks and sending black San Francisco on a forced march down either I-280 or US Route 101 into suburban San Mateo County. So the title of this forum thread needs to be changed because gays are not the only victims of gentrification. Blacks, Hispanics, and married folks with families to support are being forced out as well. It is very obvious the city and county of San Francisco is going to become an exclusive urban haven for only the super rich in much the same way as Midtown Manhattan in New York City.




    Yes, especially if the bay area continues to 'mysteriously' win major lotteries as they have been all of 2014 so far, these winners would be able to afford to live there and or buy up property depending on amount of winnings, I have noticed a lot of new millionaire bay area winners have been Asian icon_confused.gif

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/3919534


    LOL, so true!! We need to start playing the lotteryicon_wink.gif
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    Oct 22, 2014 4:51 AM GMT
    Popular topic. Sucks to be single with that single income.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/business/more-renters-find-30-affordability-ratio-unattainable.html?_r=0

    http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2014/07/30/renters-are-sobbing-as-silicon-valley-rents-rise.html?page=all

    I might be ducking a $250/month rent increase next April by moving 'cross country before then. Fingers crossed.

    In the end, show some love for the folks trapped in Vancouver BC. Listening to tech industry folks trying to afford keeping their jobs in the most expensive city in North America? Not for me. Fun to visit though.
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    Oct 22, 2014 5:23 AM GMT
    The main problem as well are employers like Twitter, Google, etc., whose exponential salaries no one can compete. I have co-workers, who live in the city that are being displaced in neighborhoods because as a developer comes in and renovates and builds apartments they are immediately sold or rents skyrocket. The city of San Francisco loves the tax dollars and revenue and will continue to attract these high tech companies, but like everyone mentioned is creating a crisis in housing not just the gay population, but everyone else.
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    Oct 22, 2014 8:14 PM GMT
    This is getting really messy and is really sad for the regular folk who are being forced out, even more important now, Yes on G
    Market forces? and just what the hell forces are those? yuppie silicon valley? blaming rent control? icon_lol.gif

    Note: Starbucks is even in trouble in the bay area as small gourmet coffee shops are popping up charging a minimum of $6 dollars for a small regular coffee, in a coffee cup, to those who can afford such a luxury icon_rolleyes.gif


    San Francisco Can’t Force Big Payouts for Ousted Tenants
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-21/san-francisco-can-t-require-big-payouts-to-oust-tenants.html?cmpid=yhoo

    U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco sided with property owners who challenged the law. He faulted the measure as penalizing property owners for the high rents evicted tenants will face, saying high prices are caused by market forces such limited supply and by rent control, which lets many renters enjoy lower-than-market prices


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 22, 2014 8:49 PM GMT
    Those are really just factors for single person income as another poster stated. Or for people that don't make as much single.....

    It is still possible to find affordable housing in SF it just requires a lot of effort
    [which I don't really care to put time towards]

    Lol mission district families are like --- hollla I'll sell my house for 3 million dollars and buy a ranch peace ouuuuut!

    I dunno, I suggest bouncing from SF :s I was sad to leave when recently there buuuuuuuuut....

    most my friends that moved there are leaving. A friend told me its 60$ for a plane ticket [I never plan well enough and always paid 100$] so I could just visit friends remaining for a weekend and leaaaaaave icon_biggrin.gif]

    peace out sf ! :3 I'm moving to LA :3
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    Oct 22, 2014 9:46 PM GMT
    Kinda sad but the reality there isn't really anything one can do about it since its an open market and tech industry is still booming and foreign investors especially from mainland China will buy out whatever they want. I guess the gays will have to find another city to revivalize which is never a bad thing especially a city like Oakland.
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    Oct 23, 2014 12:40 AM GMT
    socal56 saidKinda sad but the reality there isn't really anything one can do about it since its an open market and tech industry is still booming and foreign investors especially from mainland China will buy out whatever they want. I guess the gays will have to find another city to revivalize which is never a bad thing especially a city like Oakland.



