New Routine Required!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 25, 2014 2:32 PM GMT
    Hey guys, been working out consistently for almost a year now and I feel that I'm ready to further challenge myself with my routine.

    I first started like this:
    Mon: chest and triceps
    tues: off
    weds:legs and shoulders
    thurs: off
    friday:back and biceps
    sat: off
    sun:abs and cardio

    Then I felt I needed to up my game after a few months and switched it up:

    Mon:chest/abs
    Tues:triceps/cardio
    weds:legs/abs
    thurs:shoulders/cardio
    fri: back/abs
    sat:Biceps/cardio
    Sun: off

    Cardio only for 10 to 15 Mins HIIT, stair master or elliptical. This was working amazingly well for me up until recently.

    I feel like I've gotten too used to this now as I've been doing this for about 6-7 months now. My friend suggested working on the same body part twice a week now to see better results.

    I would say I'm at the intermediate level now... Could anyone recommend a split they think would help me see better results? I do about 4 to 5 excersises per body part. I also used to be 240 lbs, so I've come a long way personally in terms of fitness.

    Some progression stats (not limited to only these excersises) :
    Dumbbell Chest Press: 15 lbs to 55 lbs
    Decline chest press: 40 lbs to 55 lbs
    Shoulder Dumbbell Press: 15 lbs to 55 lbs
    Squats: 50 lbs to 200 lbs
    Deadlifts: 60 lbs to 110 lbs
    Pullups: weighted at 60 lbs to no weight
    Bicep curls: 15 lbs to 30 lbs
    Walking Lunges: 15 lbs to 45 lbs

    Any help or advice would be amazing. Thanks RJers!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 25, 2014 10:33 PM GMT
    What are your fitness goals?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 26, 2014 12:04 AM GMT
    I definitely want to get stronger and be able to lift heavier! Feels like my progress has slowed down quite a bit. Not sure if that's normal around the 1 year mark :s
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    Oct 26, 2014 4:10 AM GMT
    If you just want to get stronger, you should change your routine completely. Your current one is more a bodybuilding routine. You'll want to simply and stick with basic compound movements.

    You should look into the Strong Lifts routine. Basically, it's composed of lifting heavy, 5 reps, 5 sets. All basic stuff.. barbell bench press, barbell rows, squats, deadlifts, and a few other exercises I can't remember.

    Also, if you're reader, check out Starting Strength. It's a pretty good primer for weightlifting, and can provide some insight for either bodybuilding or powerlifting routines.
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    Oct 26, 2014 4:07 PM GMT
    Dude, you can keep your current schedule but it's definitely time to change exercises. 6 months, same exercise? You will plateau.

    I disagree, somewhat, with "xrichx"when he says

    "You should look into the Strong Lifts routine. Basically, it's composed of lifting heavy, 5 reps, 5 sets. All basic stuff.. barbell bench press, barbell rows, squats, deadlifts, and a few other exercises I can't remember."

    This is a workout for SIZE(hypertrophy) not strength specific, any proper workout gives you gains in strength. Actually for max strength your reps should be in the range of 6-8 reps at 75-85% of your max effort in that exercise. For example, your max bench is 225lb then do sets around 190lbs for 6-8 reps. You do reps until you're one rep away from failure. (That is where you can't do the rep properly while keeping form.) Typical rest between sets should be 0-60 secs for you. Start timing your workouts and see if you can complete the same workout faster, these are variable that can increase your results.

    Compound movements are always good to build strength. He's 100% correct there.

    Progress to the next level of exercises. For example, do bicep curls on one foot, standing up, or a bosu ball. Instead of just lunges add split squat jumps, box jumps (jumping down is more difficult than jumping up) Add deficit deadlifts, Glute ham raises, or romanian deadlifts. Most exercises have a progression, meaning a more difficult way to do them. Start looking into the next level of progression and don't be afraid to superset.

  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1035

    Oct 26, 2014 7:14 PM GMT
    Yes, you should work each body part twice a week. Once you get past the initial stage of learning the exercises and training your muscles to respond, once a week on each body part will only maintain your current level; you won't see much further growth.

    You'll have to determine for yourself what kind of split works best for you. When I was young I did biceps/triceps/chest one day, shoulders and back the next day, legs the third day. And repeated that cycle, which left one day off per week (important for recovery).

