Gay activist admits to eight ‘mercy’ killings in 1980s, activist calls for investigation

  • metta

    Posts: 39138

    Oct 31, 2014 2:41 PM GMT
    Gay activist admits to eight ‘mercy’ killings in 1980s, activist calls for investigation

    Veteran gay activist David Mixner, 68, admitted Monday that the devastation of HIV/AIDS on seven friends and a lover in the 1980s drove him to murder them out of “mercy.” The revelation has a prominent anti-euthanasia activist calling for a criminal investigation.

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/gay-activist-admits-to-eight-mercy-killings-in-1980s-activist-calls-for-inv
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    Oct 31, 2014 2:59 PM GMT
    Boy, that's a tough one. Maybe he shouldn't have said anything. Not at that level.

    Probably many of us know someone who has administered morphine to help a dying loved one. And probably we all should have someone who we know would do that for us should we need it. But this seems a bit much. I'd rather have read that he helped the family of his friends rather than that he had a first hand in it. It's hard to imagine the authorities not going after him.
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    Oct 31, 2014 3:44 PM GMT
    I won't judge him.

    Is it murder to assist someone in dying if they ask you?

    Yes, I know what the law says, but the law isn't always right. I don't know what I would do if a loved one who was suffering intense pain and there was no hope of a cure asked me to help him die. I hope I'm never in that position.
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    Oct 31, 2014 4:07 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI won't judge him.

    Is it murder to assist someone in dying if they ask you?

    Yes, I know what the law says, but the law isn't always right. I don't know what I would do if a loved one who was suffering intense pain and there was no hope of a cure asked me to help him die. I hope I'm never in that position.


    I would not call assisted suicide murder and we might never have the facts on these cases. I'm not sure how I feel but it seems the numbers warrant at least a pretty thorough investigation and maybe a trial. I really don't know how I feel about that.

    If it was one on one, family with family, spouses, best friends, etc., my initial reaction would be to defend that person. But on reading this I'm a bit torn between thinking family should have been involved but even fewer of us were out of the closet then, even fewer to accepting families; yet, the relationships this guy had with so many, how close could they have possibly been. While, on the other hand, people do make requests in desperate times.

    Certainly, I wouldn't be able to decide this one off the cuff. I think that, at least, is safe to say.
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    Oct 31, 2014 8:42 PM GMT
    An undisclosed topic of the medical profession is that euthanasia occurs via hospice care 100's of times every single day.

    A side effect of a standard dose of morphine (commonly used in hospice care) is to depress respiration.

    When respiration is depressed in someone who is seriously ill, they frequently die.

    So a lot of folks in hospice care are dying from standard, even low first doses of morphine.


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    Nov 01, 2014 12:57 AM GMT
    mx5guynj saidAn undisclosed topic of the medical profession is that euthanasia occurs via hospice care 100's of times every single day.

    A side effect of a standard dose of morphine (commonly used in hospice care) is to depress respiration.

    When respiration is depressed in someone who is seriously ill, they frequently die.

    So a lot of folks in hospice care are dying from standard, even low first doses of morphine.


    This is not an undisclosed topic. Unless you've never had a loved one getting hospice care, none of this is a surprise, nor is it hidden information. People in hospice care nearly always die...because they're already terminal.

    Morphine (in addition to suppressing respiration) also stops the pain. How do you want to die? In agony, or sleepily? That's your choice when you turn yourself over to hospice.
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    Nov 01, 2014 5:26 AM GMT
    Bringing up hospice is a good point but the glaring difference is the documentation. In hospice, there's pretty much no doubt that person was on the verge of death, however verge might be measured.

    The problem here is no documentation at least not as shown in the initial article. Also with hospice, family is involved. Just imagine 8 or whatever the number of families all of a sudden finding out this information now. It sounds a bit horrifying.
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    Nov 02, 2014 12:38 AM GMT
    "I lost 300 friends, 29 out of 30 close friends. I delivered 90 eulogies in two years.”

    And what happens in battles, in wars?