    Lets not forget 50 years of history, after all, erasing it is what this is becoming:


    The Castro gradually became a working-class Irish neighborhood in the 1930s and remained so until the mid-1960s. There was originally a cable car line with large double-ended cable cars that ran along Castro Street from Market Street to 29th St. until the tracks were dismantled in 1941 and it was replaced by the 24 MUNI bus. The Castro is at the end of the straight portion of the Market Street thoroughfare and a mostly residential area follows Market Street as it curves and rises up and around the Twin Peaks mountains.

    The U.S. military dishonorably discharged thousands of gay servicemen in San Francisco during World War II (early 1940s) because of their sexuality. Many settled in the Castro, beginning a noticeable influx of gays to the Castro neighborhood.[11] A popular gathering place had been near the foot of Market Street, but in 1967 this area was torn up and disrupted due to the tunneling and building of the Bay Area Rapid Transit stations underground.

    The Castro came more of age as a gay mecca during the 1970s after the Summer of Love in the neighboring Haight-Ashbury district in 1967 which is separated from the Castro by a large mountain topped by Buena Vista Park. The hippie and free love movements had fostered communal living and free society ideas including housing of large groups of people in hippie communes. Many were overtly gay-inclusive, or even LGBT-centric. Even before the Summer of Love gathering LGBT households were being set-up in the Castro neighborhood. Before the 1960s hippie scene, the car culture sweeping the U.S. led to a flight to the suburbs for many of the area families who saw the counter-cultures in the sixties, including women's lib, and increasing acceptance of minorities including blacks and gays as oppositional to their church and family centered lives. The 1967 gathering brought tens of thousands of middle-class youth from all over the United States to the Haight which saw its own flight of sorts when well-organized individuals and collectives started to see the Castro as an oasis from the massive influx. Many of the hippies had no way to support themselves or places to shelter.

    The neighborhood previously known as Eureka Valley became known as the Castro after the landmark theatre by that name near the corner of Castro and Market Streets. Before the Spring of 1970 (April or May), the Castro was straight. Then Herb Caen wrote in his colume that Polk Street was getting kinda seedy and that any gay who wanted a better neighborhood should take a yellow taxi to the corner of Castro and Market on a Friday at 11AM. I was working at the Castro-Market Bank of America that day, and looked out at a sea of yellow cabs. In one day the neighborhood was transformed. The twin Peaks bar was not gay until that day. The large Victorian houses were available at low rents or available for purchase for low down payments when their former middle-class owners had fled to the suburbs.

    By 1973, Harvey Milk, who would become the most famous resident of the neighborhood, opened a camera store, Castro Camera, and began political involvement as a gay activist, further contributing to the notion of the Castro as a gay destination. Some of the culture of the late 1970s included what was termed the "Castro clone", a mode of dress and personal grooming that exemplified butchness and masculinity of the working-class men in construction—tight denim jeans, black or sand combat boots, tight T-shirt or, often, an Izod crocodile shirt, possibly a red plaid flannel outer shirt, and usually sporting a mustache or full beard—in vogue with the gay male population at the time, and which gave rise to the nickname "Clone Canyon" for the stretch of Castro Street between 18th and Market Streets.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 23, 2014 1:06 AM GMT
    lmao how is this "forcing the gay population onto the streets"?

    It's like calling my anti-Semite neighbor homophobic just because jews can be gay too lol
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    Oct 23, 2014 2:31 AM GMT
    Sounds to me more like they're driving low-middle income earners into low-rent apartments.

    I fail to see how this has anything to do with the LGBT population.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 23, 2014 3:53 AM GMT
    Here's how to solve the housing problem California:

    turn over the illegal aliens you are harboring to the feds.
  • roadbikeRob

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    Oct 23, 2014 1:01 PM GMT

    Tell these wealthy, young techies to move back to San Jose where they rightfully belong and stop pushing up housing costs in San Francisco. There problem solved.
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    Oct 23, 2014 2:37 PM GMT
    scruffLA said
    socal56 saidKinda sad but the reality there isn't really anything one can do about it since its an open market and tech industry is still booming and foreign investors especially from mainland China will buy out whatever they want. I guess the gays will have to find another city to revivalize which is never a bad thing especially a city like Oakland.