    Now I do biceps one day, chest and triceps the second day, shoulders and back the third. I quit doing legs in the gym long ago because my running workouts - lots of sprints and stairs - do a better job on my legs (you can look at my pics and decide).

    Like I said, this is just a suggestion. You'll have to find what works best for you. A lot of guys seem to like back and biceps one day, chest and shoulders the next - but I don't think that'd work for me at all

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    Oct 26, 2014 10:08 PM GMT
    The_Perfect_Ashlar saidDude, you can keep your current schedule but it's definitely time to change exercises. 6 months, same exercise? You will plateau.

    I disagree, somewhat, with "xrichx"when he says

    "You should look into the Strong Lifts routine. Basically, it's composed of lifting heavy, 5 reps, 5 sets. All basic stuff.. barbell bench press, barbell rows, squats, deadlifts, and a few other exercises I can't remember."

    This is a workout for SIZE(hypertrophy) not strength specific, any proper workout gives you gains in strength. Actually for max strength your reps should be in the range of 6-8 reps at 75-85% of your max effort in that exercise. For example, your max bench is 225lb then do sets around 190lbs for 6-8 reps. You do reps until you're one rep away from failure. (That is where you can't do the rep properly while keeping form.) Typical rest between sets should be 0-60 secs for you. Start timing your workouts and see if you can complete the same workout faster, these are variable that can increase your results.

    Compound movements are always good to build strength. He's 100% correct there.

    Progress to the next level of exercises. For example, do bicep curls on one foot, standing up, or a bosu ball. Instead of just lunges add split squat jumps, box jumps (jumping down is more difficult than jumping up) Add deficit deadlifts, Glute ham raises, or romanian deadlifts. Most exercises have a progression, meaning a more difficult way to do them. Start looking into the next level of progression and don't be afraid to superset.


    Well, all weightlifting routines stimulate hypertrophy. But OP is looking to build strength, so lower rep and heavy weights is something he should explore, along with longer rest periods.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24714538

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 27, 2014 2:13 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    The_Perfect_Ashlar saidDude, you can keep your current schedule but it's definitely time to change exercises. 6 months, same exercise? You will plateau.

    I disagree, somewhat, with "xrichx"when he says

    "You should look into the Strong Lifts routine. Basically, it's composed of lifting heavy, 5 reps, 5 sets. All basic stuff.. barbell bench press, barbell rows, squats, deadlifts, and a few other exercises I can't remember."

    This is a workout for SIZE(hypertrophy) not strength specific, any proper workout gives you gains in strength. Actually for max strength your reps should be in the range of 6-8 reps at 75-85% of your max effort in that exercise. For example, your max bench is 225lb then do sets around 190lbs for 6-8 reps. You do reps until you're one rep away from failure. (That is where you can't do the rep properly while keeping form.) Typical rest between sets should be 0-60 secs for you. Start timing your workouts and see if you can complete the same workout faster, these are variable that can increase your results.

    Compound movements are always good to build strength. He's 100% correct there.

    Progress to the next level of exercises. For example, do bicep curls on one foot, standing up, or a bosu ball. Instead of just lunges add split squat jumps, box jumps (jumping down is more difficult than jumping up) Add deficit deadlifts, Glute ham raises, or romanian deadlifts. Most exercises have a progression, meaning a more difficult way to do them. Start looking into the next level of progression and don't be afraid to superset.


    Well, all weightlifting routines stimulate hypertrophy. But OP is looking to build strength, so lower rep and heavy weights is something he should explore, along with longer rest periods.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24714538

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.


    Gotcha.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2014 12:35 PM GMT
    Thanks so much for all the replies! Much appreciated.

    Everyone's been telling me that I'm getting skinnier but I feel like I'm more cut now... Wanted to get my BF% low enough first before I try my first bulk. Should I just start now? Seems everyone decides winter is the best time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2014 9:19 PM GMT
    Persian_Leo saidThanks so much for all the replies! Much appreciated.

    Everyone's been telling me that I'm getting skinnier but I feel like I'm more cut now... Wanted to get my BF% low enough first before I try my first bulk. Should I just start now? Seems everyone decides winter is the best time.
    your body fat is def good ! Your gaining muscle! U look great leo , I'm proud of u