    Maybe in a modern military, the injured have excellent care but where and when that wasn't the case, how much euthanasia and suicide was going on? In the Jewish Revolt against Rome, Josephus had his men commit suicide by drawing lots. He never drew a lot to kill himself. At Masada, a nobler death was assisted.
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    Nov 02, 2014 2:52 PM GMT
    Whoever or whatever gave me a mind enabled it to make judgments and I have no problem doing so: whatever his motivation, Mixner, by his own admission, at least assisted in the killing of another. If not murder, that's manslaughter, and needs to be investigated and punished if culpability is found. The law may not always be right, and even an ass at times, but it can be changed and until it is breaking it is a crime.
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    Nov 02, 2014 4:29 PM GMT
    MGINSD saidWhoever or whatever gave me a mind enabled it to make judgments and I have no problem doing so: whatever his motivation, Mixner, by his own admission, at least assisted in the killing of another. If not murder, that's manslaughter, and needs to be investigated and punished if culpability is found. The law may not always be right, and even an ass at times, but it can be changed and until it is breaking it is a crime.

    Bla bla bla. You'd be singing a different tune if it was some Log Cabin guy who'd admitted this. Your partisan ranting betrays you.
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    Nov 02, 2014 5:22 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio said
    This is not an undisclosed topic. Unless you've never had a loved one getting hospice care, none of this is a surprise, nor is it hidden information. People in hospice care nearly always die...because they're already terminal.

    Morphine (in addition to suppressing respiration) also stops the pain. How do you want to die? In agony, or sleepily? That's your choice when you turn yourself over to hospice.


    Exactly. Most palliative end-of-life care probably shortens life by a few days. Big deal. I'm sure most of us would choose an easy death over a difficult one, for the sake of a week.
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    Nov 02, 2014 5:44 PM GMT
    All those assisting the suicide of their loved ones--and not that this was necessarily that--particularly when requested by the dying (assuming no severe enough dementia to question the integrity of such request) to help speed through in mercy what would otherwise be a prolonged and agonizing but certain death should think themselves guilty of manslaughter? No.

    Some laws still on the books can be used to effectively persecute even if they can't be used to successfully prosecute. For instance

    http://theweek.com/article/index/247588/gay-men-are-still-being-arrested-for-being-gay-in-louisiana
    they were arrested under Louisiana's anti-sodomy law, despite the fact that such laws were deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 2003 in Lawrence v. Texas.

    Also, wrong judgment can be worse than withholding judgment at least until more facts are discovered.

    Not only that, but during discovery, whether that means an investigation or trial or however it manifests, consciousness is informed which possibly changes law which in itself ought to question culpability. If law changes during the process or as a result of the process, is there no exoneration? Even if law is not changed, are there extenuating circumstances? So to say punish before that process might in itself be an absurd judgment--possibly prejudice before the facts--not indicative of using what God gave you. Not the life, not the brain.
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    Nov 02, 2014 5:57 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    mickeytopogigio said
    This is not an undisclosed topic. Unless you've never had a loved one getting hospice care, none of this is a surprise, nor is it hidden information. People in hospice care nearly always die...because they're already terminal.

    Morphine (in addition to suppressing respiration) also stops the pain. How do you want to die? In agony, or sleepily? That's your choice when you turn yourself over to hospice.


    Exactly. Most palliative end-of-life care probably shortens life by a few days. Big deal. I'm sure most of us would choose an easy death over a difficult one, for the sake of a week.


    And sometimes we give up relatively good days, even years. How about a (edited to correct term) person with tetraplegia who then tests positive for early dementia who decides to opt out of that nightmare while still having wits about? Why should they be doomed to live through that if they don't want it? Why do they have to miss their window of opportunity to save themselves from that inevitable suffering? The wheelchair wasn't enough?
  • SuntoryTime

    Posts: 656

    Nov 03, 2014 7:35 AM GMT
    MGINSD saidWhoever or whatever gave me a mind enabled it to make judgments and I have no problem doing so: whatever his motivation, Mixner, by his own admission, at least assisted in the killing of another. If not murder, that's manslaughter, and needs to be investigated and punished if culpability is found. The law may not always be right, and even an ass at times, but it can be changed and until it is breaking it is a crime.