    Lets not forget 50 years of history, after all, erasing it is what this is becoming:


    The Castro gradually became a working-class Irish neighborhood in the 1930s and remained so until the mid-1960s. There was originally a cable car line with large double-ended cable cars that ran along Castro Street from Market Street to 29th St. until the tracks were dismantled in 1941 and it was replaced by the 24 MUNI bus. The Castro is at the end of the straight portion of the Market Street thoroughfare and a mostly residential area follows Market Street as it curves and rises up and around the Twin Peaks mountains.

    The U.S. military dishonorably discharged thousands of gay servicemen in San Francisco during World War II (early 1940s) because of their sexuality. Many settled in the Castro, beginning a noticeable influx of gays to the Castro neighborhood.[11] A popular gathering place had been near the foot of Market Street, but in 1967 this area was torn up and disrupted due to the tunneling and building of the Bay Area Rapid Transit stations underground.

    The Castro came more of age as a gay mecca during the 1970s after the Summer of Love in the neighboring Haight-Ashbury district in 1967 which is separated from the Castro by a large mountain topped by Buena Vista Park. The hippie and free love movements had fostered communal living and free society ideas including housing of large groups of people in hippie communes. Many were overtly gay-inclusive, or even LGBT-centric. Even before the Summer of Love gathering LGBT households were being set-up in the Castro neighborhood. Before the 1960s hippie scene, the car culture sweeping the U.S. led to a flight to the suburbs for many of the area families who saw the counter-cultures in the sixties, including women's lib, and increasing acceptance of minorities including blacks and gays as oppositional to their church and family centered lives. The 1967 gathering brought tens of thousands of middle-class youth from all over the United States to the Haight which saw its own flight of sorts when well-organized individuals and collectives started to see the Castro as an oasis from the massive influx. Many of the hippies had no way to support themselves or places to shelter.

    The neighborhood previously known as Eureka Valley became known as the Castro after the landmark theatre by that name near the corner of Castro and Market Streets. Before the Spring of 1970 (April or May), the Castro was straight. Then Herb Caen wrote in his colume that Polk Street was getting kinda seedy and that any gay who wanted a better neighborhood should take a yellow taxi to the corner of Castro and Market on a Friday at 11AM. I was working at the Castro-Market Bank of America that day, and looked out at a sea of yellow cabs. In one day the neighborhood was transformed. The twin Peaks bar was not gay until that day. The large Victorian houses were available at low rents or available for purchase for low down payments when their former middle-class owners had fled to the suburbs.

    By 1973, Harvey Milk, who would become the most famous resident of the neighborhood, opened a camera store, Castro Camera, and began political involvement as a gay activist, further contributing to the notion of the Castro as a gay destination. Some of the culture of the late 1970s included what was termed the "Castro clone", a mode of dress and personal grooming that exemplified butchness and masculinity of the working-class men in construction—tight denim jeans, black or sand combat boots, tight T-shirt or, often, an Izod crocodile shirt, possibly a red plaid flannel outer shirt, and usually sporting a mustache or full beard—in vogue with the gay male population at the time, and which gave rise to the nickname "Clone Canyon" for the stretch of Castro Street between 18th and Market Streets.


    "I was working at the Castro-Market Bank of America that day,"

    You did? In 1970?

    I wasn't there on my own until my first Rosebowl trip in 1971 or 72. I quite liked it and had my trusty Damrons with me. I always thought that I was born around five years too late so I missed Haight-Ashbury in 1967 and Monterey 67.
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    Oct 24, 2014 3:58 AM GMT
    Initiative G is ridiculous and hasn't a snowball's chance in hell of passing - (and would be ruled unconstitutional if it did pass.) If the idiots who drafted the initiative shared only half a brain among all of them, they would have based their tax percentages on the capital gain (sales price less cost basis) of the properties being sold - not on the gross sales price.

    The real problems causing expensive housing in SF, are that:
    1. There is very little available land (This is not New York or Chicago);
    2. The radicals on the Board of Supervisors have voted against allowing tens of thousands of new housing units in the last 15 years, which would otherwise have been built;
    3. Lots of very highly paid tech workers are moving into the city, and can afford to pay whatever it costs for rent or purchasing a condo. Supply and demand. No supply - big demand. Econ 101.

    (And if the OP lives in LA, his concern is what?)
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    Oct 24, 2014 4:45 AM GMT
    I live in Vancouver and can tell you that real estate prices are truly insane here. Without a doubt the sky high prices are caused largely by wealthy investors from Mainland China searching for a bolt-hole to store money "just in case".

    I think this type of tax would be a great start towards thwarting speculators who are driving up property values. In Canada home owners do not generally pay capital gains taxes on their homes so I would also consider whether or not removing the capital gains tax exemption would be effective.

    These steps can only go so far, though. If the City is truly livable too many people will want to live there and prices will rise. Other steps need to be reviewed, both locally and regionally, to see where urban densification makes sense.

  • mstone18

    Posts: 84

    Oct 27, 2014 11:26 PM GMT
    Nothing lasts forever, especially widely held assumptions.

    Speculation is true to its underpinnings. Its more often than not a sure thing.

    Real Estate goes through cycles like most things.

    I grew up listening to "..they aren't making new land.." to shore up the position that investing in Real Estate was a sure thing.

    I tend to think there is a norm to which all cycles swing towards, from high or low. And long term that reflects the true value of the Real Estate.

    In the San Francisco area its an interesting area now, but when the World as a whole becomes technology based as opposed to evolving towards.. and its pervasive everywhere. Then the reality of Earthquakes, Water and Power limitations will set in and bring costs back down.

    It might take a generation, but probably significantly less. 3D printing will bring manufacturing back to local regions, even to the microchip. I believe within ten years. Then why outsource to a foreign country?

    Recycling of Rare Earths will even undermine (pun) "mining". Right now recycling isn't paying back the true value of what is being recycled. That will change.

    From the Renaissance and before culturally it was whoever had more open minds and could bring something new to make life better for everyone that drew people and communities together.. until they got old and brittle and fundamentalist.. which tends to result in trying to strangle open ways of thought and exploring.

    In-between as the old proverbs say.. is "opportunity" profiting on the assumptions and closely held views of people who don't look at things very critically and just accept what other people say.

    We do have to live in the here and now.

    Every one has to pay a rent or a tax today or the next day.

    But look up and be optimistic, things weren't always the way they are today.. and they won't always be that way tomorrow. In the flux is opportunity.. just don't overtly speculate when the time comes.

    If I might also speculate a bit. Asia and China in particular are going through an especially difficult internal technological arms race with its population.. which it will probably loose sooner than later.

    When it does, unless it breaks up into regions like the old Soviet Union did, the living conditions and commerce will explode. And people will prefer to stay at home comfortable in their own culture. And places like BC may fall back to normal prices for Real Estate, or become an even more popular vacation destination.. in between however Real Estate will probably fall until tourism rebounds. Its a beautiful place its economy will survive.

    In my opinion China is loosing its best opportunity for a gentle adjustment, and BC is in the process of becoming the pseudo replacement for Hong Kong.

    Storms only last for so long before they run out of energy. This too shall pass.
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    Oct 27, 2014 11:58 PM GMT
    Wait until an earthquake hits! I am sure that will put some perspective on it. The city has been destroyed a few times and history will repeat again.

    Now, sunny mesa is attracting companies like Aerospace and apple. Move on down!